Posts tagged with "Young Architects Program":

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Meet the finalists for the 2018 MoMA PS1 Young Architects Program

The finalists for the 2018 Young Architects Program (YAP) have been announced by the Museum of Modern Art and MoMA PS1. Each year, 30 young practices are nominated by deans of architecture schools and editors of architecture publications for a chance to compete to build a temporary outdoor installation in the courtyard of MoMA PS1. After a portfolio review, the initial group of 30 is culled down to five firms, who are asked to submit initial proposals for the project. This year’s finalists are LeCavalier R+D, FreelandBuck, OFICINAA, BairBalliet, and Jennifer Newsom & Tom Carruthers. The 2017 winner of YAP was Jenny E. Sabin with her project Lumen, which employed a web-like woven canopy made of photo-luminescent and solar-active yarns that collected  and emitted light. Learn more about each of the 2018 finalists below. BairBalliet BairBalliet is a collaborative effort between Chicago-based Kelly Bair and Los Angeles-based Kristy Balliet. BairBalliet’s work was presented as part of the US Pavilion for the 2016 Venice Architecture Biennial. Along with co-founding BairBalliet, Kelly Bair is the principal of Central Standard Office of Design and is an assistant professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago’s School of Architecture. Kristy Balliet, principal of Balliet Studio, is currently faculty at the Southern California Institute of Architecture (SCI-Arc) and an associate professor at The Ohio State University’s Knowlton School of Architecture. Through both speculative and built work, the team explores precedent and form in two and three dimensions. FreelandBuck The bi-coastal FreelandBuck is led by David Freeland and Brennan Buck. Freeland is currently a faculty member at the Southern California Institute of Architecture (SCI-Arc), and Buck is a faculty member at the Yale School of Architecture. FreelandBuck’s work ranges from residential and commercial through urban and institutional projects, with an emphasis on complex digitally-fabricated geometries. Jennifer Newsom & Tom Carruthers Jennifer Newsom and Tom Carruthers make up the Minneapolis-based art and architecture practice DREAM THE COMBINE. As installation artists and licensed architects, the team has produced numerous site-specific installations in the United States and Canada.  Each project explores concepts of reality, perception, material, and often social and cultural constructs, such as race and metaphor. LeCavalier R+D New Jersey-based LeCavalier R+D is led by Jesse LeCavalier. Currently an assistant professor of architecture at the New Jersey Institute of Technology, LeCavalier is the former Sanders Fellow at the University of Michigan, a Poiesis Fellow at the Institute for Public Knowledge at NYU, and a researcher at the Singapore-ETH Future Cities Laboratory. With a focus on contemporary spaces of logistics, LeCavalier is the author of  The Rule of Logistics: Walmart and the Architecture of Fulfillment. OFICINAA Ingolstadt, Germany-based OFICINAA is a collaboration between Silvia Benedito and Alexander Häusler. With a wide range of work in different mediums and scales, OFICINAA draws on its principal’s diverse backgrounds to produce work that covers multiple facets of design. Benedito’s work often focuses on atmospheres and microclimate landscapes, while Häusler’s background is in sculpture and installation work. Together, they have produced everything from urban planning projects and architecture projects to installations and videos. The judging panel this year included: Glenn D. Lowry, Director of The Museum of Modern Art; Klaus Biesenbach, Director of MoMA PS1; Peter Reed, Senior Deputy Director for Curatorial Affairs; Martino Stierli, The Philip Johnson Chief Curator of Architecture and Design; Barry Bergdoll, Curator of Architecture and Design; Sean Anderson, Associate Curator of Architecture and Design; Jeannette Plaut and Marcelo Sarovic, Directors, CONSTRUCTO, from Santiago, Chile; and Pippo Ciorra, Senior Curator, MAXXI Architettura, of Rome, Italy. The winner will be announced in early 2018.
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First look at Jenny Sabin Studio’s immersive MoMA/PS1 installation

