Posts tagged with "Woodbury":

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AN’s 2016 Facades+ conference series kicks off in Los Angeles

“We don’t need walls anymore.  We need living, breathing systems that provide so much more to the urban realm than keeping in conditioned air and keeping out noise and pollutants.” - Will Wright, AIA|LA

Los Angeles’ 2016 Facades+ Conference, presented by The Architect’s Newspaper, is the 18th event in an ongoing series of conferences and forums that have unfolded in cities across the nation, including New York City, Miami, San Francisco, Dallas, Houston, Seattle, D.C., and Chicago. Held at the L.A. Hotel Downtown, the conference incorporated architects, engineers, fabricators, and innovative material manufacturers into a multidisciplinary two-day event covering the state of building envelope design thinking today. The daylong symposium kicked off with spirited remarks by Will Wright, Director of Government & Public Affairs at AIA L.A., where he set forth a plea for stronger emphasis on localism and craftsmanship. Co-chaired by Kevin Kavanagh and Alex Korter of CO Architects, the event included AIA LA, four local architecture schools – UCLA, USC, Woodbury, and Cal Poly Pomona – and a robust collection of Los Angeles-based architecture firms. Four panel discussions throughout the day covered the influence of building envelopes on business, education, structural design, and data analysis. The conversations engaged audience participation through an interactive, web-based tool called Sli.do. In a morning panel discussion titled “Money Well Spent? An Owner’s Perspective on the Value of Facades,” moderator Kevin Kavanagh spoke with representatives from Kaiser Permanente, Kitchell, and The Ratkovich Company on finding the right balance between aesthetics, energy performance, fiscal responsibility, and efficient project scheduling. During breaks, conference attendees attended a “Methods+Materials” gallery that highlighted innovative building envelope materials such as electrochromic glass, metal mesh fabric with integrated media display, and ultra-compact surfacing products. The symposium was highlighted by keynote addresses from Enrique Norten and Eric Owen Moss.
  • Presented by The Architect's Newspaper
  • 2016 Conference Chair YKK AP America
  • Gold Sponsors GKD Metal Fabrics View Dynamic Glass
  • Methods+Materials Gallery 3M, Agnora, Akzo Nobel, Boston Valley Terra Cotta, Cambridge Architectural, CE|Strong, Consolidated Glass Holdings, Cosentino, CRL-U.S. Aluminum, Elward, Giroux Glass, Glasswerks, Guardian, Kawneer, Nichiha, Ollin Stone, POHL Group, Porcelanosa, PPG IdeaScapes, Prodema, Rigidized Metals, Roxul, Sapa, Schüco, Sedak, Sika, STI, Terracore, Tremco, UL, UltraGlas, Vitrocsa, and Walter P Moore
Norten’s opening keynote set forth an argument for a socially responsible architecture integrated into the city via infrastructural, landscape, and public space projects. He cited works of his firm, TEN Arquitectos, which incorporate topographical manipulations of the landscape to establish social spaces of public engagement. His work intentionally camouflages the building envelope into a contextual landscape—be it an adjacent park or cityscape—to dissolve the separation between public and private. Eric Owen Moss spoke in the afternoon, questioning at what point the conceptual content of a project becomes lost amidst constructional realities. Through recent work of his firm, Eric Owen Moss Architects, he focused on building envelope details that strayed from original design intent, transforming in concept and tectonics as engineers, fabricators, and contractors participated in the process. In a panel discussion titled “Bytes, Dollars, EUI: Data Streams and Envelopes,” Moderator William Menking, Founder and Editor-in-Chief of The Architect’s Newspaper, spoke with Atelier 10, Gehry Technologies, and CPG regarding tools and processes facilitating facade analysis and optimization. Sameer Kashyap (Gehry Technologies) shared perhaps the most bewildering stat of the day—that GT was able to script processes which allowed two people to produce over 1200 shop drawings per day for 33 weeks in the coordination of a highly complex facade system. Paul Zajfen of CO Architects rounded out the day with a presentation titled “Facades: A Manifestation of Client, Culture, Climate,” where he argued for contextually specific design producing a facade that “would not be possible at any other time—and in no other place.” The symposium was followed on day two with a series of “dialog” and “lab” workshops covering net-zero facade systems, digital fabrication processes, curtain wall design, and advanced facade analysis. A full roster of organizers and sponsors can be found on the conference website. The Los Angeles event was the first in 2016 of a seven-city lineup, and will be followed by a Facades+AM morning forum in Washington, D.C., on March 10th. The next two-day conference will take place in New York City April 21st and 22nd.
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Sir Peter Cook Provides Worthy “Audience” At Woodbury Thesis Exhibition

