Posts tagged with "Zaha Hadid Architects":

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Weston Williamson + Partners to design massive "Science City" in Egypt

London-based studio Weston Williams+Partners (WW+P) beat out Zaha Hadid Architects (ZHA) and others to win the commission for Cairo's "Science City." To be officially known as the “6th of October City,” the project will cover 1,345,490 square feet is located 20 miles west of Cairo's city center. The city will be a national institute for scientific innovation. Run by the Library of Alexandria institution, the competition's jury panel included American architect Michael Sorkin. Its brief called for "a set of buildings and spaces that will be inspiring inside and out, and express a particular vision of the quest for knowledge and the pursuit of science."

In a press release, Chris Williamson, one of the Founders of WW+P said: “We are proud to have won. Needless to say that Egypt has a unique cultural heritage, but we were also attracted by the ambition of the project, clearly expressed through the brief. We look forward to developing the design and creating something worthy for Egypt’s future generations.”

Zaha Hadid Architects, meanwhile, came third in the competition. Here are the results, courtesy of Building Design"

1: Weston Williamson & Partners, U.K. 2: Ngiom Partnership, Malaysia 3: Zaha Hadid Architects, U.K. 4: Gansam Architects, Korea Honourable mention: Petras Architecture & XCON Housos, Greece Honourable mention: Joaquim Caetano de Lima Filho, Daniel Henrique Ribeiro, Giliarde Silva, Guilherme Oliveira, Raissa Shizue and Lucas Moretti (Brazil) Honourable mention: Francisco Jorquera, Spain Honourable mention: Whitespace Architects, Dubai
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Zaha Hadid's 2007 Serpentine Pavilion is now on show at Chatsworth House in the U.K.

In July 2007, Zaha Hadid came to rescue when plans for that year's Serpentine pavilion faltered. Steel prices were on the rise and the pavilion's realization, designed by Danish-Icelandic artist Olafur Eliasson and Norwegian architect Kjetil Thorsen, stalled. The Lilas Installation, designed by the late British-Iraqi architect and Patrik Schumacher, stood in its place for nine days at the Serpentine Gallery in London. Nine years on, the Lilas Installation is now on show in gardens of Chatsworth House in Derbyshire, England. The installation is the showpiece of the yearly Beyond Limits sculpture exhibition put on show at Chatsworth by the auction house Sotheby's. The Lilas Installation is currently up for sale (with no price specified). It covers 3,336 square feet and rises 18 feet high—not quite small enough for a suburban back garden. For comparison, Sou Fujimoto's 2013 pavilion was sold for a reported $653,900. Julia Peyton-Jones was the Serpentine director in 2007. “It was one of those little miracles,” she said, remembering the moment. “It was uncomfortable to be in the position of not having a pavilion on time that year—[but] stuff happens and it is how you deal with it that is the major issue. As a result, we had this gorgeous project that was unexpected and it was an absolute little gem… so typical in its simplicity and so relevant to her work.” Once again, Hadid and Schumacher's creation is open to the public. A stately home in the U.K.'s midlands, Chatsworth House is set among the countryside and has an extensive array of public and private gardens. Its history spans back to the 16th century when the original house was built in 1553. In 1568, the house even was used to hold custody of Mary Queen of Scots. Today, visitors can pay just over $20 to tour the gardens and view the Lilas Installation before it is eventually sold. Originally, the work had been planned to be unveiled at Chatsworth before Hadid's passing. “It is very poignant,” said Peyton-Jones. “But all the more marvelous that this masterwork should be presented to remind us what an extraordinary contribution she made.” Simon Stock, senior director at Sotheby's and curator of the show at Chatsworth, spoke of how the 2007 work will fit into its historic setting. "They don’t clash, they complement in a way the pyramid does at the Louvre," he said. "It is a very beguiling structure, it draws you in, it is an extraordinary thing”. “Is it principally sculptural?" Stock questioned, attempting to describe the installation. "Is it a piece of architecture... do you see it was a building, in other words? Do you see it as something organic that has grown out of the ground? It is all of those things combined.” Lilas Installation at the Serpentine Gallery © Zaha Hadid Architects from Zaha Hadid Architects on Vimeo.
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Patrik Schumacher on starchitecture: "It's just not helpful... We don't want to be stars"

When Zaha Hadid passed away this March, many questioned the future of her practice, Zaha Hadid Architects (ZHA). As its leader, the Iraq-born British architect had played a starring role in the international design scene. Since her passing, ZHA has continued with Patrik Schumacher, the firm's only former partner, at its helm. Schumacher spoke with AN's Senior Editor Matt Shaw about what the future holds for ZHA, the impact of starchitecture, progressive urbanism, and more.