This year marks a new direction for the MoMA/PS1 Young Architects Program (YAP), and it shows in Jenny Sabin Studio’s Lumen, the series’ 18th annual installation. After a few years focused on creating awareness of ecological and sustainability issues, the program has taken a slightly different course, as the brief has expanded to include a more rigorous engagement with the popular Warm Up summer music series, now in its 20th season of sweaty, raucous parties in the museum’s courtyard. Set to open on June 29, the project features a woven canopy that will subtly change color in the daytime, and will glow in the dark and be illuminated at night. The large fabric shade system will address several of the programmatic issues of YAP that have fallen by the wayside in years past, including an integrated lighting system to accompany the musical acts, a misting system to cool visitors, and over 100 seats scattered across the courtyard. These features follow the ethos of YAP much more closely, which, according to its mission statement, is to provide “shade, seating, and water,” in addition to meeting its sustainability goals. To address these newly reinvigorated concerns, the designer set out to create an immersive environment, not an object. For Sabin, cells provide an ecological model for architecture, because cellular networks respond to their environments by morphing their structures, volumes, and surfaces to produce form through geometry and material. Alongside her experimental design practice, she is an assistant professor at Cornell University where she leads the hybrid research and design network LabStudio with Peter Lloyd Jones. The collaborative—based at Cornell University, the University of Pennsylvania, Stanford University, and in Los Angeles—includes extra-disciplinary actors like material scientists, cell biologists, matrix biologists, and physicists. In working with these professionals, she has developed a specialty in applied research and architecture that results from what she calls “active datascapes,” such as those found in biology, mathematics, or cellular biology. Research into biological processes has led Sabin—alongside collaborators such as the textile designers at Nike Flyknit Collective—to develop new tools and methods for prototyping and making, especially in the realm of fabric architecture. While these might seem like disparate areas of interest, knitting’s performance and flexibility allow concepts taken from cellular research to come alive through digital models and simulations that can respond to particularities in physical contexts. This is the framework from which Lumen arises. “In the context of emerging technologies and digital and robotic fabrication, one of the biggest shifts in the profession right now is that architects are being repositioned as makers,” Sabin said. “Historians such as Mario Carpo say that this hasn’t been the case since Medieval times." She also cites weaving workshops at the Bauhaus and their early proto-parametric attempts to link computation, geometry, and materiality as precursors to her work. At the Bauhaus, it was women’s labor that made innovative strides in textile manufacturing. Similarly, for Lumen, this new type of making—and new workers—digital tools and robots—have made it possible to produce much larger and intricate output. Labor is always an issue at ambitious experimental installations like MoMA/PS1 due to budget constraints and anything that can increase the effectiveness of the end result without increasing the need for volunteers is much welcomed. Lumen is tied with SO-IL’s 2010 Pole Dance for largest ever YAP structure in square footage covered—and thus shaded from the intense sun— in the courtyard. “I was confident about the amount of research and development that went in to this,” Sabin told AN, “So I felt comfortable pushing it to this scale.” Lumen produces effects through new materials and construction methods, most notable the use of two different high-tech responsive fibers. Elements knitted with SolarActive thread—one that changes when exposed to UV—will bring the white structure to life in different subtle hues of blue, orange, purple, and green. At sunset, these will be slowly joined by other cells that are made from photoluminescent (glow-in-the-dark) threads. Neither effect is overwhelming, but they are augmented by a light show that is integrated into the structure and will be programmed to change throughout the evening. To create the structure, roughly 250 standardized fabric cells using one million yards of thread were produced on digital knitting machines at Shima Seiki, a garment manufacturer that specializes in seam-free knitting technology. These cells—in three sizes—had the same circumference until they were fitted into the canopy, where they stretched to conform to the structural stress diagrams derived from shade and heat analyses of the courtyard. The knitted cells were then sewn together with a secondary structural webbing, which was mapped on a 1:1 scale plan drawing of the entire canopy. For structural support, three steel tensegrity towers provide support in the middle of the structure. The mast is in compression, but the load is carried by a post-tensioned rope system that was fabricated by a custom fish-net maker. Visitors can hang out on the platforms under the ropes, and beer tickets will be sold from inside the tower in the smaller side courtyard. Warm Up­–goers will also be able to find a set on one of 100 “spool stools,” which were produced by cutting old plywood spools into saw blade–like pinwheels, onto which a robot spun photoluminescent thread around the perimeter. Sitting will be an option again this year, and as users pass through Lumen, sensors in hanging cones (sometimes called stalactites) that will respond to their motion and emit clouds of mist that will cool people down as well as the change the microclimate of the courtyard. These organism-like features will allow the architecture to help to create multiple experiences and engagements that celebrates human interaction and change, as it will be different during daytime, sunset, and at night. This renewed focus on the programmatic opportunities of Warm Up will be fun, but the project also points to the continued evolution of advanced fabrication, as it starts to scales up, moves outside the gallery setting, and subsequently becomes more mainstream. As the generation of architects who pioneered these digital techniques over the last couple decades start to get really good at executing them at larger scales, we will see more of these projects living longer and in more influential settings. Additionally, the shift in the Young Architects Program from primarily ecological and sustainability issues to immersive qualities and experience is a welcome one. The courtyard provides a special context and programmatic challenge for elite architects to design for a world-class outdoor music event. Whether the discipline writ large will follow the same trend toward this type of engaging work is unclear, but due to its scale and immersive environment, Lumen serves as good starting point for understanding how physically present structures and environments can be leveraged to connect the public to architecture outside of the discipline or the gallery. PROJECT CREDITS A project by Jenny Sabin Studio Jenny E. Sabin, Principal and Lead Architectural Designer R&D + Digital Fabrication Sabin Design Lab, Cornell University Design Team Jenny E. Sabin, principal and lead architectural designer Dillon Pranger, project lead and manager Jordan Berta (content coordination), Diego Garcia Blanco, Elie Boutros, Daniel Villegas Cruz, Omar Dairi, Alejandro Garcia, Andres Gutierrez, Jingyang Liu Leo (senior research associate), Mark Lien, Jasmine Liu, Andrew Moorman, Christopher Morse, Bennett Norman, Marwan Omar, Sasson Rafailov, Steve Ren, David Rosenwasser, Danny Salamoun (production lead), Aishwarya Sreenivas, Raksarat Vorasucha Video Cole Skaggs Photography Yuriy Chernets Engineering design Clayton Binkley & Kristen Strobel, Arup Fabricators and installers Tom Carruthers, Bo Jacobsson, Erik Grinde, Mateo Baca, Jacobsson Carruthers, LLC Knit fabrication Tom Shintaku, Shima Seiki WHOLEGARMENT Lighting design Juan Pablo Lira and Hilary Manners, Focus Lighting Sewing and finishing Wade Wesson & Christine Garcia, Dazian Misting systems Sabin Design Lab & Mist Cooling Inc. The other finalists for this year’s MoMA PS1 Young Architects Program were Bureau Spectacular (Jimenez Lai and Joanna Grant), Ania Jaworska, Office of III (Sean Canty, Ryan Golenberg, and Stephanie Lin), and SCHAUM/SHIEH (Rosalyne Shieh and Troy Schaum). An exhibition of the five finalists' proposed projects will be on view at The Museum of Modern Art over the summer, organized by Sean Anderson, associate curator, with Arièle Dionne-Krosnick, curatorial assistant, Department of Architecture and Design, The Museum of Modern Art
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Winners of the Young Architects Program MAXXI merge theatrical sets, symbolism, and performance

