Posts tagged with "Waterfront Development":

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Baltimore’s Port Covington to be the Silicon Valley of athletics wear

South Baltimore’s underdeveloped waterfront neighborhood, Port Covington, will officially become a sprawling new development with 3 million square feet of space surrounding Under Armour’s global headquarters. According to The Baltimore Sun, over the next three years the long-time owner of the site, Weller Development, will build out one-third of the planned apartments, offices, and retail space for the 260-acre peninsula. The development is the 25-year-old vision of Under Armour’s founder and CEO Kevin Plank, who also owns Sagamore Development, which is backing the project. Part of the $5.5-billion plan will include a 50-acre expansion to the brand’s current campus, which sits along the Patapsco River adjacent to the Sagamore Spirit Distillery, the Rye Street Tavern, and The Sun’s facilities. The entire neighborhood will take over two decades to construct and is meant to also exist as a hub for tech innovation and start-up businesses, according to Curbed. Over 10,000 Under Armour employees will commute there once complete and Plank hopes to also attract the creative and engineering communities to live, work, and play. Phase 1 construction includes outfitting the neighborhood with 12 new buildings featuring office space, room for retail, and 1.34 million square feet of residential. A 156,000-square-foot hotel will also rise on the site. Forty acres of new parks and 2.5 miles of restored waterfront will buffer the community, and a new light-rail station will link it to the surrounding enclaves. The City of Baltimore will help develop the needed infrastructure within the neighborhood through a $600-million-dollar Tax Increment Financing deal approved in 2016. This “city within a city” is expected to break ground next year with the three-story market hall proposed for the complex. So far, there’s been no announcement as to which architectural firms have joined the project, though Sagamore Development has released initial designs.
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Retro-futurist tower set to make its mark on eastern New Jersey

Development along New Jersey’s PATH transit line continues to boom, and the latest town to feel the effect is Harrison, Newark's eastern neighbor. As first reported by Jersey Digs, Manhattan’s GRO Architects have been tapped to design a multi-block, mixed-use development that includes what will become the town’s tallest tower. The office tower, with its sloping, biomorphic massing, is set to rise 20 stories and will sit on top of a “floating” retail podium. Both sections will feature rounded punch windows and filleted corners, as well as linear metal fins, used as horizontal louvers on the tower portion. The tower itself will contain an as-of-yet unspecified amount of hotel space and 242,276 square feet of offices, with 15,027 square feet of retail below. The building is just one piece of the Harrison North of Guyon (NOG) project, an 11-acre redevelopment of the land just north of Harrison’s New Jersey PATH station. A large glass wall has been carved from the office tower's skin and will offer up views of the rest of the project to the north along with sweeping views of the adjacent Passaic River, which wraps around and bounds Harrison. The development will include three mixed-use buildings which will all contain residential and commercial space—up to 518 residential units and 85,000 square feet of retail—as well as three or four eight-story parking structures. A public square has also been included, potentially with a movie theater and bowling alley. NOG will be constructed in two phases and will adhere to the Harrison Waterfront Redevelopment plan, which, according to New York YIMBY, advises “neo-traditional downtown styling.” The seven-story buildings will be without front setbacks to encourage walkability, with the ground floors of each set aside for retail. The residential portions will likely contain a mix of studios and one-bedroom apartments. The development will also include a new glassy Harrison PATH Station entrance and capital investments in the surrounding roadways. According to Richard Garber, Partner at GRO Architects, the aim of the project was to create a sense of place in a location frequented by commuters from all over the tristate area. One of the challenges will be to attract residents from Jersey City and Hoboken, other cities along the PATH that are easily reachable from Manhattan. Construction is expected to begin in 2019, with no completion date given at the time of writing.
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Chicago to get a mile-long park and wildlife habitat

