Posts tagged with "Wolf-Gordon":

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Meet the winners of our 2017 Best of Products Awards!

After hours of carefully deliberating over hundreds of entries for our largest-ever Products Awards, we are excited to share the winning designs. The 15 diverse categories included everything from hardware and furniture to facades, HVAC, and technology. Our amazing team of judges evaluated entries for innovation, aesthetics, performance, and value, selecting one winner and two honorable mentions for each category (we couldn’t choose just one!). Stay tuned next week to meet our honorable mentions. Both winners and honorable mentions are featured in our September issue—out September 6!
The Best of Products Awards Jury:
James Biber Partner, Biber Architects Olivia Martin Managing Editor, The Architect’s Newspaper William Menking Editor in Chief, The Architect’s Newspaper Patrick Parrish Owner, Patrick Parrish Gallery Tucker Viemeister Founder, Viemeister Industries Pilar Viladas Design writer and editor

THE WINNERS

 
Textiles INFINITE NEUTRAL Wolf-Gordon
Interior Residential Furniture
MUSHROOM TABLE
Outdoor Residential
SKYE
Outdoor Public
HVAC
WHISPERRECESSED LED
Facades
CORSO
Smart Home Systems AIO WALL MIRROR Robern
Structural
PROSEAL LE Icynene
Interior Commercial Furniture 
BUZZIFLOAT Alain Gilles for BuzziSpace
Kitchen
HOUSEHOLD RECYCLING COMPACTOR Krushr
Technology & Innovation 
MAKERARM Makerarm
Openings PORTAPIVOT 6530 XL Portapivot
Finishes & Surfaces ULTRA SPEC® SCUFF-X Benjamin Moore
Lighting
INFRA-STRUCTURE FLOS
Bath FONTANE BIANCHE Salvatori + Fantini
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Semi-Permanent Ink: Artist Charlotte Mann collaborates with Wolf Gordon on art installation in Brooklyn

Wolf Gordon's impressive Wink surface can turn any wall into a dry erase board. The design possibilities are endless considering Wink is completely translucent and can be applied to any color paint, wood, metal, or patterned wall covering without changing the original look. U.K.–based artist Charlotte Mann created a site-specific, large-scale installation at the Gowanus Souvenir Shop using the product that is on view until March 13. The 1:1 scale drawing is different from her typical pieces, which are much more permanent. Mann said that, "Using dry erase as a medium actually made things easier because I could change my mind, and allowed me to improvise." A portion of the installation has been photographed and reproduced as a limited-edition digital wall covering that is for sale at Gowanus Souvenir Shop, 543 Union Street, in Brooklyn. View a time-lapse video of the project below:
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Product> Facing the Wall: 6 Wild Wallcoverings

Wallcoverings have come a long way since the days of fuzzy, flocked papers in garish colors. Today, the erstwhile decorative product offers added value in the form of LEED credits, antimicrobial coatings, and even light-transmitting properties. Read on to see what's on our radar. Featherlight Flavor Paper Designed by Karen Hsu of Omnivore and Keryn Dizon, this pattern has a 27 ½-inch repeat; 27-inch-wide rolls are 15 feet long. The delicate photographic image comes in four standard colorways, with custom colors available; on clay-coat paper or silver mylar. Trace Trove Trace/Trove This tranquil scene—a silhouetted forest landscape, reflected in still “waters”—seems equal part photographic and hand-painted. The repeat width is 67 inches; the vertical repeat is 144 inches. In five colorways. Overlay/Underlay Wolf-Gordon Designed by Kevin Walz, this collection of wallcoverings was developed by scanning the reverse side of a swatch of painted linen and then overlapping that image with a scan of the front of the canvas. Printed with translucent inks, the patterns recall silkscreens or block prints. Henrik Large Designtex This striking, Scandinavian-inspired pattern is a kaleidoscope of bright, bold hues, and uses saturated color and crisp lines to create a sophisticated, contemporary, and playful design. Printed on a DNA substrate, this wallcovering’s strong vertical and diagonal lines produce a dynamic pattern, while from a distance the crisp edges blend into an overall design that recalls an ikat weave. ColourTec Glow Architects Paper Available in March 2015, this paper is a paintable, phosphorescent wallcovering. Activated by either natural or artificial light, the paper can be used for decorative or way-finding applications, such as signaling emergency egress routes. Spyro Carnegie Part of the Xorel Final Touch Collection, Spyro features an embroidered pattern that conjures a modern, geometric lace. Despite its delicate appearance, it is water-based solvent and bleach cleanable. PVC-free and Cradle-to-Cradle Silver certified, it is available in five colorways.
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Product> Surfaces Effective: 14 Innovative Materials