The Architect's Newspaper: How will ZHA continue? Do you feel like you have a good team behind you? 

Patrik Schumacher: Oh absolutely we have a great team [and] many layers of people who have been with us for many, many years. A lot of them are former students of mine. There’s a...much-shared sensibility and set of values—let’s say the DNA of the firm—deeply embedded in everybody’s way of working. It's also not just about being ambitious about ZHA, but being ambitious about giving leadership to the discipline as a whole. This is something I’ve been doing through my writings and attempting to do. There’s also the effort to overcome some of the prejudice, which the firm has faced through some of its critics.

What do you make of ZHA's criticisms?

I think this is based on a lack of understanding of our motivations. I’m trying to address this and I want to be more open to engagement with critics [by] explaining what we’re really about. We don’t want to be stars. We don’t want to become rich quick. We’re not insensitive to social and political issues. We actually share a lot with those critical of our work, critics who sometimes seem to take the moral high ground. What we all share, and should be expected to share as a basis for conversation, is a commitment to societal development, progress, emancipation, freedom, prosperity, and attempt to make architecture relevant to [the] development of the city and society. These kinds of shared motivations should be a basis for a conversation, [one that] also respects that maybe we see clients differently. We at ZHA see society's development differently and I’m willing to talk about my optimism for more market-based organization processes and entrepreneurial solutions to societal problems. Solutions to maybe what we can perceive to be certain economic statements and stagnation in recent years. 

Do you think that as the discussion around Zaha Architects changes from one of a star to a system there will be a change?

I think it’s very important because the starchitecture discourse, when the phrase comes up, always has negative connotations of superficiality, celebrity cult, etc. It was very unhelpful to us and certainly not something we or even Zaha was ever aiming for. It’s just not helpful. People become well-known because of a certain merit, because of an inspirational flavor and input of their work into the field. It is generated initially within the discipline through a form of peer recognition before being carried out into the public at large. At that point, some of the reasons why a person became well known get lost and you just have a free floating celebrity. That’s not helping. I don’t think that I’m aspiring to this, nor would I achieve this. At ZHA, we want to focus more on the ideas, principles, and, of course, with respect to society at large and the clients [with whom] we had established a reputation. Colleagues and critics should be able to realize that this is not only a superficial reputation, but a reputation which has reasons to back it up.

I’ve been saying that the discourse on icons is misguided in many ways. Iconography, in a positive sense, is something that becomes conspicuous because it’s innovative and has been rigorously developed from principles. Conspicuity, recognizability, and strangeness can be seen as side-effects even when the act of being iconic is not the driver or the original motif. Instead, it’s a temporary inevitability.

If you look at the Seagram building in New York when it arrived on the scene in the 1950s, it had the shock of a different form of "new." It was incredibly iconic and of a totally new civilization. However, this is only a temporary condition. Now the city has been remade in its image and you hardly notice it. Only architects who are aware of this notice. That is the way we should look at some of our work. As temporarily conspicuous and not necessarily something which we are craving for. Our work is not meant to be a spectacle and this is important to realize because it can very easily become a target for icon and star bashing. This is incredibly unhelpful because it’s no longer talking about the merit and demerit the of the work, its arguments, and the innovative thrust of a project, but rather its superficial celebrity status.  

Do you see the parametricism as being the "next modernism?"

Yes, though they have very different technological social paradigms. This civilization has evolved into a new condition and, as a result, the built environment is bound to change with it. In fact, it has been continuously changing but in ways which the discipline so far hasn’t impacted it sufficiently. If parametricism does not become hegemonic like modernism was in the 1960s, then it means that the discipline has become impotent. Currently, we have retro styles like neo-rationalism dominating construction in London and that simply means that the last 50 years of architectural research development made no impact at all. You might as well have shut down all organs of architectural criticism or schools of architecture or biennials because they came to zero. 