A vestige of Chicago’s industrial history is slated for redevelopment as an ecologically focused public space. According to the Chicago Department of Planning and Development, a mile-long stretch of the North Branch Canal will be redeveloped to serve both Chicagoans and wildlife, focusing on the east side of the canal between Division Street and North Avenue, with the plan to be completed by the end of 2018. Financed by Chicago’s Open Space Impact Fees, the Wild Mile of the North Branch Canal would set the groundwork for habitat improvements for fish, turtles, and invertebrates, and create vegetative islands, viewing platforms, and canoe launches, as well as other environmental enhancements. The Wild Mile is a component of the proposed improvement of 760 acres along the Chicago River between Kinzie Street and Fullerton Avenue as a part of the North Branch Framework Plan. The North Branch Framework Plan is integral to Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s Industrial Corridor Modernization Initiative, a multi-year effort to review and refine land use policies in the cities Industrial Corridor System. The plan for the North Branch Canal would include best practices for implementation and details on cooperation with private property owners and developers. Dug to form a shortcut to avoid the bend in the North Branch of the Chicago River, the North Branch Canal was originally completed in 1857 by Chicago’s first mayor, William B. Ogden. The completion of the North Branch Canal created the area known as Goose Island, where industrial development flourished at the turn of the 20th century and is now gaining popularity as a new tech hub in Chicago. “This initiative will improve the North Branch Canal as a truly unique waterfront for the entire city, where visitors will be able to engage and appreciate the city’s ecosystem through unprecedented public access,” said Mayor Emanuel in a statement. The proposal for the Wild Mile comes as Chicago aldermen push for increased public access to the entirety of the North Branch of the Chicago River. Private plans to redevelop the riverfront have recently emerged, such as Sterling Bay’s Lincoln Yards project, which includes the former A. Finkl & Sons steel plant and will deliver residential and office buildings, in addition to a connection to the 606, a 2.7-mile-long linear greenway on the site of a former rail line.
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New Jersey waterfront is transformed in massive $2.5 billion master plan proposal

New York-based Cooper Robertson is set to master plan a $2.5 billion ground-up community along the Raritan River in Middlesex County, New Jersey. The site’s owner and developer, Atlanta-based North American Properties (NAP), announced the project on Monday and released a first look at what would become the largest mixed-use development in New Jersey’s history. Located less than 20 miles from Manhattan and covering a 418-acre site, the new community combines residential, retail, office and hotel spaces with a fully walkable city layout. Named Riverton, the  town will focus on building a street-level pedestrian experience and open waterfront access, including a marina. Cooper Robertson has also filled the plan with public recreation spaces along an unrestricted mile of riverfront esplanade along the Raritan. An update of an earlier 2014 plan, the expanded Riverton will also be the state’s largest brownfield remediation. Besides counting on the proximity of the site to the Garden State Parkway to drive demand, NAP is also banking on an influx of potential residents who have been priced out of New York and are looking for a development with a “hometown” atmosphere. Although none of the others can match its scale, Riverton is the latest project to crop up in New Jersey hoping to court New Yorkers as rents on the other side of the Hudson River continue to rise. Cooper Robertson is no stranger to waterfront development. Besides contributing planning work to Hudson Yards in Manhattan, the studio is currently working on a separate 1,300-acre master plan for the Charlotte River District near Charlotte, N.C. Co-developed with New Jersey-based PGIM Real Estate, Riverton is shovel-ready but is still waiting on a new round of local and state approvals. No estimated construction dates have been released at this time, but NAP hopes to complete the 5 million-square-foot project by 2021.
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Long Island City riverside development would bring Queens one of its tallest towers

