Posts tagged with "Zoos":

Coexist: Rethinking Zoos

· introduction ·  Future of zoos will be decided in the next few years. We are facing radical changes in the concept. Over the decades we have been proved that animal captivity, in most cases in terrible conditions, has affected badly their quality of life and their expected lifetime. The raison d’être and the welfare of the more than 3.5 million animals that they contain around the world are increasingly questioned. These places, emerged between the eighteenth and nineteenth century, deeply linked to colonialism and the discovery of new worlds, must evolve adapting to the new needs. The question is how to do so.  · a change of direction ·  Over time, zoos mission has evolved, from being just collections of animals, a symbol of power and greatness of many empires, almost exclusively for the enjoyment of the population, to fulfill other objectives. This evolution goes hand in hand with a growing scientific interest and greater possibilities for research and study. This growing respect for the animals around us means that more and more people are working to look after and maximize animal welfare. · challenge · Archstorming is calling for proposals to create an infrastructure that rethinks the zoo concept and gives it a twist, this time thinking about animals and their conservation over the exhibition to humans. The project is located in the current Zoo of Barcelona. The animal species that will be located in the zoo, as well as their distribution, will be at the discretion of the participant. In the same way, the reuse or elimination of the current infrastructures of the Barcelona Zoo will also be optional. · deadlines · JANUARY​ 15th       EARLY REGISTRATION OPENS     (40€/team)* FEBRUARY 14th      EARLY REGISTRATION CLOSES    (40€/team)* FEBRUARY 15th      REGULAR REGISTRATION OPENS     (60€/team)* MARCH 14th     REGULAR REGISTRATION CLOSES    (60€/team)* MARCH 15th     ADVANCED REGISTRATION OPENS     (80€/team)* APRIL 18th      SUBMISSION DEADLINE MAY 3rd      WINNERS ANNOUNCED · prizes · Prizes totaling 5.700€, broken down as follows: 1st PRIZE - 4.000 € 2nd PRIZE - 1.000€ 3rd PRIZE - 500€ PEOPLE’S CHOICE AWARD - 200€ + 10 honorable mentions
Placeholder Alt Text

The Detroit Zoo opens Albert Kahn Associates-designed Penguin Habitat

The Detroit Zoo in Royal Oaks, Michigan has built a new home for some of its most discerning residents. The new $30 million Polk Penguin Conservation Center is a state of the art immersive habitat for the zoo’s 80 penguins. At 33,000 square feet, the iceberg-shaped building is the largest penguin conservation center in the world. Designed by Detroit-based Albert Kahn Associates, the center includes a 25-foot-deep, 326,000-gallon aquatic area, in which zoo visitors can view the penguins from two underwater tunnels. The penguin habitat makes up over two thirds of the project. The new aquatic area, which is 10 times the size of their current space, is so large that the penguins can leap out of the water and deep dive. The experience for humans is similarly immersive, including video projections and sound effects simulating an Antarctic Ocean voyage. The zoo is anticipating overwhelming crowds to the new exhibit, so timed-entry passes will be issued on a first-come, first-serve basis at the zoo’s admissions gates. The zoo will also maintain extended hours for the first three weekends the center is open: April 23–24, April 30–May 1, and May 7–8.

Placeholder Alt Text

Archtober Building of the Day 9> Staten Island Zoo Carousel Enclosure

Staten Island Zoo Carousel Enclosure 614 Broadway, Staten Island Slade Architecture Our intrepid Archtober team ventured across the New York Bay to usher in the weekend with a visit to the Staten Island Zoo. After a breezy ferry ride (along with some time on the subway, bus, and our own two feet), we met up with James Slade, who, together with his wife and partner Hayes Slade, designed the Staten Island Zoo Carousel Enclosure. Ken Mitchell, zoo director, stopped by to give us some information about the zoo, which opened in 1936 and had 190,000 visitors last year. A master plan developed by Gruzen Samton had called for the carousel to be located near one of the zoo’s entrances, but James and Hayes decided instead to site it closer to the central building and facilities, near the children’s zoo and reptile house, two highlights of the facility. The Department of Cultural Affairs manages the buildings and zoo, while the Parks Department owns the land. All parties involved agreed that it was important to minimize impact on the landscape, which includes many mature trees. They avoided deep excavation work by setting the carousel enclosure on a diamond pier foundation system in which metal pins are hammered into a base to create a pincushion effect. Only one tree was lost to the carousel, leaving a verdant canopy above. Young riders can look up and see the sky through the ETFE roof, which lets in light so that passersby can admire the fine craftsmanship that went into the hand-carved and hand-painted wooden animals. An ingenious system of sliding glass panels allows the carousel to be used year-round. Mark Lombardi, facilities director at the zoo, is especially pleased with its design. He appreciates that in addition to being beautiful, the system is also easily maintainable. The panels slide into place with little effort, and they help keep the environment comfortable in all weather conditions. A playful custom frit pattern alerts visitors to the presence of the enclosure, which might otherwise fade from view, which is exactly the structure’s purpose. As Slade remarked, “it’s a building, but it’s really about having the building disappear to highlight the carousel inside.” The leopards looked like they wanted some attention, so Slade took us over to see the enclosure that his firm had also designed. After spending most of their lives in an indoor exhibit, the leopards are finally free to roam outside in their spacious new home, which was created with environmental enrichment in mind. Climbable trees and deadfall encourage mental stimulation and physical health, while a heated rock by the observation area provides a cozy spot in cold weather. When the leopards want to get away from human eyes, they can retreat to hiding places that were designed into the space. We’ll be back in Staten Island next week to see the newly-opened Staten Island Museum at Snug Harbor. Join us tomorrow for Editions de Parfums Frédéric Malle by Steven Holl Architects Julia Cohen is the Archtober Coordinator at the Center for Architecture.