Posts tagged with "Yabu Pushelberg":

Six quick picks from BDNY 2017

The Boutique Design Trade Fair (BNDY) is the hospitality show, bringing together the industry's interior designers, architects, developers, and experts to see the latest furnishings, lighting, fabrics, wall coverings, flooring, carpeting, bath and spa, and accessories.   We spent one day going to and fro between 600 booths and presentations. Check out a few of our favorites below. Hayon x Nani collection Jaime Hayón for Nanimarquina Spanish designer Jaime Hayón designed a collection of rugs based on hand-drawn sketches for Nanimarquina’s 30th Anniversary. The Paul Klee–like rugs feature curious motifs and figures, including animal heads, abstract shapes, and fluid line work. Grid Collection Warp & Weft for Yabu Pushelberg The first four rugs from a new collaboration between Yabu Pushelberg and Warp & Weft were revealed during BDNY (the remaining eight designs will be released throughout 2018). Inspired by the right angles and geometry of urban topography, principals George Yabu and Glenn Pushelberg softened and simplified the visual narrative of rigid city streets by deconstructing grid-like patterns and transforming them into one-dimensional planes. Spanish industrial design masterminds Miguel Milá and his son Gonzalo Milà created a a sleek rattan outdoor seating collection, available in natural wood and black. Olivio Armchair iSiMAR This expressive armchair is fashioned from polyester powder-coated galvanized steel, and is offered in 24 colors and 5 metal finishes. Cestita Batería Santa & Cole A new wireless adaption of a light fixture originally designed in 1962 by  Spanish designer Miguel Milá is now available as a small rechargeable, portable table lamp. Cestita is encased in a bent wooden structure with a top handle that envelops an opal-shaped orb. Koord El Torrent Designed as a part of the portable division of the collection, these battery-powered luminaires filter light through a woven rope shade creating a venetian blind lighting effect; available in four sizes, a variety of colors, and suitable for outdoor or indoor use.  

New hotel towers revealed for L.A.’s booming South Park neighborhood

San Francisco–based Gensler and New York and Toronto-based Yabu Pushelberg have released renderings for the Fig + Pico development, the latest set of towers for Los Angeles’s rapidly transforming South Park neighborhood. New York-based real estate firm Lightstone Group is working on the latest scheme for the city’s entertainment district, which encompass a grouping of towers on a 1.22-acre site directly across from the Los Angeles Convention Center and rising on the same block as the Harley Ellis Devereaux-designed Circa project, which is made up of a pair of elliptical, 38-story residential towers containing 648 units. Urbanize.LA reports that according to an initial study released by the Department of City Planning, the Fig + Pico project would encompass trio of mixed-use hotel projects, with two of those hotels co-located within a 42-story tower containing a combined 820 rooms. The third hotel will be located in a 25-story tower adjacent to the tallest mass and will contain 342 rooms. Preliminary renderings contained within that report show a cluster of rectilinear, glass-clad monoliths sprouting from a mid-rise podium structure. All three towers are supported by slender, super-tall columns and are alternately oriented toward the south and west. The podium structure for the two taller masses has been designed to contain 11,000 square feet of ground floor retail spaces, as well as rooftop pool decks, conference areas, and a 353-stall parking structure while the third tower will contain 2,100 square feet of retail space among other programs. The project represents the latest addition to the city’s projected skyline, which according to proposed and currently-under-construction projects, will be steadily marching southward from the new AC Martin-designed Wilshire Grand tower toward Interstate 10 over the next few years. Just last week, Skidmore Owings & Merrill and P-A-T-T-E-R-N-S revealed designs for a crop of residential high-rise towers. Like many of the adjacent residential and hotel projects, Fig + Pico is expected to have, per the developer’s request, illuminated signage along the retail podium levels for advertising and possibly, digital public art installations, as well. Pending city approval, the project is due to break ground in late 2017 or early 2018 and will be completed by 2022.

