Preserving the Legacy of Architect Andrew Geller

Pearlroth House, Westhampton Beach, New York, 1958 (Courtesy Jake Gorst)

Pearlroth House, Westhampton Beach, New York, 1958 (Courtesy Jake Gorst)

[ Editor’s Note: Jake Gorst, documentary filmmaker and grandson of Andrew Geller has submitted this guest post relating preservation efforts to save the architect’s archive. ]

Efforts are currently underway to catalog and preserve architect Andrew Geller’s architectural archive, which consists of hundreds of drawings, thousands of photographs and pieces of correspondence, and several scale models. To preserve this archive, a film on Geller’s work and the preservation process is currently under production. The archive will ultimately end up at an academic facility for future generations to study.

Elizabeth Reese House, 1955, Sagaponack, New York (Courtesy Jake Gorst)

Elizabeth Reese House, 1955, Sagaponack, New York (Courtesy Jake Gorst)

Geller is best known for his freelance iconic mid-century beach house architecture along the coasts of New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut. His 1955 Elizabeth Reese House, built in Sagaponack, New York, was widely publicized and is credited with propelling the A-frame structure into mainstream American culture. His 1958 Pearlroth House in Westhampton, New York, has become a well known symbol of mid-century vacation living. As vice president of Raymond Loewy’s Housing and Home Products division during the 1960s he was also responsible for several innovative vacation and prefabricated housing concepts, including the widely publicized “Leisurama” homes of Montauk, New York.

The initiative is being crowd-funded through Kickstarter campaign. As an incentive to participate, contributors can earn Geller home tours, limited edition books, copies of the completed film, and other items. For more information, click here and make your contribution to preserve this important archive.

Pearlroth House, Westhampton Beach, New York, 1958 (Courtesy Jake Gorst)

Pearlroth House, Westhampton Beach, New York, 1958 (Courtesy Jake Gorst)

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