Posts tagged with "Vitra":

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15 great events to attend during the AIA Conference in New York City

The AIA Conference on Architecture is just around the corner, from June 21 to 23 at the Javits Center in New York City. To add to the excitement, the city will be bustling with architecture events and exhibits, including at MoMA PS1, the Storefront for Art and Architecture, and the Van Alen Institute. Here are our editors' highlights for the week. 1) MoMA PS1 
Young Architects Program Museum of Modern Art 11 West 53rd St. (Midtown) June 18 6:00–8:00 pm. Free. RSVPs required* www.momaps1.org Exhibition reception for 2018 Young Architects Program, featuring finalists LeCAVALIER R+D, FreelandBuck, BairBalliet, and OFICINAA. The winning scheme Hide & Seek by Dream The Combine (Jennifer Newsom and Tom Carruthers), opens to the public June 26. Opening reception, limited space. 2) Night at the Museums Various locations June 19 4:00–8:00 pm. Free. NightattheMuseums.org Fourteen Lower Manhattan museums open their
 doors, free of charge, as part of this annual event. Visit the Skyscraper Museum, African Burial Ground, Museum of Jewish Heritage, South Street Seaport Museum, National 9/11 Memorial, and others. 3) Architecture Books Opening Reception Storefront for Art and Architecture 97 Kenmare St. (SoHo) June 19 7:00–9:00 pm. Free. Storefrontnews.org Now on display at the legendary Steven Holl and Vito Acconci–designed gallery, selection of 100 fundamental books, selected by a jury, based on Storefront’s Global Survey of Architecture Books. On June 26, Storefront will host a conference at the New York Public Library Main Branch (6:30–8:30 pm, free), featuring prominent architects. 4) Solstice: 24x24x24 Storefront for Art and Architecture 97 Kenmare St. (SoHo) June 20–June 21 Storefrontnews.org Making the most of the longest day of the year, 24x24x24 brings together 24 designers to shape a day of programming and contribute a seat for a collective gathering during the summer solstice. From dawn until dusk, 24x24x24 is an experiment in collective production in design, action, and thinking. 24x24x24 is collectively organized and curated by a group of architects who will be taking over Storefront for Art and Architecture from 7pm on June 20 to 7pm on June 21. 5) Mind the Gap: Improving Urban Mobility Through Science and Design Van Alen Institute 30 West 22nd St. (Flatiron) June 20 6:30–8:30 pm. Free. VanAlen.org An examination of how populations move through cities, using tools and methods from neuroscience and behavioral psychology. Organized by the Van Alen Institute. AN’s very own Assistant Editor Jonathan Hilburg will moderate the discussion. 6) Summer Solstice Aperitivo
 Vitra 100 Gansevoort St. (Meatpacking District) June 21 4:00-8:00 pm. Free with RSVP* aiany.org Toast the summer solstice with Vitra and Skyline Design. Aperitivi, live DJ, and special exhibitions. 7) Architecture League Prize 2018: Night 1 Sheila C. Johnson
 Design Center Parsons School of Design 66 Fifth Ave. (Greenwich Village) June 21 7:00–9:00 pm. $10 for non-members. RSVP required* ArchLeague.org Lectures by the winners of the Architectural League’s prestigious annual prize, recognizing the nation’s top young architects: Gabriel Cueller & Athar Mufreh, Coryn Kempster, and Bryony Roberts. Followed by reception 8) Modulightor Building Open House 246 East 58th St. (Midtown) June 22 6:00–9:00 pm. $15. RSVP required* modulightor.com Tour Paul Rudolph’s stunning four-story glass townhouse.
9) Infrastructure: The Architecture Lobby National Think-In Javits Center 655 W 34th St, New York June 22 7:00 am–7:00 pm Prime Produce 424 W 54th St (between 9th and 10th aves) June 23 10:00 am – 7:00pm This Think-In is divided into two parts over two days: active engagement with relevant sessions at the AIA National convention to ensure substantive dialogues on professional issues on Friday, June 22; and Think-In panel discussions on Saturday, June 23 at Prime Produce that examine the theme of Infrastructure. Infrastructure is the network of systems necessary for an organization to function. When those systems are degraded enough, the defining functions of the organization fail. The Architecture Lobby has selected this theme for its first National Think-In to generate a way forward and rebuild our discipline’s infrastructure. 10) Architecture League Prize 2018: Night 2 Sheila C. Johnson
 Design Center Parsons School of Design 66 Fifth Ave. (Greenwich Village) June 22 7:00–9:00 pm. $10 for non-members. RSVP required* ArchLeague.org Lectures by winners of the Architectural League’s prize: Anya Sirota, Alison Von Glinow & Lap Chi Kwong, and Dan Spiegel. 11) A’18 Community Service Day Various locations Check-in: Center for Architecture 536 LaGuardia Place 7:30 am–6:00 pm; reception 6:00–8:00 pm aiany.org/a18 Looking for a meaningful way to spend the last day of conference? AIANY encourages you to volunteer for a half or full day of work that will benefit local nonprofits. Roll
 up your sleeps and pitch in on projects that range from upgrading a church kitchen, fixing a shelter’s community room, working a mobile farmer’s market in an underserved community, and installing infrastructure at a school’s educational outdoor garden. Volunteers will have the chance to make a real difference for these organizations and the people they serve, and
 see parts of New York City that they might not otherwise visit. Collaborating firms include: Cannon Design and Stalco Construction, James Wagman Architect, Murphy Burnham & Buttrick Architects, FXCollaborative, Perkins Eastman, and 1100 Architect. Participants must sign up in advance. 12) Architectural League Prize for Young Architects + Designers
 Arnold and Sheila
 Aronson Galleries Parsons School of Design 66 Fifth Ave.
(Greenwich Village) June 22–23 12:00–6:00 pm. Free. ArchLeague.org Exhibition featuring the 2018 winners of this prestigious prize program. This year’s theme, Objective, asked entrants to consider objectivity and criteria by which architecture might be judged today. 13) Panorama of the City of New York
 Queens Museum Flushing Meadows Corona Park Ongoing QueensMuseum.org Conceived by urban mastermind and World’s Fair President Robert Moses for the 1964 Fair, the Panorama is a 1:1200 scale model of New York City, covering 469 acres and including hundreds of thousands individually crafted buildings. In 1992, the original modelmaker updated the Panorama while the museum underwent its expansion, designed by Rafael Viñoly. 14) New York at Its Core: 400 Years of NYC History Museum of the City
 of New York 1220 Fifth Ave.
(Upper East Side) Ongoing MCNY.org What made New York New York? Follow the story of the city’s rise from a striving Dutch village to today’s “Capital of the World.” Framed around themes of money, density, diversity, and creativity, the city delves into its past and invites visitors to propose visions for its future. 15) Designing Waste: Strategies for a Zero Waste City Center for Architecture 536 La Guardia Place (Greenwich village) Through September 1 CenterforArchitecture.org Waste is a design problem. This show presents strategies for architects, designers, and building professionals to help divert waste from landfills. Curator Andrew Blum will lead tours of the exhibition on Friday, June 22, 10:00–11:00 am, and Saturday, June 23, 11:00 am–12:00 pm. This exhibition is based on the Zero Waste Design Guidelines and supported by the Rockefeller Foundation. Text by AIA City Guide, Storefront for Art and Architecture and AN.
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Designing an office chair that doesn’t “murder architecture”