Milanese practice Parasite 2.0 has won the Young Architects Program (YAP) MAXXI 2016 competition with its installation MAXXI Temporary School: The museum is a school. A School is a Battleground. In its sixth year, the program to recognize young architects with a pavilion commission was organized by MAXXI in conjunction with MoMA/MoMA PS1 of New York. Producing "mobile sets that erase the boundaries between natural and artificial," Parasite 2.0 was selected for its ability to reflect the notion that contemporary architecture is the creation of a "scene."  This is done explicitly via the use of wood, rubber, and metal, all composed to form a pop-art-esque movie set on wheels. Vibrant colors, flashing lights, and even cactii cut-outs give the project the distinctive feel of Las Vegas. Among the symbols that adorn Parasite 2.0's sets is a crying luminescent emoji. Meanwhile, over-exaggerated forms and objects take on a satirical tone. The mobile scene, said MAXXI, will be the "backdrop to the museum’s summer events and for the thousand-like selfies of its visitors, but also a reflection on the disappearance of the boundary between space and its representation." An international jury chose Parasite 2.0 as the winner due to its "project’s characteristics place it at the borders between architecture, set design, art and performance." In a statement, organizers said, "Its victory was decreed by its playful, welcoming composition, the inclusion in the project important aspects relating to tis communication and “social” interaction and lastly its ties with a museum, theatrical and cinematographic construction tradition deeply rooted in the history of Rome." Parasite 2.0, primarily a production and research lab, is comprised of Eugenio Cosentino, Stefano Colombo, and Luca Marullo. Together, their work stems from the dynamic of architectural production and urban life. The jury included Pippo Ciorra, Senior Curator MAXXI Architettura; Margherita Guccione, Director MAXXI Architettura; Hou Hanru, Artistic Director MAXXI; Monia Trombetta, Coordinator MAXXI Arte; Sean Anderson, Associate Curator of Art and Design MoMA; and Massimo Alvisi, Alvisi Kirimoto + Partners. The winner was chosen from a shortlist that also included Deltastudio (Ronciglione – VT), Angelo Renna (Prato), de gayardon bureau (Cesena), and demogo (Treviso).
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Goldstein, Hill & West Architects designs Long Island City’s tallest tower yet