Visual grace notes to architectural compositions, surface and finish materials can bring tactility, color, and pattern into a space. From floor to ceiling, from wood and tile to composites and carpeting, here's our pick of the current palette. Plank Floors Dinesen Founded in 1898, this family-run company sources Douglas fir and oak from the best forests in Europe, selecting trees between eighty and 200 years old for exceptional custom flooring installations. Route 66 Viridian Reclaimed Wood These reclaimed red oak and white oak planks and panels get their rustic character from their original use as decking on tractor-trailers. In a variety of lengths and sizes. Waldilla Offered in five wood species—oak, fumed oak, sycamore maple, American cherry, and birch—these free-form flooring planks are anything but straight and narrow. Linear Line Collection Smith & Fong These carved interior panels are LEED-eligible, as the 4-foot by eight-foot, 3/4 inch sheets are made of 100% FSC-certified bamboo. Aura Dekton These fifty-six-inch by 125-inch ceramic slabs can be bookmatched for exterior or interior applications. Available in three thicknesses: 0.8cm, 1.2cm, and 2.0cm. Deep Nocturne DuPont Corian A classic jet black, the solid surfacing can be used in residential, office, and hospitality projects. The material can be thermoformed or worked using conventional wood-shop techniques. Fossil DTS Offered in five patterns, these 24-inch by 24-inch floor-rated porcelain tiles are available in beige, brown, and grey. Designed by Kasia Zareba. Star Land Porcelanico Frost-resistant, this porcelain tile is thermoformed to achieve a three-dimensional surface. In 60cm by 60cm format. Tierras Artisanal Mutina Made of extruded natural terra cotta, this collection comprises five three-dimensional tiles. Designed by Patricia Urquiola. Luminous Carpets Durable, light-transmissive carpeting from Desso combined with super-thin, programmable LED units from Philips turns the floor into a canvas for communication or decoration. Launching in America in April 2015. Cell Lama Made of industrial wool felt, this carpet is pressed—rather than woven or loomed—into random patterns. The material is non-flammable, soundproof, and water-resistant. HEM Collection Carpet Concept This collection of woven carpet is based on non-directional patterns of colored dots. In thirty-four colorways. Designed by Ben van Berkel/UNStudio. Tatami Nanimarquina Soft New Zealand wool is loomed with crisp jute to create a unique textured floorcovering. Designed by Ariadna Miquel and Nani Marquina. Henrik Large Designtex A wallcovering on DNA substrate, the strong lines and colors produce a dynamic pattern; from a distance, the crisp edges blend into an overall design that recalls an Ikat weave. Tall Wolf-Gordon Bending lines weave foreground and background together to create the illusion of height. In seven colorways. Designed by Morgan Bajardi.
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Product> Grethe Sørensen for Wolf-Gordon Textiles and Wallcoverings

This March, Wolf-Gordon will launch a collection of upholstery and wallcoverings featuring the designs of Danish textile designer Grethe Sørensen. The offerings highlight the artist’s ground-breaking technique of translating pixels to threads, most recently displayed in her exhibition Rush Hour/Shanghai 5 at Fuori Salone in Milan. Sørensen’s work often features variations of light and color found in night settings and urban landscapes, which she manipulates in Photoshop before translating on to fabric. Cooper-Hewitt plans to acquire her work once its new building opens in late 2014. Sørensen's line for Wolf-Gordon was created by taking unfocused photographs of urban lights which she then manipulated in photoshop. “It’s more about the colors and the shapes,” she told AN. The collection is Sørensen’s introduction to the U.S. market and is being produced at a Wolf-Gordon partner-mill in North Carolina. Despite it’s name, Millions of Colors is composed of just six weft colors—red, yellow, green, blue, cyan, and magenta—but endless arrangements support broad variations within three colorways. Black and white is also available.  All color options are composed of 94 percent worsted wool and 6 percent nylon. Three patterns were designed for wallcoverings. Soft Spots and Blinds are both digitally developed for vinyl. Codes is a pixelated pattern, available in half a dozen neutral colors. Wolf-Gordon will make HPDs available for Sørensen’s new collection as the company moves toward greater transparency with all its product offerings.
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NeoCon Taken by “Force”

Fabrikator

Wolf-Gordon’s “Force of Nature” spirals through Chicago’s Merchandise Mart during NeoCon 2013.