Yabu Pushelberg designs a super-Canadian interior for the Canada Olympic House in Rio

Certain things come to mind when conjuring images of Canada: maple leaves and syrup, poutine, Drake running through "The Six," and Mounties—to name a few. Upon first viewing photos of the Toronto-based Yabu Pushelberg's design for the Canada Olympic House (COH)‚ it's apparent what country the house belongs to (without being too kitschy). The mostly red and white structure features sculptural installations and furniture by Canadian artists and designers. "Our aim is to show the world that Canadian design is progressive and sophisticated. The design for Canada Olympic House is bold, smart, fresh and unexpected," remarked Yabu Pushelberg cofounder George Yabu. Cofounder Glenn Pushelberg also said "The Canada Olympic House design is conceptually powerful and aims to represent all things Canadian with respect to excellence." In an impressive feat, the entire project (assembly and installation) had to be completed in less than two weeks, and will have to be broken down in the same amount of time. The quick turnaround inspired much of the design, which uses simple, low cost materials. The entry features a bold, red 8-foot-high hoarding printed with white lettering that welcomes visitors and leads to a lobby that features a bright white vinyl floor printed with Canadian Olympic Team graphics. In the spiral stairway leading to the second floor is a mobile made of suspended red and white canoe paddles designed by Toronto-based artisans Moss & Lam Art Studios that guides visitors up to the celebration lounge. The lounge is furnished with modular furniture from the Canadian Tire Canvas Collection, which is interspersed with custom made tables by Saint-Damase Furniture. A deconstructed Canadian flag made of  strips of painted canvas, also by Moss & Lam Art Studios, is suspended from the ceiling. The Petro Canada Pantry is stocked with snacks and illuminated by three glowing canoes—custom made by a Canadian artist—alongside vintage photos of Canadian Olympic athletes. In the backyard terrace red and white ombre Muskoka chairs evoke a "quintessential" Canadian yard. Finally, the team store is inspired by a modern log cabin and features goods from Hudson's Bay, which also provided textiles for the project, as well as plenty of #TeamCanada merch.

Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Bronze The Waldorf Astoria Beijing

Bronze facade is inspired by Chinese historic architecture.

In designing the facade of the new Waldorf Astoria Beijing, Chicago-based Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture (AS+GG) set out to create a contemporary expression that maintained a relationship to the city’s historic context. The project, after all, is within walking distance of the Forbidden City and many of the Chinese capitol’s famous Hutongs. “How do we make the experience of going to a hotel special and what about it would be Chinese?” enquired founding partner Gordon Gill. “From an experience standpoint, what about the wall could change your experience in your room?” The answer was a bronze facade with a bay window system that protrudes out from the face of the building.
  • Facade Manufacturer Yuanda Exterior Wall Manufacturer
  • Architects Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture
  • Facade Installer Yuanda Exterior Wall Manufacturer
  • Facade Consultant Lerch Bates
  • Location Beijing, China
  • Date of Completion 2014
  • System bronze panels with modular bay windows and solar shading
  • Products bronze, low-iron glass
The bay windows are not uniform, however, but tuned to differing angles and orientations to frame particular views. This makes the whole building “like a compound eye,” according to Gill. Working in co-ordination with Toronto-based Yabu Pushelberg, the interior architects, the team developed a modular system based on the size of the rooms and the dimensions of the structural bays. It led to a cleaner design that was easier to construct. While the texture created by the bay window system is ornamental and connected to the context, it also provides solar shading. Shade provided by horizontal glass fins above the recessed vertical windows allowed the architects to use very clear low-iron glass to give the best views possible. “It is not tainted by a tint or a color in any way. There is a low-e coating on the glass, but it’s a low-level so it’s not reflective on the inside,” said Gill. The architects developed the bronze details, and the client initially liked it. The designers were excited, but nervous about it actually happening. Gill explained, “We went back to the chairman a few weeks later for the presentation, and he came back and said ‘Well I want you to know that I had lunch with the mayor and I told him that this building was going to be bronze, and he loved it, so now we have to do it.’ So it was just a matter of detailing out.” Metal panels can present technical challenges, especially catalytic failure between the z-clips and the metal panels, including rusting, corrosion, or telegraphing through the panel. The design team mitigated these problems, so the main challenge was to get the color right. Bronze is not a typical material, so they had to rely on their own blend of copper, nickel, and brass to achieve a warm, golden color that was not too yellow, red, or brown, but somewhere in between. There is variation from panel to panel—an unpredictability that adds to the texture and richness of the facade. The unusual material was inspired by two large bronze pots at a nearby historic hospital building, which the client had referenced. This decision exemplifies the ethos of the building, which was to capture the elegance and quality of Waldorf Astoria’s brand in contemporary yet contextually sensitive building. It has come to serve as an example to luxury hoteliers around the world.