Posts tagged with "Wang Shu":

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Small Town, Big Bus Stops: International Architects Convene on Austrian Village for BUS:STOP Project

A slew of internationally-renowned architects have convened on the unlikeliest of sites. Krumbach, Austria, a town of less than 3,000 may soon be the location of bus stops designed by Sou Fujimoto and Pritzer Prize Winner Wang Shu among others. The BUS:STOP initiative is the brainchild of kulturkrumbach which managed to entice the heralded names to participate in a bus stop design project with the promise of a free vacation and little else. Ensamble Studio's contribution to the project (Courtesy kulturkrumbach) Along with Fujimoto and Amateur Architecture Studio (Wang Shu's architectural practice), Alexander Brodsky, Rintala Eggertsson ArchitectsArchitecten de Vylder Vinck TaillieuEnsamble Studio, and Smiljan Radic all made the journey to the eastern Austria meaning that 7 countries and 3 continents are represented in the project. Upon visiting the town each architect designed a prospective bus stop and then presented their models in a separate ceremony. While each was envisioned in miniature, a full scale replica of Chilean architect Radic's structure was manufactured and displayed at the exhibition. Each international designer will be accompanied by a local architect to aid in the realization of each project and foster cultural exchange. By and large the proposals depart from the traditional bus stop form. While the designs seem to vary in plausibility, Fujimoto's offering, featuring a spiral stairway to nowhere and entirely lacking a roof, seems particularly problematic. In spite of its small size, Krumbach is no stranger to contemporary architecture. If they are to be implemented, the BUS:STOP creations will join a series of recently constructed noteworthy structures found in the area, including a sleek Bushaltestelle contributed by Austrian studio Hermann Kaufmann in 2011.
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SHFT+ ALT+ DEL: November 16, 2012, Extreme Accolades Edition

'Tis the season for bestowing "Best Ofs", and this edition of SHFT+ALT+DEL includes some of the recent laurels laid upon architects and designers by business and consumer press... Zaha Hadid is named one of Glamour magazine's Women of the Year for 2012. (Glamour seems to have latched onto Condé Nast sibling The New Yorker calling Hadid "The Lady Gaga of Architecture...") Across the pond, David Adjaye is at the tippy-top of the 2013 Power List, ranked number one in the annual publication's list of the most influential black people of the UK. This year's Pritzker Prize winner, Wang Shugets tapped as 2012 Innovator of the Year in Architecture by The Wall Street Journal. South of the border, GQ Mexico named Esteban Suarez of BNKR Arquitectura, pronounced Bunker, Architect of the Year. Congratulations to them all! Meanwhile, back in the salt mines... Kieran Long, architecture critic for The Evening Standard and assistant curator for the 2012 Venice Biennale, takes up the post of Senior Curator of Contemporary Architecture, Design and Digital at the V&A museum in London. Paola Antonelli, MoMA's Senior Curator of Architecture and Design, was appointed Director of Research and Development in October. Her mission: "provide the Museum with information and critical tools to evaluate new initiatives and identify new directions and unexplored opportunities, particularly in the digital realm." The indefatigable Antonelli will divide her time between her previous curatorial role and the new position. Have news on movers and shakers in the architecture & design universe for SHFT+ALT+DEL? Send your tips to people@archpaper.com!
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Breaking> Chinese Architect Wang Shu Awarded Pritzker Prize

Chinese architect Wang Shu has been named the 2012 Pritzker Architecture Prize laureate, marking the first time a Chinese architect has been honored prize which brings a bronze medal and $100,000 purse. Wang Shu is known for building with traditional Chinese forms and materials, often recycling bricks and tiles to form a patchwork mosaic in his buildings, which demonstrate a distinct modern sensibility. He is professor and head of architecture at the China Academy of Art in Hangzhou, China and founded Amateur Architecture Studio with Lu Wenyu in 1998 where he has taken an outspoken stance against architecture that he perceives as destroying vast urban and rural landscapes across China. Amateur Architecture Studio derives its name from the traditional building practices of the amateur Chinese builders who have crafted cities for centuries. He spent years learning from these craftsman and brought back the traditional building techniques to mix with his experimental and site-specific practice at Amateur Architecture Studio. “The fact that an architect from China has been selected by the jury, represents a significant step in acknowledging the role that China will play in the development of architectural ideals," said Thomas J. Pritzker, chairma n of the Hyatt Foundation which sponsors the prize. "In addition, over the coming decades China’s success at urbanization will be important to China and to the world. This urbanization, like urbanization around the world, needs to be in harmony with local needs and culture. China’s unprecedented opportunities for urban planning and design will want to be in harmony with both its long and unique traditions of the past and with its future needs for sustainable development.” Wang Shu has previously been awarded the Gold Prize from the French Architectural Academy in 2011, the Schelling Architecture Prize in 2010, and the Holcim Award for Sustainable Construction in 2005. He also received a Special Honor at the 2010 Venice Biennale and was the Kenzo Tange professor at the Harvard GSD, which has previously been held by Alvaro Siza, Peter Zumthor, and Raphael Moneo among others. He delivered the Tange lecture at Harvard last November titled "Geometry and Narrative in Natural Form," which you can watch below. The formal awards ceremony for the Pritzker Prize will take place in Beijing on May 25.