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Zaha Hadid pays homage to Kurt Schwitters's Merzbau for exhibition at Zurich's Galerie Gmurzynska

The projects Zaha Hadid worked on before her death earlier this year are, one by one, being revealed to the public. First, plans were revealed for a new residential building in Manhattan. Now, Zaha Hadid Architects (ZHA) has revealed a Hadid-designed exhibition space for Kurt Schwitters: Merz, a retrospective of Schwitters's work at Galerie Gmurzynska in Zurich. The space is a homage to the German artist's Merzbau, the gradual, surreal transformation of a suite of rooms in his family's Hannover home. The Merzbau was constructed between 1923 and 1933, but destroyed in a 1943 Allied bombing raid. The Sprengel Museum Hannover has reconstructed one of the rooms as part of its permanent exhibition. “This design process is capable of delivering an intricate order, open ended and unpredictable, but at any time highly articulate. It is full of contingencies, but forges a unique, path-dependent identity,” explained Patrik Schumacher, director of ZHA, in a press release. For a previous collaboration with Galerie Gmurzynska, Hadid honored painter Kasimir Malevich by selecting Suprematist work by Russian avant-garde artists to pair with her architecture for the gallery. This show features 70 Schwitters works across all media arrayed in a curving, warped white space that distorts the viewer's sense of scale. The gallery is in the same building complex that once hosted Galerie Dada, the alternative space run by artists Tristan Tzara and Hugo Ball. Adrian Notz, director of Cabaret Voltaire, where Dada was born in 1916, will curate archival documents that show Schwitters’s forays into stage design, theater, sound, and poetry, pursuits that complement his visual work. A book to accompany Kurt Schwitters: Merz will feature writing by Museum Ludwig director Siegfried Gohr, Schumacher, Notz, and others. The show runs through September 30. Additional information on exhibition hours and special events can be found here.
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One of Hadid's last designs to be built in Chelsea

One of the last designs from late British-Iraqi architect Zaha Hadid will be realized in New York. Working with developers The Moinian Group, Hadid and her firm Zaha Hadid Architects (ZHA) were commissioned more than a year ago to provide apartments and space for a "world-class" cultural institution at 220 Eleventh Avenue in West Chelsea, Manhattan.

“We must invest in cultural spaces—they are a vital component of a rich urban life and cityscape, they unite the city and tie the urban fabric together,” said Hadid in 2015.  

Hadid's long-term colleague and Partner at ZHA Patrik Schumacher spoke of the firm's joy to be working in a city that played a big part in Hadid's life. “As the world celebrates Zaha’s remarkable legacy," he said in a press release, "we are delighted to be announcing her unique collaboration with The Moinian Group for New York, a city that greatly influenced her creative work.”

Hadid's design aims to evoke the loft-like residences that are commonplace in the Chelsea. A coterie of penthouse apartments and a cultural institution will also be embedded into the project. At the time of writing, The Moinian Group are in talks with institutions regarding residency at the site.

“We are deeply honored to develop one of Zaha’s final creations and cement her astonishing legacy forevermore here in Manhattan. She was a special woman and a friend who we all miss very much,” said Mitchell Moinian of The Moinian Group.

The Moinian Group's release mentions that Hadid visited New York many times and was able to develop an understanding of the city, its values and architectural heritage. As a result, the Group said, much of Manhattan's vernacular typologies and the area's way of life have formed her design and approach for 220 Eleventh Avenue.

Set to break ground at the start of next year, sales for housing units are currently in line to begin toward the end of 2017. Images of the project have not yet been revealed but you can find images of her other New York project on the High Line here.

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Peter Cook's Obituary of Zaha Hadid

THE MEMORY OF ZAHA

Zaha : the Great Light extinguished. From every point of view exceptional : As a direct, original, fearless personality. With a more than adequate supply of charm and humour. Used with more discretion than blandness. IMMENSE talent. Such that it either inspired, bewildered, or caused deep jealousy (that manifest itself in lesser talent to pick away at her motives, reputation or personality)