New York City’s outer borough may be getting yet another tall tower, as a recently revealed development in Long Island City, Queens, would bring thousands of residential units to an industrial corner of the neighborhood. As the New York Times reports, landlord Plaxall Realty has proposed converting its 15-acre riverside property into a mixed-use development that would include 5,000 apartments, 3.1 acres of public space, and 335,000 square feet set aside for manufacturing. The plan from New York-based WXY lays out not only retail and restaurant options for the site, but an additional 70-story tower that would become one of tallest in Queens if it were actually built. The borough has seen more of these projects lately, with the 984-foot City View Tower still on track to become Queens' first supertall tower. Anable Basin, the 1,000-foot long artificial channel that the development takes its name from, would anchor the 6-block complex. While Anable Basin was used as an industrial shipping port since its construction in 1868, Plaxall wants to modernize the inlet by ringing it with an elevated esplanade, installing flood barriers, and building docks for kayakers. Plaxall, a plastic container company who used to house factories in the area, has also called for the creation of an “innovation zone” in the development. 335,000 square feet of light manufacturing space will be set-aside in a co-working and living style arrangement, and Anable Basin residents could potentially leave their apartments and head straight down to their ground-floor studio space. Such a large project would trigger the city’s Mandatory Inclusionary Housing (MIH) requirements, and Plaxall has stated that approximately 1,250 of the proposed 4,995 units would be affordable. The details released yesterday make no mention of how affordability would be determined. Converting an area historically zoned as industrial will come with a set of caveats. Plaxall will need to have the area rezoned, and may sell the entire parcel even if they can find a development partner. If the proposal moves ahead, the Anable Basin special district would allow the public to access a section of the western Queens’ waterfront that had been closed off for centuries. Already in possession of 13 acres, Plaxall has been confident that the private landlords holding the other two will be on board with the scheme. Paula Kirby, granddaughter of Plaxall founder Louis Pfohl, told the Times that Anable Basin was “a unique opportunity to really make a skyline for Long Island City,” The New York City Department of City Planning will hold the first public comment hearing in early December. Construction is slated to begin in 2020.
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Towering development to reshape Manhattan-adjacent Edgewater, NJ

Four new towers proposed for the eastern shore of Edgewater, New Jersey, are set to bring the tiny borough out of the shadows cast by neighboring Manhattan and Jersey City. Providing approved plans for a site at 115 River Road, New York YIMBY has revealed glimpses into a 1,919-unit project that may jumpstart development in a city that has remained mostly low-slung. Built on top of a 50-foot-tall landscaped podium that covers most of the site, the towers would range from almost 600 to more than 700 feet in height and would be split 50-50 between rental and condo buildings. The site’s developer, Fred Dabies, has also integrated a parking structure within the podium, walkable waterfront access, and proposed a suite of amenities for condo owners. The massive, blockish towers would not only dwarf all other buildings in the surrounding city, but also stand taller than any existing residential developments in Brooklyn or Queens. Waterfront property across New Jersey is becoming increasingly valuable along the Hudson River, as development tries to keep pace with rising costs in Manhattan. With more businesses moving into Manhattan’s Hudson Yards, it’s expected that office workers will continue to seek out housing across the river. Edgewater is no stranger to ambitious proposals. Thanks to expanded ferry service into the city, combined with building booms in neighboring Jersey City and Hoboken, Edgewater has been struggling to retain its share of lower income housing. The city government is currently fighting with a separate developer at 615 River Road over a similar 1,800-unit project, where Mayor Michael McPartland chose to seize the parcel through eminent domain to head off future construction. Divided between a population of longtime locals and former New Yorkers who chose to leave for a more affordable alternative, it remains to be seen if the 115 River Road project will continue in its current form or be scaled back. No completion date or names of attached architects have been announced yet.
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Kansas City officials unveil plans to redevelop the city’s riverfront

The Kansas City Port Authority (Port KC) revealed its master plan to redevelop the city’s riverfront into a live-work-play area last month. Despite roadblocks during the early phase of development, the 80-acre Berkley Riverfront Park redevelopment project plans to make the area into an attractive, high-density mixed-use destination. Union, a mixed-use development by Indianapolis-based Flaherty & Collins Properties, broke ground last year and is on track to open next summer with more than 400 apartments and six acres of retail space. Once completed, the park will have new pedestrian and bikeway paths and have spaces for hosting events like Kansas City PrideFest, Riverfront Fitness, and KC Nanobrew Festival, according to a Port KC press release. The annual July 4 Riverfest is already held in the park. Other amenities and attractions will be built along the water, including a dog park that is slated to be built next year. The city is also looking into the possibility of expanding the streetcar line from the Downtown River Market to the Riverfront for better public access, with a feasibility study coming out in the next few weeks.
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$2 billion waterfront project in Washington, D.C., adds SHoP Architects, Michael Van Valkenburgh, HWKN, and others

