Posts tagged with "Yves Béhar":

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Turn on, tune in, get connected: 6 smart home devices

We are becoming increasingly digitally connected to the things around us and, in turn, the spaces that we occupy. Virtually any device with an on-off switch can become part of a network of connected things, from security systems to dishwashers. On this page, you’ll find the latest IoT-compatible devices and new releases from 2018's Kitchen and Bath Industry Show and the Consumer Electronics Show. Tomato+ Boffi
Producing freshly grown herbs and vegetables all year, Tomato+ is an indoor vegetable garden with gusto! Inside, the LED lighting system reproduces cyclical day-to-night natural lighting and houses seedling pods on biodegradable trays. With the app, users can control the climate remotely and order parts to actualize their very own garden scheme.
Nest x Yale Lock Yale
Nest, the purveyor of digital security systems and connected home devices, collaborated with Yale Locks on a key-free touchscreen deadbolt smart lock. The Nest x Yale Lock allows remote unlocking and passcode unlocking (it holds up to 250 passwords), which can be set to specific times of the day for those with limited access. The app also connects to other Nest safety devices, like the video doorbell and security system, so users can deactivate the alarm as you open the door and see people remotely when they arrive.
MODEL 3 Water Heater Heatworks
It’s electric! The MODEL 3 is an internet-connected, tankless water heater that churns out unlimited hot water at any desired temperature (saving that water you normally waste waiting for it to warm up). Through the app, users can monitor how much hot water and energy are used, select favorite temperature profiles, and even limit the length of a child’s shower time. View by Yves Béhar Hive
Yves Béhar designed this indoor smart camera with portability in mind. The cube-shaped camera snaps off the stand so it can monitor any area in the house. Through the app, 24-hour surveillance is securely livestreamed in 1080p HD. It can be programmed to detect people only, so there aren’t ongoing notifications about the family cat. The camera is available in black and brushed copper or white and champagne gold (shown), and it can attach to freestanding or wall-mounted stands.
Verdera Voice Lighted Mirror Kohler
Magic mirror on the wall, can you connect me to the conference call? This LED-dimmable voice-activated mirror is equipped with Amazon Alexa, with voice-activated controls that seamlessly connect to your other devices and apps. It is offered in three width varieties: 24, 34, and 40 inches.
Wisp Digital Blinds iGlass Technology
By way of a digital current that is applied to a transparent, flexible, and durable film, these digital blinds fully tint windows from light to dark within 20 seconds, effectively reducing heat, UV rays, and glare. Wisp is installed on the inside surface of any existing window, adding a digital layer that is wireless and IoT-enabled.
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MIT’s Media Lab produces robotic modular furniture for living in tight spaces

Hailing from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Media Lab, Ori is a range of adaptable homeware and furniture designed to maximize the potential of small spaces. With its name coming from the Japanese word "origami," the furniture system combines robotics, architecture, and design to let interiors double-up as bedrooms, living rooms, dining rooms, and offices. Teaming up with Swiss product designer Yves Béhar, founder and CEO of Ori and research scientist at MIT Hasier Larrea has his eyes set on fundamentally altering the "experience and economics of the urban built environment." Speaking in a press release, Larrea added that "Ori’s systems make possible the effortless and magical transformation of interior spaces, providing the totally new experience of having our interior space intelligently conform to our activities, rather than our activities being forced to conform to our interior space." The firm argues that contemporary urban dwellings have become overtly static and unresponsive, an inefficiency that is ill-affordable in today's housing climate. A movable mainframe, containing a variety of concealable furniture and storage, is the core concept in Ori's modular and mechatronic furniture. Using the wall mounted control panel, the module can move across the floor and deploy different pieces of furniture. This can all be done remotely through the Ori app as well (perfect for if you want your space to be ready for an impromptu party.) With words such as "mechatronic," "modular," and "efficiency" being banded around, it would be easy to assume that such a system has aesthetics as an afterthought. That, however, is where Yves Béhar comes in. While being part of the functional design process, Ori's quality of finish makes it an appealing addition to dwellings that are hard-pressed on floor space. In a design statement, Béhar says:
Cities such as London, Seattle, San Francisco and almost everywhere else are seeing an influx of young professionals, yet those urban centers are more expensive and more condensed. People are seeking smaller living spaces as an economic opportunity, and while it meshes well with notions of sustainability, the question Ori is tackling is: how do we accommodate a living room, bedroom, closet and office space in a small 200-300 square feet apartment? While these micro living spaces enable developers to provide more housing options and allow renters and buyers affordability and a smaller carbon footprint, they clearly lack the need for life's different accommodations that larger apartments provide. While some may view these small spaces as a necessity, a group of MIT engineers saw this as an opportunity – how do we maximize our use of these spaces, providing the experience of luxury living without the luxury of size? Better yet, what if your living space could physically transform to create any environment you need? We teamed up with Ori to design a system of robotic furniture: transformable units that can triple the usage of a given space.
While not on the market just yet, inquiries can be made via Ori's website here.
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Hot Topic: Yves Béhar’s new thermostat design the latest in a growing line of smart home gadgets

The once-prosaic thermostat has become a high profile design object as of late. As a critical gateway for the "Internet of Things" and the world of the connected home, it's increasingly seen as an HVAC status symbol. With his new scheme for the Hive for British Gas, Yves Béhar takes a step back from the fray and focuses on the unit's ease of use. Compared to the first learning thermostat, Nest, and its smart-home spawn, Hive takes a low-key approach to aesthetics—but does so via some fairly fancy interface technology. Until it is touched, the face of the unit remains a blank, mirror-like surface. Changeable frames for the Hive (above) work to bring the user into the experience and put them in control of the device—not vice versa. Nest's hardware and interface are resolutely minimalist—indisputably a factor in its success in the marketplace (it's estimated that 10,000 units are sold every day)—but graphically, it's more heavy-handed and generic. The Ecobee3 wi-fi thermostat features remote mini-monitors that track the temperature in more than one room of the house. Occupancy sensors help save energy and reduce operating costs. The device's rounded corners and a cutesy insect icon convey an emphasis less on science and more on everyday accessibility. From the originator of the original Round thermostat (which was designed by Henry Dreyfuss), the Lyric has geofencing capability, which enables the device to adjust automatically, based on the location of the user's smartphone. By inverting the dome profile of Dreyfuss' 1953 icon, the design pays homage to a classic while supporting today's technology.