Based on the success of Wolf-Gordon’s inaugural NeoCon installation in 2012, chief creative officer Marybeth Shaw commissioned yet another show-stopping design piece for 2013. With the working title “Forces of Nature,” she turned once again to New York City–based design studio karlssonwilker and Brooklyn-based design-build collaborative The Guild to create a sculpture that would showcase the breadth of the company’s textiles and wall coverings. “The title ended up being quite appropriate to the final form, as the sculpture is a geometric construct with all of the resulting physical forces that might spin it out of the Mart’s ‘town square,’” Shaw recently told AN. Karlssonwilker initially conceived of a kinetic sculpture, but Shaw wanted a large installation—nearly 30 feet long and 14 feet wide. At that size, there was no room for movement within the given space, a double-height ceiling over an escalator that would carry 42,000 show attendees. “We wanted it to rotate like a rotisserie chicken, but we went for a larger form,” said Graham Kelman, creative manager for The Guild. Ultimately, the team decided on a static sculpture resembling a twisted spine that gives a sense of movement through color and form. “I lost sleep over whether it would fit because if there was flex in the spine, it wouldn’t work.”
  • Fabricators The Guild
  • Designers karlssonwilker, Marybeth Shaw, The Guild
  • Location Chicago
  • Date of Completion June 2013
  • Material wallcovering, textiles, Masonite, foam, aluminum, plywood, paint, screws
  • Process 3DS Max, SketchUp, CNC milling
The designers worked in SketchUp and 3DS Max to develop layered parameters for 68 slats—the vertebrae along the spine—that would showcase 136 of Wolf-Gordon’s products, one on each side. As visitors ascend the escalator, the slats appear above them like a twisting array of fanned-out cards. The products were arranged by color, forming a gradient that goes from white to orange to red on the way up the escalator and purple to brown on the way down. The edge of each slat slopes one degree, adding to the sculpture’s twisting vortex appearance. Since the sculpture hangs above show goers, realizing the piece with light materials was paramount. The slats are made from foam sandwiched between two sheets of Masonite. An aluminum channel along the perimeter of each slat provides rigidity. A plywood box connects and spaces each slat. The team used the software’s parametric capabilities to calculate where to place screw holes in the boxes and slats to create the twisting geometry. The Guild fabricated the 68 slats and plywood boxes in Brooklyn with a CNC mill, flat-packed for transport to Chicago, and installed at the Mart over a period of three days. “In terms of installation, it went well but it was a strange structure with torsional forces acting on it,” Kelman said. “As we built, the twist revealed itself.” Aircraft cable was fastened strategically along the spine, which was ultimately affixed to a 32-foot-long box trough, securely attached to beams of the ceiling. The final result was another eye-catching surprise during NeoCon at the Merchandise Mart. “Lots of things can go wrong with these projects,” said Shaw. “But if you’re on the same page and trust your collaborator’s intentions, you’ll always find your way to a solution.”
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FabriKator: Wolf-Gordon’s Escalator Canopy

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Guild_Wolf-Gordon

How a boutique Brooklyn design-build collective strung up NeoCon's first major installation.

Attendees of NeoCon in Chicago’s Merchandise Mart rode the escalators and ascended towards Wolf-Gordon's large crystalline canopy hanging overhead. Though NeoCon has come and gone, Wolf-Gordon has just begun using the tessellated, prismatic structure for an ad campaign that, for the company's new Chief Creative Officer, Marybeth Shaw, signifies a renewed approach to design and a willingness to take risks. To announce Wolf-Gordon's new face to the world, Shaw enlisted the help of advertising agency Karlssonwilker, who has created campaigns for Adobe, the New York Times Magazine, BMW, Vitra and MTV, among others, and The Guild, a Brooklyn-based design and build collective whose clients include Dior, Louis Vuitton, Nike, Hurley and Diane von Furstenberg. It's a bit of an unexpected mix of talents, to be sure, but Shaw wanted to shake things up. After developing a concept with Karlssonwilker that was inspired by Bruno Taut's 1914 Glass Pavilion, Shaw turned to The Guild, where Creative Manager Graham Kelman translated her idea into a spiky, crystalline form onto which Wolf-Gordon's fabrics, textiles and wall coverings could be displayed. Kelman's first design had between 650-700 prismatic faces with an area far too small to show off the fabric, so Kelman decreased the amount of faces to around 250 while also increasing their individual size. "I increased the largest spike from three to six feet by using a sheet of material per spike side," Kelman said. He was able to decrease "the total number of faces by two-thirds and still retain the aesthetic impact, volume and material" he wanted. Guild_Wolf-Gordon To decide on how to position a combined total of 500 yards of fabric as well as the pieces of mirror used throughout the installation, Kelman "assigned the most dynamic components and mirror panels to the most prominent views within the space." He and Shaw collaborated on the placement of the fabric swatches and then passed their design onto The Guild's Lead Fabricator, Jorge Parriera, who made a prototype he then used to refine CNC cut-files and tool path depths, finessing it "to maximize the bending of the aluminum panels and shear strength that would accumulate as the piece became assembled," Parriera said. "With every component that was added to the structure, new stress points would arise and others would subside. The structure only gained full strength when it was completed." One of the original goals was for the structure to be self-supporting, so The Guild developed a technique of CNC routing and folding aluminum panels like origami to form rigid components. Once fabrication was completed, the entire installation was rigged from a truss in the shop to test its weight, balance and stress points. It was then broken down into eight separate pieces for transportation to Chicago. Guild_Wolf-Gordon "We attempted to develop an 'open crate' system, we spoke about the crutches in Salvador Dali's paintings and about suspending the structure in the truck," said Parriera. "Ultimately, we obsessively protected each point on each spike and turned each segment until it sat naturally. Then we extensively padded the floor of the truck and ratcheted the structures to the wall.  When we got onsite there was no damage." Everything went according to plan during the two-day installation process. Parriera and his small crew simply repeated the trial run they made in their shop back in Brooklyn. All in all, Marybeth Shaw estimated that the canopy cost under $100,000. That's money well spent from her perspective. Not only is she, The Guild and everyone at Wolf-Gordon exceptionally pleased with the outcome, the 40,000-person crowd at NeoCon got the message that Wolf-Gordon is up to something new these days.