Rapid Response: Jeanne Gang reimagines the police station in Chicago

Architecture Midwest On View Urbanism
Studio Gang's Polis Project tracks a history of police stations (Mimi Zeiger/AN)

Studio Gang’s Polis Project tracks a history of American police stations (Mimi Zeiger/AN)

“We were outraged by what we saw—by the violence in everyday life,” said Jeanne Gang when asked about the impetuous behind her firm’s project Polis Project, a proposed reinvention of the typical police station on view at the Chicago Cultural Center as part of the Chicago Architecture Biennial. The work, like any number of projects in the exhibition, highlights the what curator Joseph Grima calls “architectural agency,” where firms take on projects not for a client, but out of a sense of urgency to architecturally address important issues.

Polis Project offers up a proposal for Chicago's 10th District. (Mimi Zeiger/AN)

Polis Project offers up a proposal for Chicago’s 10th District. (Mimi Zeiger/AN)

Sparked by incidents of police violence against African Americans across the United States and supported by the May 2015 Obama administration policy brief: the “Final Report of the President’s Task Force on 21st Century Policing,” Studio Gang’s research and design proposal flanks the two sides of the Center’s grand stair. One side displays a history of law enforcement architectures—from the neighborhood police box to today’s bunker-like stations—and the other a design proposal for Chicago’s 10th District Station in Lawndale.

Presidential policy on view in the Chicago Cultural Center (Mimi Zeiger/AN)

Presidential policy on view in the Chicago Cultural Center (Mimi Zeiger/AN)

“We asked ourselves “What is a police station in the 21st Century?”” she noted, pointing out that while past incarnations were community-based as police officers moved out of the neighborhoods where they had a beat, the tensions between locals and officers increased. The architecture of reflected that conflict.

“The police station doesn’t carry the same ideas of democracy as a court house,” she noted, but by imbuing these values into the station building, Studio Gang hopes to point a way forward to a new idea of architecture. “Everyone comes though the same front door,” Gang said, and explained how the building is more like a community center than a jail. Little things, like free Wi-Fi, and big things, like mental health services, computer labs, park space and retrofitted housing for officers in the neighborhoods, are meant to break down the barriers between the police and residents.

Work is already underway. A police-owned parking lot is being transformed into a new park and basketball courts that is meant to be a shared, non-confrontational space in the neighborhood. “This community will have a safe place to play.”

Studio Gang's proposal includes a station, gardens, housing, parks, and other community amenities. (Mimi Zeiger/AN)

Studio Gang’s proposal includes a station, gardens, housing, parks, and other community amenities. (Mimi Zeiger/AN)

Older policing models integrated officers and community. (Mimi Zeiger/AN)

Older policing models integrated officers and community. (Mimi Zeiger/AN)

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