Open data from Transport for London spurs 3D axonometric plans of the Tube so passengers can mentally map their next trip

City Terrain Design International Transportation
(Courtesy Wikimedia Commons)

(Courtesy Wikimedia Commons)

Now you can strategize your next rush-hour skedaddle through the labyrinthine London Underground ahead of time—and choose all the right shortcuts. Transport for London (TfL) has released a series of 3D axonometric maps of the world’s oldest tube network, following a Freedom of Information Act (FoIA) request by Londoner Georges Vehres.

(Courtesy Wikimedia Commons)

(Courtesy Wikimedia Commons)

While revealing the sheer intricacy of the Underground’s tunnels and the country’s longest escalator at north London’s Angel station, the set of 124 maps documenting stations A through W are not to scale, as becomes obvious by the unrealistically steep stairwells. Passengers can now devise a mental map of their most frequently-used stations.

(Courtesy Transport for London)

(Courtesy Transport for London)

(Courtesy Transport for London)

(Courtesy Transport for London)

(Courtesy Transport for London)

(Courtesy Transport for London)

(Courtesy Transport for London)

(Courtesy Transport for London)

TfL’s release of a trove of public transport data following the FoIA spurred London-based visual developer Bruno Imbrizi to create 3D maps of his own that display the movements of all trains in the London Underground in real-time in brilliant color.

Technically, the data is real-time accurate only from the moment you load the map, as it represents a prediction from TfL for the next 30 minutes of activity. Trains take the shape of shifting rectangles along a lace-like lattice of tunnels, disappearing and reappearing behind orbs representing each station to the tune of a soothing underground soundtrack.

(Courtesy Bruno Imbrizi)

Screenshot of 3D map by Bruno Imbrizi

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