Posts tagged with "WASA/Studio A":

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Brooklyn Bridge Park unveils 14 tower designs amid community debate

All the top names in New York City architecture are vying for a piece of Brooklyn Bridge Park, but whether any of their designs will be realized still remains to be seen. As community groups try to block Mayor de Blasio’s controversial plans to bring affordable housing to Michael Van Valkenburgh's celebrated park, the Brooklyn Bridge Park Corporation has unveiled 14 design proposals for two coveted development sites on Pier 6. Those proposals were unveiled just hours before a Brooklyn Bridge Park Corporation meeting that was packed with community members voicing their strong opposition to any new development in the park. The RFP that the corporation issued in May called for two towers—one 315 feet and the other 155—that are 30 percent affordable. This plan has been met with plenty of opposition, and even a lawsuit, from local groups who claim the towers will block views, eat up green space, and not provide appropriate funding for the park. Under a Bloomberg-era deal, revenue from private development at the park is intended to cover its upkeep and maintenance costs. At the meeting, local residents asked the corporation to reevaluate that plan and pursue other forms of funding. Most were adamantly opposed to new residential towers at the 85-acre park. "This is about developer's greed," shouted one woman during the meeting who was quickly met with applause. There were two individuals with signs that read "Parks for All / Not Condo$ for a Few" and even kids stationed right in front of the corporation's members with homemade signs that read "Save Our Park" and "We Love Our Park." Ultimately, the corporation voted 10-3 not to revisit the funding plan. It will, however, complete a new environmental review of the site. As the Wall Street Journal reported on Tuesday, if the lawsuit can be resolved, a decision on the site should be made by the end of the year and construction could start about year after that. The proposals for the pier, which were barely mentioned at the meeting, came from architects including Morris AdjmiPelli Clarke Pelli,Bjarke IngelsDavis Brody Bond, and Selldorf Architects, among others. You can check out all 14 proposals in the slideshow below, which reveal a wide variety of tower aesthetics rendered with most of the standbys we've come to expect in modern visualizations—hot air balloons, regular balloons, and plenty of birds. Surprisingly, not a single kayak.    
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Dreaming of Development at Brooklyn Bridge Park

Last week, as New York was blindly transfixed on its impending Thanksgiving feast, the Brooklyn Bridge Park (BBP) released renderings of a proposed mixed-use development that has been floated to help fund the waterfront park. Seven proposals stacked, folded, and otherwise covered in plants a program calling for several hundred hotel rooms and residences on two park-side sites on Furman Street. The developer/architect breakdown was full of the regular big names and heavy hitters: Brooklyn's Two Trees selected WASA/Studio AToll Brothers worked with Rogers Marvel; SDS worked with Leeser; Extell went with Beyer Blinder Belle; Dermot with FX Fowle; RAL with CDA; and Starwood teamed with Alloy Development, Bernheimer Architects, and n Architects. Building any new buildings along the park has been a contentious issue, but the tax revenue the new development would generate would go a long way toward BBP's financial sustainability. While architects whipped up some flashy renderings, one aspect seems certain to rouse fans of Brooklyn Heights' elevated promenade. In several of the renderings, views of the Brooklyn Bridge appear slightly interrupted despite guidelines that limit the height of new construction. BBP spokesperson Ellen Ryan told AN that all of the proposals adhere to the Special Scenic View Corridor regulations set forth by City Planning, which are actually lower in height  than the old cold storage warehouses that once stood on the site until the 1950s. The building height limits range from 55 feet on the south parcel and 100 feet on the north. That's not the only thing driving neighborhood angst. The Brooklyn Eagle pointed out that the public only has about four weeks to review and comment on the proposals—until December 22—and at the height of the holiday season rush no less. There's a lot to like about the proposals as well. WASA/Studio A clad their curvilinear buildings with giant green walls with windows poking through while Rogers Marvel and others planted every available rooftop space with green roofing. FXFOWLE's stacked metal-mesh-covered volumes connect to the planned Squibb Park pedestrian bridge, providing direct access to its rooftops in what looks to be a gesture to the High Line. Leeser Architects' futuristic proposal called for a massive atrium filled with a gym and a floating pool, while Starwood's team of Bernheimer and n Architects lifted their proposal to provide views of the park along the sidewalk. Take a look at all of the proposals below and share your thoughts in the comments. All images courtesy respective firms / Brooklyn Bridge Park.
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Building Brooklyn Awards Showcase Green Design

The Brooklyn Chamber of Commerce recently hosted the 11th annual Building Brooklyn Awards, recognizing 13 buildings for innovation in expanding and preserving Brooklyn's built environment. Awards covered a variety of categories including adaptive re-use and historic preservation, mixed-use, education, interior renovation, mixed-use, open space, and affordable housing. In addition to the building awards, the Chamber of Commerce honored Deb Howard, Executive Director of the Pratt Area Community Council and Jed Walentas, Principal of Two Trees Management for their work in restoring and revitalizing neighborhoods Bedford-Stuyvesant and DUMBO respectively. Noteworthy projects include Brooklyn Bridge Park by Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates, Myrtle Hall at the Pratt Institute by WASA/Studio A, Newtown Creek Wastewater Treatment Facility by Ennead Architects LLP; Greeley and Hansen; Hazen and Sawyer; and Malcolm Prime, and Brooklyn Ecopolis by Simino Architects. Each building has been recognized because of its sustainable preservation of and attention to public and private space. Brooklyn Bridge Park Piers 1 and 6 were awarded for design in the Open Space category. From the Brooklyn Chamber of Commerce, "Pier 1 is the only park pier to built on landfill, rather than a pile-supported structure, which allowed for the construction of dramatic topography. The monumental Granite Prospect offers stunning harbor views and utilizes granite salvaged from the reconstruction of the Roosevelt Island Bridge." The pleasant greenery along the waterfront is complemented by its sustainable features and innovative management systems. The Chamber of Commerce recognized Myrtle Hall at the Pratt Institute in Clinton Hill as an example for Education building. Listed as the first LEED Gold certified academic building in Brooklyn, the 120,000 square foot structure "brings design integrity back to the street, along with foot traffic and increased retail vitality." The Newton Creek Wastewater Treatment Facility completed its first phase of a 25 year master plan in Greenpoint. As the Chamber of Commerce noted, "The site addresses the community's concerns about a large and expanding facility of its kind through integrating excellence of design, a phased approach; and providing public art and waterfront park space." Also, visually interesting because "the entire plant is covered in blue light at night, uniting the disparate elements of the facility and providing a glowing visual element against the skyline." The Mixed-Use award goes to Brooklyn Ecopolis, a family-owned five story building designed for different sustainable projects. Currently, "a sustainable coffee shop at the ground floor level, Brooklyn Ecopolis, a non-profit sustainable resource center on the second floor, with the owners living on the residential floors above." The LEED Gold certified project is hoped to inspire the community of Cobble Hill as an example for other structures of its kind.