Goldstein, Hill & West Architects (GHWA), in partnership with developer Chris Xu, just unleashed a 79-story residential tower on Long Island City, Queens. At 963 feet tall, the tower will be 305 feet taller than its neighbor, CitiGroup's 50-story One Court Square, already one of the tallest buildings in the neighborhood. The ground floor will sport 19,721 square feet of retail, while 774 apartments will be spread over 759,412 square feet of residential space. Xu bought the 79,000-square-foot site for $143 million from Citigroup in July 2015, YIMBY reports. This is not the New York–based firm's first high rise: GHWA is behind Long Island City's 42–12 28th Street, a 57-story residential tower, as well as 605 West 42nd Street, a glassy 60-story residential tower "detailed in a clean modernist idiom." Walking down Jackson Avenue, it's hard not to notice all the new high rises going up in the neighborhood. Walking down Jackson Avenue in the late afternoon, though, and it's hard not to be blinded by the sunlight that reflects from all those new buildings. The so-called Court Square City View Tower is a mere four blocks from MoMA PS1, and, although there's no word yet on when construction will begin, visitors to PS1 this summer will be thankful for the central feature of Escobedo Solíz Studio's Young Architects Program installation. The colorful rope canopy promises to shade visitors from skyscraper sunburns, giving a whole new meaning to Warm Up.
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Escobedo Solíz Studio wins 2016 MoMA/PS1 Young Architects Program