Earlier this month AN West Coast Editor Sam Lubell joined Sir Peter Cook and Woodbury University students and faculty at WUHO Gallery in Hollywood for Drawing Room: An Audience with Sir Peter Cook, an exhibition of thesis and degree projects and an informal discussion. Drawing Room_Super::Architects Cook, outspoken as always, lauded Woodbury's experimental, outsider nature, the ability of drawing to "elevate the conversation through the unknown," and "nutters" everywhere. His inspiration was omnipresent, with exceptionally-drawn (or drawn and combined with computer rendering), technologically-driven projects—rethinking housing, science facilities, humanitarian architecture, and so on— that paid homage to his quirky aesthetic. The exhibition was curated by Woodbury professors Peter Culley and Berenika Boberska.
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Kickstarter> Support Deborah Sussman Loves Los Angeles

Another day, another Kickstarter campaign. On the heels of several successful museum and gallery exhibition campaigns, Woodbury University Hollywood Gallery (WUHO) has decided to start a campaign for an upcoming exhibition celebrating the groundbreaking visual communication work of Los Angeles–based designer Deborah Sussman. Entitled Deborah Sussman Loves Los Angeles!, the exhibition, which is set to open in December, will be the first retrospective of her early environmental graphic design work, honing in on projects from her days at the Eames Office up to the 1984 Olympics. Sussman, whose work has been at the interface of graphic design and the built environment for more than 60 years, helped create striking visual imagery for Seattle’s Opera House, Disney World in Orlando and the 1984 Olympic Games in Los Angeles, to name just a few early projects. The exhibition, which is curated and organized by Catherine Gudis, Barbara Bestor, Thomas Kracauer, and Shannon Starkey, will include the gallery exhibit, a panel discussion and a poster publication featuring around 50 unique objects and images that represent Sussman’s early- to mid-career work.
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Brace for the Shulman Extravaganza

This weekend marks what would have been the 100th birthday of legendary LA photographer Julius Shulman, on 10/10/10. To commemorate the event there are no less than three major events happening around the city (and probably more that we don't know of). This includes a symposium celebrating his legacy at Woodbury University this Saturday, a MAK Center tour of the famous houses he photographed this Sunday, and a show of his early, personal work put on by his gallerist, Craig Krull, opening on October 16. Get ready to celebrate our favorite cranky shutterbug, who happens to be the best architectural photographer LA has ever seen.
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Moving Past Dingbats

The LA Forum for Architecture and Urban Design just announced the winners of its Dingbat 2.0 competition, developing new designs to replace one of the most prevalent types of post-war LA apartment blocks. An exhibition of the winners went on display last Thursday, and will run through July 24 at LA Forum Events @ Woodbury Hollywood, 6518 Hollywood Boulevard. The winning professional scheme was "Microparcelization," by the team of Carmen C. Cham, James Black, and Tyler Gross. The scheme replaces multi-family Dingbats with a new neighborhood made up of diverse, very small single family lots. The winning student team, from the Universidad Nacional del litoral in Argentina, transformed service streets into green spaces and deconstructed Dingbat boxes into diverse and original array of compositions. Incidentally, the third student prize went to Columbia University's Ryan Lovett. We couldn't help but notice that his entry, Substantiating Surface, looked exactly like his entry for the AN/SCI-ARC New Infrastructure competition last year (see bottom two pix after the jump). Hmm.. The idea—self sustaining communities within a tight urban grid—is strikingly similar as well. That's not good..