Posts tagged with "WUHO":

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On View> Gregory Ain: Low-Cost Modern Housing and The Construction of a Social Landscape

Gregory Ain: Low-Cost Modern Housing and The Construction of a Social Landscape WUHO Gallery 6518 Hollywood Boulevard, Los Angeles Through April 26 Gregory Ain was a pioneer in the development of low-cost modern housing, and many of his efforts fused radical, left-wing politics and cooperative living with architecture. And a new exhibit in Los Angeles spotlights five of the architect’s most innovative housing projects. Projects included in the exhibit at Woodbury University's WUHO Gallery in Hollywood are Dunsmuir Flats, Park Planned Homes, Avenel Cooperative Housing, Mar Vista Housing, and Community Homes Cooperative. The show consists of classic black and white photographs by Julius Shulman and contemporary color shots by Korean artist Kyungsub Shin. Shin’s photos—first commissioned for the 2011 Gwangju Design Biennale in South Korea—document how Ain’s small-yet-well-resolved houses—clustered to lower costs, share resources, and create social connections—can still accommodate contemporary lifestyles. "People are highly attracted to these houses today,” said show curator Anthony Fontenot. "There's something very comfortable about them, but they're still strikingly modern." The show also includes original materials, such as Ain’s “manifesto” of the planned community, fleshed out with drawings, documents, letters, and other archival materials. "We could learn a lot from looking at his ideas," said Fontenot. "Our own ecological, economic, and political climate demands that you cannot exist on your own."
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Sir Peter Cook Provides Worthy “Audience” At Woodbury Thesis Exhibition

Earlier this month AN West Coast Editor Sam Lubell joined Sir Peter Cook and Woodbury University students and faculty at WUHO Gallery in Hollywood for Drawing Room: An Audience with Sir Peter Cook, an exhibition of thesis and degree projects and an informal discussion. Drawing Room_Super::Architects Cook, outspoken as always, lauded Woodbury's experimental, outsider nature, the ability of drawing to "elevate the conversation through the unknown," and "nutters" everywhere. His inspiration was omnipresent, with exceptionally-drawn (or drawn and combined with computer rendering), technologically-driven projects—rethinking housing, science facilities, humanitarian architecture, and so on— that paid homage to his quirky aesthetic. The exhibition was curated by Woodbury professors Peter Culley and Berenika Boberska.
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Just Wrapped: Long Pictures, Copious Pools and Punk Installations

Occasionally we can't cover an exhibition until it's too late. But we want to share some excellent shows that recently closed in Los Angeles: Heather Flood's Punk'd at SCI-Arc Gallery and  WUHO Gallery's Linear City and The Big Atlas of L.A. Pools. For Punk'd, Flood and her team arranged strips of interlocking, twisting aluminum into spiky configurations to demonstrate how two-dimensional graphics could be translated into three dimensional construction, as if the gradient grid of colors were textiles. Its bright red and white color palette was taken from the British Royal Family's Balmoral tartan, a slightly subversive Punk Movement shout out. "I wanted the graphic pattern to emerge out of the logic of construction, explained Flood, who wanted to move away from the common use of graphics as appliqué. In Linear City, photographer Lane Barden captured three of LA's most iconic linear stretches — the Los Angeles River, Wilshire Boulevard, and the Alameda Corridor Railroad Trench--in their entirety in a sprawling visual progression along one of the long gallery's walls. The immensity of these infrastructural projects came to life, revealing the sprawling scope of the city's midcentury engineering ambitions. Details like LA River's wildlife, and Wilshire Boulevard's stunning tectonic and programmatic diversity changed perceptions of viewers used to seeing these urban staples from a much more static and singular perspective. On the other wall in The Big Atlas designer Benedikt Groß and cartographer Joseph K. Lee mapped every neighborhood in Los Angeles through methods such as crowdsourcing, outsourcing, and geo-mapping to chart 43,123 swimming pools. Their effort—presented in volume after volume of booklets laid out on a long table—didn't just illuminate for the first time where all the city's swimming was taking place, but it explored alternative methods of harvesting very specific (and incredibly voluminous) data in the city.
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Kickstarter> Support Deborah Sussman Loves Los Angeles

Another day, another Kickstarter campaign. On the heels of several successful museum and gallery exhibition campaigns, Woodbury University Hollywood Gallery (WUHO) has decided to start a campaign for an upcoming exhibition celebrating the groundbreaking visual communication work of Los Angeles–based designer Deborah Sussman. Entitled Deborah Sussman Loves Los Angeles!, the exhibition, which is set to open in December, will be the first retrospective of her early environmental graphic design work, honing in on projects from her days at the Eames Office up to the 1984 Olympics. Sussman, whose work has been at the interface of graphic design and the built environment for more than 60 years, helped create striking visual imagery for Seattle’s Opera House, Disney World in Orlando and the 1984 Olympic Games in Los Angeles, to name just a few early projects. The exhibition, which is curated and organized by Catherine Gudis, Barbara Bestor, Thomas Kracauer, and Shannon Starkey, will include the gallery exhibit, a panel discussion and a poster publication featuring around 50 unique objects and images that represent Sussman’s early- to mid-career work.
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Big Architecture Weekend in Los Angeles

Every once in a while forces converge and we get an epic architecture weekend. One of those weekends is happening now. Here are some of the events going on in LA this weekend: 1.) Hollywood Wilshire Boulevard Focus Weekend, featuring free admission at the A+D Museum, Hammer Museum, Craft and Folk Art Museum, MAK Center, Fowler Museum along Wilshire Boulevard as well as events at all the institutions. All revolve around the Getty's epic Pacific Standard Time series of exhibitions. These include: A discussion called The Legacy of the California Design Exhibitions at LACMA; a talk with Deborah Sussman about Eames Designs at A+D; a panel about Mapping Another L.A.: The Chicano Art Movement at the Fowler, a discussion about Now Dig This! Art and Black Los Angeles 1960 – 1980 at the Hammer; and a  about Sympathetic Seeing: Esther McCoy and the Heart of American Modernist Architecture and Design at the MAK Center. 2.) Launch of the exhibition, Architecture—A Woman's Profession at WUHO Hollywood and a Saturday panel discussion at the MAK Center, moderated by AN's Sam Lubell and featuring author Tanja Kullack as well as Barbara Bestor, Monica Ponce de Leon, Dagmar Richter, and Ingalill Whlroos-Ritter. 3.) Inglewood Open Studios, featuring visits to the studios of more than 30 artists (and a few architects) in this emerging arts district, but showing off great arts spaces like the 32,400 square foot Beacon Arts Building.