Thirteen years ago, the other Giant : Cedric Price, died. Different animal, but leaving a similar void. London – and the architecture world – now seems lost : we are now berift of that most precious and mysterious quality : power through inspiration and talent plus bags of personality that rendered both of them as beacons of hope for architecture. ‘Sticking to one’s guns’ is an amazing gift. Zaha told it as it is : she had the priority of a clear, powerful and ever-poetic architecture. Many tried to copy it but lacked her deftness of line. And the line was MORE than a line : it so easily and frequently resulted in a spatial exploration of extraordinary newness : the wonder of the interior of the Alyev Centre in Baku remains in one’s mind as a dream. The sharp, clean, razor-like dart of the Vitra Fire Station has the purity of an ‘early period’ Zaha building – but you’re actually inside it, living the dream of the drawing. From the first years when this conspicuously talented recent student became the lively attachment to Rem Koolhaas and Elia Zenghelis’ young OMA setup, you were aware of a strength of talent bursting out. Her trajectory and example stands there beckoning the many women (now maybe a majority) who work in architecture : if she can do it, they can do it . Let’s hope one or two of them out there can blend talent with personality – the latter gift being a necessary factor in order to sustain the pressure in this, most contrary, profession. A loyal friend who could also be a good laugh. Peter Cook 4.1.16 Editor's note: This piece will also appear in The Architectural Review.
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Updates on Zaha Hadid's passing and our December interview with her

UPDATE: Please read Sir Peter Cook's obituary of Zaha Hadid here. As the Architect's Newspaper (AN) reported earlier today, Zaha Hadid has passed away at age 65. According the Guardian, she was struck with fatal heart attack in a Miami hospital where she was being treated for bronchitis. In 2004, Dame Zaha Hadid, DBE, became the first woman to receive the Pritzker Architecture Prize. She was awarded the Stirling Prize in 2010 and 2011 as well as the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) gold medal in 2016. The Iraqi-born architect studied at London's Architectural Association (AA) from 1972-1977 and afterwards became a partner at OMA. In 1979 she established her eponymous London-based firm that would go on to produce a wide range of projects, including skyscrapers, art galleries, furniture, sets, and shoes, just to name a few. In a release forwarded to AN, Tom Pritzker, Chairman of the Hyatt Foundation which sponsors the Pritzker Architecture Prize, wrote "Zaha represented the highest aspirations of the Pritzker Architecture Prize. She combined her vision and intellect with a force of personality that left no room for complacency. She made a real difference." Lord Peter Palumbo, the Chair of the Jury of the Pritzker Architecture Prize, said "The world of culture has lost a standard-bearer for the art of architecture. Zaha Hadid fought prejudice all her life with great success. And this, in addition to her genius as an architect, will secure her legacy for all time." This past December 2015, AN's managing editor Olivia Martin had the chance to speak with Hadid at the Chicago Architecture Biennial. AN invites you to revisit that interview here. Speaking of her own architectural style, she said "It evolved over time and is always evolving. It looks similar, but it constantly changes… maybe not radically, but continuously." Recent project from her firm included this hotel in Rio de Janeiro, her first project in South America, and these residences near New York City's High Line. AN will continue to cover her passing with a full obituary in the near future.  
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Planned as a hotel, Zaha Hadid's first project in South America is now a luxury residence

Zaha Hadid, with Arup and Mello Affonso Engineering, is executing her first project in South America. Casa Atlantica is a luxury residential building in Copacabana Beach, Rio de Janeiro. According to ARUP, Casa Atlantica was originally planned as a luxury hotel but changed to a residential building in order to meet the region's urban standards. The client, Brazilian entrepreneur Omar Peres, gave Hadid complete design liberty. She was, however, governed by strict requirements on height and proximity to neighbors. Zaha Hadid Architects' explained their response to these constraints: "Working within site restrictions governing the height and distance from adjacent buildings, Casa Atlantica's design establishes a fluid order defined by its structure which morphs and expands at each level to create balconies, while also dividing each floor into separate residential units." Casa Atlanta will be 18,000 feet-squared, have 12 floors, feature a rooftop swimming pool, and reach approximately 130 feet in height. Construction is set to begin in March. For further information, visit Zaha Hadid Architects' project page here.  
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Kengo Kuma claims commission for Tokyo Olympic Stadium as Hadid fumes

