Developers get smart on the eventual redo of D.C.’s Brutalist J. Edgar Hoover Building

Architecture Development East News
The J. Edgar Hoover Building (Courtesy Federal Bureau of Investigation)

The J. Edgar Hoover Building (Courtesy Federal Bureau of Investigation)

A long-standing fortress of state secrecy is under siege. The federal government is selling Washington, D.C.’s J. Edgar Hoover Building to a developer who, citizens hope, will turn the FBI’s headquarters into a mixed use development.

(Wally Gobetz / Flickr)

(Wally Gobetz / Flickr)

Designed by Charles F. Murphy and completed in 1975, the 2.8 million square foot Brutalist building is praised and reviled for all the reasons Brutalist buildings are praised and reviled. Despite its historical significance and because of $80 million in deferred maintenance, the building will likely be replaced with development that creates a more pedestrian-friendly streetscape. There are, however, massive bureaucratic hurdles to clear before the property can be developed.

First, the congressionally-approved 1974 master plan must be revised s0 the site can be developed as a non-office building. However, the Pennsylvania Avenue Development Corporation, the entity that created the plan, folded in 1996. Its responsibilities are now shared by the National Park Service, the General Services Administration (GSA), and National Capital Planning Commission (NCPC). The three agencies must agree on every step of the plan for it to move forward. When and if these master plan revisions are approved, the agencies can develop design guidelines for the site.

The design guidelines must be adopted before developers can bid on the property because of a particular arrangement the federal government requires of this site. The GSA, the federal office responsible for securing land for a new complex, must offload underperforming assets (like the J. Edgar Hoover Building) before acquiring new ones. The developer will take a risk in buying this property because the exchange must occur before what can be built on the property is absolutely final.

Finally, the developer’s plans will go though the city’s design review boards. Developers willing to endure a potentially Kafka-esque wait will be rewarded with prime land on the capital’s most prestigious avenue.

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