Weiss/Manfredi’s Cornell Tech Campus building tops off

Architecture Development East News
(Courtesy Forest City Ratner)

(Courtesy Forest City Ratner)

Residential towers are rising on the banks of the East River in Queens, Brooklyn, and Manhattan. It’s easy to forget that, in the middle of the river, development at Cornell University’s New York City campus on Roosevelt Island is speeding ahead. The Bridge at Cornell Tech, designed by Weiss/Manfredi, topped off Monday.

(Courtesy Forest City Ratner)

(Courtesy Forest City Ratner)

That building will have a partial green roof and a photovoltaic array to produce energy for campus. Stepped lawns leading up to the entrance encourage the building’s program of spontaneous social interaction to spill out onto the street.

Along with Cornell Tech phase one buildings, the Bridge is set to open summer 2017. When complete, the 12-acre campus on Roosevelt Island will be the home of hundreds of Cornell faculty and staff, and around 2,000 students. The master plan, executed by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (SOM) with James Corner Field Operations, calls for a “river-to-river” campus with 2.5 acres of public space and ten buildings that perform to a high environmental standard. The video above gives a sense of scale and layout of the development.

Phase one buildings include the Bloomberg Center, an open-plan academic facility designed by Thom Mayne of Morphosis Architects. The Center, which aims to be one of the largest net-zero energy buildings in the U.S., takes its design cues from the collaborative workspaces of Silicon Valley. Handel Architects designed a student, faculty, and staff residence with an ambition to become the world’s first residential Passive House high-rise.

(Courtesy Kilograph)

The Bridge, right, faces out onto a public lawn. (Courtesy Kilograph)

(Courtesy Kilograph)

Rendering of the complete campus. Weiss/Manfredi’s Bridge, right, and Thom Mayne’s Bloomberg Center, left, are part of the first phase of campus construction. (Courtesy Kilograph)

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