At last, design for the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Stadium has finally been decided with Kengo Kuma's winning commission. The Japanese firm fought off a plan by Toyo Ito to claim the prize. Zaha Hadid, however, was less than complimentary of the decision. The 80,000 capacity stadium will cost $1.2 billion, almost half the cost of Hadid's proposal and will crucially be constructed by Taisei Corp, a major firm in Japan. That's not to say that decision isn't still mired in controversy. Nicknamed the "hamburger," several architects, according to the Financial Times, claim it bears “remarkable similarities” to a an earlier design that was scrapped in July. Utilizing a wood and steel roof, Kuma's design creates a green space within the city of Tokyo with the facade’s horizontal lines seemingly referencing the 1,300-year-old Gojunoto wooden pagoda at Horyuji Temple. Meanwhile the environment is completed via the implementation of Jingu Shrine trees and other foliage found within the vicinity of the stadium. Prime Minister Shinzo Abe spoke of the design, saying "I think this is a wonderful plan that meets criteria such as basic principles, construction period and cost," when he announced the winning practice. Hadid, though, has other ideas. “Sadly the Japanese authorities, with the support of some of those from our own profession in Japan, have colluded to close the doors on the project to the world,” Zaha Hadid Architect's said in statement. "This shocking treatment of an international design and engineering team ... was not about design or budget." "In fact much of our two years of detailed design work and the cost savings we recommended have been validated by the remarkable similarities of our original detailed stadium layout and our seating bowl configuration with those of the design announced today," she continued. Completion is set to be around November 2019, though there are doubts that it will be ready in time for the Rugby World Cup that Japan is hosting that year. This was initially a requirement that was demanded by the Japan Sports Council and one that Hadid says her firm would have been able to meet. “Work would already be under way building the stadium if the original design team had simply been able to develop this original design, avoiding the increased costs of an 18-month delay and risk that it may not be ready in time for the 2020 Games.” Meanwhile, president of Tokyo 2020, Yoshiro Mori, has said, “The stadium incorporates the views of experts in the construction field and we are looking forward very much to using the new stadium as the centrepiece of the Tokyo 2020 Games.”
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Sleek renderings show what it's like to live in Zaha Hadid's luxurious 520 West 28th Street in New York

Renowned architect Zaha Hadid has unveiled interior renderings of her futuristic, 11-story residential development located at 520 West 28th Street in New York's Chelsea neighborhood, which, believe it or not, is her first residential building in the Big Apple. The curvaceous tower stands 135 feet tall and features two- to five-bedroom floor plans that range from a price tag of $4.95 million to $50 million. The tower will be outfitted with a 2,500-square-foot sculpture deck, art from Friends of the High Line, an automated underground parking lot with a robot-operated storage facility, a double-height lobby, an entertainment lounge, and a 12-seat IMAX screening room. The development will also include a 75-foot pool, a gym, and a luxury spa suite equipped with a spa pool, cold plunge pool, waterfall shower, sauna, steam room, chaise lounges, and massage beds.   The unit’s bathrooms will be comprised of electrochromic glass with a frosting feature, and the kitchens will include high-end appliances by Gaggenau. The new complex is slated to open in late 2016 or early 2017. Based on the complex's website, it looks like developers are looking to "casually" add Hadid's name to the building title. Perhaps, following the lead of New York By Gehry? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below.  
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Zaha Hadid becomes first woman to win the UK's Royal Gold Medal for Architecture

The RIBA Gold Medal joins an ever-growing list of accomplishments for Baghdad-born, London-based Zaha Hadid. Hadid has been racking up the landmark achievements for women in architecture, most notably becoming the first female winner of the Pritzker Architecture Prize in 2004. She also twice won the UK's Stirling Prize, for the MAXXI art museum in Rome and for the Brixton-based Evelyn Grace Academy. Her achievements in the UK are widely recognized as in 2012 she was made a Dame Commander of the British Empire for achievements in architecture.Hadid started her practice in 1979 in London under the name Zaha Hadid Architects. Speaking of the award, RIBA president Jane Duncan said: ''Zaha Hadid is a formidable and globally influential force in architecture." ''Highly experimental, rigorous and exacting, her work from buildings to furniture, footwear and cars is quite rightly revered and desired by brands and people all around the world," Duncan said in a statement. "I am delighted Zaha will be awarded the Royal Gold Medal in 2016 and can't wait to see what she and her practice will do next.'' After being personally approved by the Queen for the esteemed prize, Dame Hadid spoke to BBC Radio 4 speaking about the reduction of sexism in the industry. ''There are more women architects practicing and doing great projects... I think the stigma has lifted,'' she said. ''I think there are areas where as a woman you cannot sort of be there ... But I think it is a lot better.''