Mexico City–based Escobedo Solíz Studio is the winner of the 17th annual MoMA PS1 Young Architects Program (YAP) in Queens, New York. Escobedo Solíz Studio, beat five finalists to design a temporary urban landscape for the courtyard of the 2016 Warm Up summer music series. Weaving the Courtyard, will open at MoMA PS1 in Long Island City in early June. According to the architects, the installation will be “neither an object nor a sculpture standing in the courtyard, but a series of simple, powerful actions that generate new and different atmospheres.” The canopy departs from the last few object-based interventions, such as Wendy, Hy-Fi, and COSMO. A vibrant, colorful landscape will be created by using the formwork holes in the walls to anchor colored bands. Water will again be an experiential component, as a wading pool will allow visitors to cool off in fresh water. “This year’s finalists of the Young Architects Program explored a range of approaches, materials, and scales to effectively question the MoMA PS1 courtyard as an arena for escape. Escobedo Solíz’s ingenious proposal speaks to both the ephemerality of architectural imagery today but also to the nature of spatial transactions more broadly. From the evocative woven canopy that will engage visitors overhead to a reflective wading pool, Weaving the Courtyard sensitively brings together elements of MoMA PS1’s Warm Up Series with an exuberant collection of zones and environments,” said Sean Anderson, Associate Curator in MoMA’s Department of Architecture and Design, in a statement. Klaus Biesenbach, MoMA PS1 Director and MoMA Chief Curator at Large added, "This year marks the 40th anniversary of MoMA PS1 and the 17th joint annual competition brought together by the Architecture and Design Department at MoMA and MoMA PS1. The Mexico City-based team will work on a colorful, celebratory intervention that takes its point of departure to be the existing geometric concrete forms in the courtyard of MoMA PS1 simultaneously creating an urban beach of sand, water, and vibrant colors.” https://youtu.be/aH72lU4AGpU The other finalists for this year’s MoMA PS1 Young Architects Program were First Office (Andrew Atwood and Anna Neimark), Ultramoderne (Yasmin Vorbis and Aaron Forrest), COBALT OFFICE (Andrew Colopy and Robert Booth), and Frida Escobedo. An exhibition of the five finalists' proposed projects will be on view at MoMA over the summer, organized by Sean Anderson, Associate Curator, with Arièle Dionne-Krosnick, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Architecture and Design, MoMA.
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MoMA PS1 names five finalists for the 2016 Young Architects Program

MoMA has announced five finalists for the 2016 Young Architects Program. The winner will design and build an installation in MoMA PS1's courtyard during the summer Warm Up performance series. The honor is considered one of the most prestigious platforms for emerging architects in the United States and internationally. Notably, there are no New York architects on the lists this year. This is the program's seventeenth year. To choose the finalists, editors of architecture publications and deans of architecture schools nominate around twenty established architects working in a new style or with new methods, current students, and recent architecture school graduates. Practitioners and curators from the art and architecture worlds winnow the field down to five finalists. First Office / Andrew Atwood and Anna Neimark, Los Angeles ESCOBEDO + SOLIS / Lazbent Pavel Escobedo Amaral and Andres Soliz Paz, Mexico City ULTRAMODERNE / Yasmin Vobis and Aaron Forrest, Providence, Rhode Island COBALT OFFICE / Andrew Colopy and Robert Booth, Houston, Texas Frida Escobedo / Mexico City Last year, Madrid- and New York–based Andres Jacque Architects/Office for Political Innovation won the competition with COSMO, a living machine that makes the water filtration process visible. The whimsical installation commented on sustainability as well as architecture as the product of global networks. COSMO was sourced from generic parts in Spain, shipped to New York, and assembled onsite.
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AN Exclusive: Andres Jaque Explains Why This Year’s YAP Winner “COSMO” Is Being Built In Spain

