Posts tagged with "WNYC":

Placeholder Alt Text

Taking Stock of POPS

Last week, The New York World, a website produced by Columbia's Journalism School, along with WNYC's Brian Lehrer Show completed a crowd-sourced survey of New York City's privately owned public spaces (POPS). The World consulted Jerold Kayden's 2000 tome, Privately Owned Public Space: The New York City Experience, as a guide to gauge whether the private entities were keeping the public parks truly public and user-friendly. Kayden, who is co-chairing tomorrow's Zoning the City conference with Commissioner Amanda Burden, has been the go-to expert on subject since Occupy Wall Streeters took over the world's most famous POPS, Zuccotti Park.  All told, nearly 150 sites out of 391 around New York City were visited and commented on for the survey. The staff at The World are now waiting on documents from City Planning that specify the widely varying agreements that each of the private entities holds with the city.  "We're going to do a certain amount of sorting through," editor Alyssa Katz told AN, adding that the site plans use the survey results and documents "as a jumping off point for more reporting." Even though the the group finished their initial analysis, Katz said editors of site with its crowd-sourced info. will continue to monitor feedback.  The public can still to pop in on a POPS and report back as to whether the parks are locked up and badly maintained or open and well kept. Either way, The World is now keeping tabs.      

Lotsa LaHood

The Daily Show With Jon Stewart Mon - Thurs 11p / 10c
Ray LaHood
www.thedailyshow.com
Daily Show Full Episodes Political Humor Health Care Crisis
Fortunately it has not been all doom and gloom this week for mass transit, as Ray LaHood took a media tour of New York, to plug for High Speed rail, mass transit spending in general, Cash for Clunkers, air travel, safe driving—you name it. He started out at an editors' breakfast at Hearst, where PopMech reports he declared the first $8 billion is coming... soon. Later that night, LaHood stopped by—where else?—The Daily Show, where Jon Stewart tried to pin him down on the same question of where and when, and where LaHood gamely fielded some jokes. The next morning, it was a two-fer at WNYC, where he appeared on The Takeaway to further flog his talking points, raging against digitally distracted drivers and the poor state of air travel, and then, as the video after the jump shows, he took on local interests, discussing the proposed MTA cuts with Andrea Bernstein, as well as a no-go on gas taxes but more transit funding in the next "highway" bill. It's about the smartest transportation talk we've heard in the mainstream in a while.
Placeholder Alt Text

Liz Diller Is Tone Deaf

Or so she just told WNYC. The clip was aired during Morning Edition, but as Soterios Johnson (LOVE HIM!) directed us to the web for a complete recap and more, the interview actually appears to be from yesterday's episode of Soundcheck. Thanks to the magic of the Internet, you can find the full clip above, as well as a video tour after the jump. And as Johnson gamely noted, be sure to tune in Sunday for the building's debut performance, which will air live. Think those improved acoustics carry over to radio. If this weren't enough, Soundcheck host Jonathan Schaefer shares his thoughts on the Alice Tully on the Soundcheck Blog:
Alice Tully Hall is in exactly the same place as it always was; the renovation was unable to change the “footprint” of the hall within the larger building, or to move walls or even seats. These restrictions make the changes that have been made all the more impressive. The vaguely modernist look of the hall has changed to an organic warmth. [...] It used to be that walking into Alice Tully Hall was like boarding a submarine - there was no natural light to speak of, and the lobby had all the charm of a Knights of Columbus hall. Now, everything is glass; you can see across 65th Street, or out to Broadway. It’s a phenomenon familiar to any NYC apartment dweller: you don’t realize how important natural light is to an apartment until you finally get a place that actually has it. Then you wonder how you ever lived in the half-lit dingy old place of yours for so long.
Obviously, Mr. Schaefer is a Manhattanite. We've got plenty of sky here in Brooklyn. Lincoln Centers, not so much, though. We'll call it a draw.