It’s awards season, even in the architecture world. This week developer Hoffman-Madison Waterfront (HMW) announced the 11 architects chosen for the second phase of the District of Columbia’s waterfront development, The Wharf. The Wharf is a $2 billion project that runs along nearly one mile of the Washington Channel’s Southwest neighborhood. At completion, The Wharf will bring more than three million square feet of mixed-use space to the D.C. area. Phase 1 of The Wharf project (about 1.9 million square feet of mixed-use development) is currently scheduled to open in October 2017, with Phase 2 breaking ground sometime in mid-2018. “We have selected a diverse group of locally, nationally, and internationally renowned designers, knowing they will bring their talent and expertise to The Wharf, building a waterfront neighborhood that is an integral part of the city,” said Shawn Seaman, AIA, principal and senior vice president of development of PN Hoffman. Washington, D.C.–based firm Perkins Eastman DC will continue to act as the master planners and master architects of The Wharf, allowing for continuity between Phase 1 and Phase 2. Firms (all New York City–based, unless otherwise noted) joining the team are as follows: SHoP Architects will design two office towers in Parcels 6 and 7 with related retail spaces in collaboration with WDG Architecture, who will act as the architect of record. ODA will design mixed-income multifamily apartments and related retail on Parcel 8 of the project, while Rafael Viñoly Architects will add luxury condominium residences in Parcel 9. Morris Adjmi Architects will be designing their first commercial building in Parcel 10, adding more office space to the development. Washington, D.C.–based STUDIOS Architecture has been chosen to design the multi-use marina services building. Hollwich Kushner (HWKN) will be designing the Wharf Marina, and S9 Architecture will be responsible for Wharf Marina Operations and the Cantina Marina Pier. Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates (MVVA) will design M Street Landing, the outdoor space connecting the waterfront to the Arena Stage. Wolf | Josey Landscape Architects will continue their work from Phase 1 of the project, which included the detailing of The Wharf Promenade, The Channel rooftop, and other public space. The first phase of The Wharf will open on October 12, 2017. More information about The Wharf is available here.
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Will the South Bronx be getting a Hudson Yards of its own?

New York State has announced it will cap a South Bronx railyard and build a large development on top to energize the borough's economy.

In late November, Empire State Development put out a Request For Expressions of Interest (RFEI) aimed at developers who could build, a lá Hudson Yards, a platform over a 12.8-acre strip of railyard without compromising the functionality of a critical regional juncture for commercial trains and trucks. The RFEI asks interested parties to present options for the lease or purchase of the land to construct a residential or mixed-use project with a public space component.

“It’s exciting, and very rare to offer the opportunity to develop more than a dozen acres of prime waterfront land in New York City,” said Empire State Development president, CEO, and commissioner Howard Zemsky, in a statement. “This South Bronx location offers easy access to the waterfront, multiple mass transit options, and a major highway and I’m certain that the Harlem River Yards central location and enormous potential will generate great interest from respondents looking to submit creative proposals.”

The land, north of the Willis Avenue Bridge along the Harlem River, is part of a 96-acre tract called Harlem River Yards. The industrial area is state-owned but managed through a general project plan—because of this designation, the state needs no city approvals to rezone and build on the land. In addition to housing and retail, the RFEI calls for parkland that allows access to the waterfront.

The state will continue to use the land as a transfer station even after the new development opens. Interested? Developers have until February 2 to submit a proposal.