Each year, the MoMA/PS1 Young Architect’s Program features an exciting design by an up-and-coming architect in the courtyard for the Warm-Up series. This year Madrid- and New York–based Andres Jaque and his Office for Political Innovation will build a huge, roving sprinkler system called COSMO that will surely liven up the event. However, it is different from years past: It will be built in Spain and shipped over by boat. Why? “Architecture is no longer about sign or form,” Jaque told AN. “It is about social networks, and how materials move through those networks. Architecture is nothing if it doesn’t engage these networks.” The design for COSMO is made from off-the-rack parts that are not altered in anyway as they are assembled on site. They remain as generic as possible so that they can be reused more easily. “We are designing them so that we don’t have to cut them. If we cut them we would be minimizing their reuse potential.” This could mean making something locally, or shipping it globally. It is a rethinking of what something means to be local. Much of COSMO could be made anywhere in the world. The parts are put together with wires, which are also reusable. The novel tectonics of COSMO are derived from the new, specific ways that the generic parts are put together. When the parts are allowed to have life after architecture, they take on 2nd and 3rd lives elsewhere. “It is a new way to relate to the land,” Jaque said, “It is an alternative to consumption. We want to give things more lives. It is a different culture of materiality that we want to bring to PS1.” Irrigations systems have been a recurring theme in Jaque’s work. He sees them as one of the original and most complete, open source knowledge systems. Since the 1940s, the collective intelligence of irrigation systems have been evolving so that anyone can use the technology. This radical way of thinking about objects and their networks is something the Spanish architect has researched extensively over his career, since growing up. “My family comes from Madrid but also from Aquitaine in France. Both parts of my family had their lives divided between cities and countryside. In France I remember spending summers looking and playing with the centered pivot irrigation systems that my uncle had in his farm,” said Jaque. “I also saw the way he transformed them and exchange parts of it with his neighbors. I guest it all started with that. It was part of a neighbors-based economy.” COSMO is not the first PS1 project to give afterlife to building materials. Past winners such as SO-IL, CODA, HWKN, and Interboro Partners have used ready-made parts that can be re-used after the summer, such as scaffolding, ping-pong tables, skateboard decks, and a host of other objects. “Billion Oyster Pavilion,” one of the 2015 Figment pavilions on Governor’s Island, is specifically designed to be thrown into the New York Harbor later this summer, where it will take on new life as an oyster habitat. According to Jaque, bringing in parts from all over the world is actually better for the environment. This new, global way of producing an architecture is actually more energy-efficient and causes less emissions, due to the sheer volume of freight that a boat can handle compared to a truck. So shipping tires from Turkey is better for the environment than bringing them from somewhere in the U.S., since New York has a harbor. The team also found irrigation pyramids in Spain, where they were more easily procured. The parts are expected to arrive in New York sometime in May, and should be ready for the June 27 opening Warm-Up.
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Video> Here are the nitty-gritty details how how MoMA PS1’s COSMO pavilion will filter water

The New York City and Madrid-based architecture firm Andres Jaque Architects/Office for Political Innovation has released a wonky video explaining its mobile, water purifying installation which recently won MoMA PS 1's Young Architects Program. The futuristic-looking structure, called COSMO, is comprised primarily of suspended hoses that will filter 3,000 gallons of water over the course of four days. Check out the video above to see how COSMO will work its magic. But before you do, just a quick heads up that there are some black-and-white photos of naked people hanging out on a beach at the top of the video. (Honestly, it's probably pretty SFW so don't worry.) [h/t The Dirt]
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Madrid’s Andres Jacque wins MoMA PS1 2015 Young Architects Program

MoMA and MoMA PS 1 have announced the winner of the 2015 Young Architects Program from a shortlist of five firms: Andres Jacque Architects/Office for Political Innovation. Based in Madrid and New York, Jacque's firm will build COSMO, a large structure made of irrigation tubes and planted zones, which will make the process of water filtration visible to PS 1 visitors. The structure will contain 3,000 gallons of water which will take four days to complete the cycle of purification through the structure. Seating and performance areas will be located underneath the suspended structure, which, when illuminated at night, will become a beacon in the neighborhood. The project is intended as a prototype, which could be recreated anywhere in the world to create fresh drinking water. "This year's proposal takes one of the Young Architects Program's essential requirements—providing a water feature for leisure and fun—and highlights water itself as a scarce resource," said Pedro Gadanho, a curator of architecture and design at MoMA, in a statement. "Relying on off-the-shelf components from agro-industrial origin, an exuberant mobile architecture celebrates water-purification processes and turns their intricate visualization into an unusual backdrop." COSMO will open in late June as a part of the annual Warm Up summer party series at MoMA PS 1. The Young Architects Program has become on the world's leading showcases for emerging architectural talent.
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Five finalist named for 2015 MoMA PS1 Young Architects Program

MoMA PS1 has announced the five finals for the 2015 Young Architects Program pavilion for the annual Warm Up performance series. The program is considered one of the most prestigious showcases for emerging architects in North America. This year's finalists hail from New York, Miami, Los Angeles, and Toronto. Andres Jaque / Office for Political Innovation of New York and Madrid, Spain. brillhart architecture from Miami. Erin Besler of Los Angeles. The Bittertang Farm of New York. Studio Benjamin Dillenburger from Toronto. The jury for the Young Architects Program included Glenn Lowry, Director, The Museum of Modern Art, Kathy Halbreich, Associate Director, The Museum of Modern Art, Peter Reed, Senior Deputy Director, Curatorial Affairs, The Museum of Modern Art, Barry Bergdoll, Curator, Department of Architecture and Design, The Museum of Modern Art, Pedro Gadanho, Curator, Department of Architecture and Design, The Museum of Modern Art, Klaus Biesenbach, Director, MoMA PS1 and Chief Curator at Large, The Museum of Modern Art, Peter Eleey, Curator, MoMA PS1 Pippo Ciorra, Senior Curator, MAXXI Architecturra, National Museum of XXI Century Arts (MAXXI), Rome, Jeannette Plaut, Director, YAP CONSTRUCTO, and Marcelo Sarovic, Director, YAP CONSTRUCTO
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Yeezus! What a Jury! The Living and The Dead at MoMA PS1’s Young Architects Program

The MoMA PS 1 jury process that selected the “100 percent organic pavilion Hy-Fi” for its 2014 pavilion may have been a contentious group. The museum announced last month that David Benjamin, the principal of Brooklyn-based firm The Living, would design the temporary structure. But several sources have told Eavesdrop that one of the short listed firms (Collective-LOK, PARA-Project, WOJR, over,under, Fake Industries Architectural Agonism, LAMAS, Pita + Bloom) was in fact told that it—not Benjamin—had won the design competition. The architects were told to come to a PS 1 meeting to discuss moving forward as the winner, but after waiting for an hour they were told that a member of the jury was not there and the meeting could not take place. They waited patiently for another hour until they were asked to go home and wait—“don’t call us, we’ll call you.” Later that week, a MoMA official contacted the firm and told them that, actually, Benjamin and his firm had been selected as the winner of the coveted summer pavilion—oops, sorry. It was, of course, a devastating blow. So devastating that the architects are not willing to talk about the episode. So MoMA will go forward with the “organic” brick pavilion. Benjamin employer Columbia University reported in its May 15 GSAPP newsletter that “Kanye West and GSAPP faculty member David Benjamin (M.Arch ‘05) are working on a ‘strictly confidential’ project.” Though other sources claim that this project involves a “new type of movie theater and 3D entertainment experience,” can we expect Benjamin’s partner to take part in PS 1’s usually rollicking summer party to inaugurate the pavilion?

Video> CODA’s “Party Wall” To Open in June

Caroline O'Donnell's Ithaca-based studio, CODA, is preparing to build a towering pavilion in the courtyard of MoMA PS1 in Queens out of scrap from the manufacture of skateboards. O'Donnell talked to AN when the pavilion, called Party Wall, was unveiled in January, saying, "There are eight different kinds of skateboard forms, and each board has its own errors, which produce surprising effects." CODA has now released a stunning video rendering showing Party Wall peeking over the walls of the PS1 courtyard adjacent to landmarks like the graffiti-covered Five Pointz building across the street. It suggests how the crowds that flock to MoMA PS1 each summer might interact with the structure showing benches also made from scrap wood. (Plus, an easter egg: check out what the pavilion's shadow spells at the 1:40 mark!) Party Wall will open in late June and we'll be sure to see you there! All renderings courtesy MoMA PS1. Click on a thumbnail to launch the slideshow.