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A project in Copenhagen will create three floating classrooms

The capital of the happiest country in the world, Denmark*, will soon get a new multi-purpose waterfront development. This week, Scandinavian architecture firm, C. F. Møller Landscape, won the “Nordhavn Islands” international competition to design part of the waterfront in the growing Nordhavn district, a harbor area in Copenhagen. The firm’s project proposes “an innovative learning, activity and water landscape” adjacent to a planned international school (which C. F. Møller is also designing). Three floating classrooms would give students opportunities to learn outside, even fish and kayak. The design blends a range of concepts—the urban park, the educational classroom, and the recreational community center—right on the waterfront. The Møller proposal features three separate “islands” ringed with low-maintenance plantings: “'The Reef,’ a multifunctional platform for aqua learning and events in extension of the quayside; ‘The Lagoon,' a floating arena for activities such as kayak polo and other water sports, and ‘The Sun Bath,’ an actual harbor bath with a sauna and protected areas for swimming training,” notes the firm in a press release. "We are passionate about creating new urban and landscape spaces that focus on integrating building and landscape because we believe that it adds value to the project concerned and to the city as a whole,” said C. F. Møller head, Lasse Palm, in a statement. Nordhavn Islands and the Copenhagen International School—that will be the largest school in the city—are expected to open summer 2017. *The United States is ranked the 13th happiest country by the way, in a recent report that found correlations between the happiness of a country's citizens with gross domestic product per-capita, social support, health, and other factors.
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ODA reveals Eliot Spitzer–developed stack of boxes in Williamsburg inspired by icebergs

Stacked boxes are all the architectural rage these days—from Bjarke Ingels' Two World Trade, to ODA's Midtown skyscraper, to ODA's Financial District skyscraper, to ODA's Bushwick residential project, to ODA's Williamsburg condos, to ODA's other boxy buildings in Long Island City, Harlem, and the Lower East Side. It should surprise nobody, then, that ODA's latest project will stay true to the firm's trademark form. The New York Times reported that Eliot Spitzer, the former governor and short-lived cable news host, is now heading his father's real estate business and has tapped ODA to design his first project. The $700 million, 856-unit development sits along the East River, directly south of the Williamsburg Bridge in Brooklyn. The project appears as a collection of stacked-box towers that each rise 24 stories. ODA founder Eran Chen said the design resembles a "molded iceberg." (For reference, here are some pictures of icebergs.) Along the river is also a new park and esplanade. "[Spitzer] said he decided to build rental housing rather than condominiums, and agreed to set aside 20 percent of the units for poor and working-class households," reported the Times. "But with Mayor Bill de Blasio seeking to require as much as 30 percent affordable housing for what are known as 421-a projects, Mr. Spitzer wanted to get his project moving before the current regulations changed or expired this month." This did not go over too well with some people on Team de Blasio. The Observer noted that Lincoln Restler, a senior policy advisor to the mayor, shared the Times' story on Facebook and called Spitzer's attempt to keep the project at 20 percent affordable "offensive." A spokesperson for de Blasio told the Observer that Restler's comments did not necessarily reflect the thinking of the administration. Either way, the Facebook post has been deleted.
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Trumped by the Ocean: Hurricane Sandy Squanders Jones Beach Plans

While waterfront development continues uninhibited in some parts of New York City, it looks like Hurricane Sandy has put the kibosh on Donald Trump’s plan for a large catering hall-restaurant complex at Jones Beach dubbed Trump on the Ocean, replacing a former Robert Moses-era restaurant once on the site. From the beginning, Trump faced opposition from the state over the design of the project and spent several years locked in legal battles. Many lawsuits later, Trump and New York State finally came to an agreement this summer. But just when Trump got the green light to move the project forward, Sandy swept the east coast and flooded the construction site. Jones Beach State Park suffered serious damage from the storm and only some areas have been reopened. This past Wednesday, Trump and state parks Commissioner Rose Harvey announced that they will be abandoning the project altogether. The Parks Department hasn’t given up on the idea of building something at the former Boardwalk Restaurant site, but Commissioner Harvey said that “we have concluded that building a major new facility directly on the oceanfront, on the scale of the Trump project, is not prudent policy."