Architecture and design studio Barber & Osgerby recently spent over four years working with Vitra to design the Pacific Chair, an office chair “for the next generation,” or as Jay Osgerby put it, “a chair that won’t cause a panic attack.” It debuted at this year's Neocon to much fanfare. While it's yet to be confirmed, rumor has it that Foster + Partners already ordered the Pacific Chair for its San Francisco office. Osgerby discussed the involved process with managing editor Olivia Martin. The Architect’s Newspaper: Tell me a little bit about the design evolution for the Pacific Chair. Jay Osgerby: It started four years ago. The idea was to design a “checklist chair”—something that would check all the boxes big corporations require of a chair. We had never done a chair like that before and were incredibly naive. We said, “awesome, great, that shouldn’t be too complicated”… then we started and realized it was fantastically complicated. We quickly realized why all these office chairs look like machines, and in some cases like a dentist chair. We wanted to create something calm and appealing to architects; maybe something that you would want to have at home. We wanted something relaxing, something that wouldn’t give you a panic attack but would still perform. To find the answers to those requirements was really hard. One of the ways we started to approach the project was from a mechanical point of view. We placed the main mechanism and controls in the bottom of the seat. This mechanism responds to the user’s weight, so whether you are heavy or light, you’ll have the same experience sitting in the chair, which eliminates the need for a lot of levers. The other big breakthrough was to get rid of the arm structure so that it also emerges from the seat. Normally the arms come in from the side of you and this creates extra bulk. With each step and each iteration, we wanted to clean it up, to make it more discreet and more simple. So that’s how the design evolved really from briefing to being a reductive piece, something that’s essential. With open offices, it’s no longer about creating this territorial chair for one person, but a chair that can adapt to any user. The office space is constantly evolving. Now it’s all about open plan, sit-stand desks, alternative workspaces, etc. Did you think about these changes when designing the chair? The traditional office is going the way of the dining room. Coworking spaces are killing the office. It’s not bad, but I think there are issues with it. We’d seen these shifting workplace trends in our architecture practice: The freedom that technology has brought us creates a need to make furniture that works in all sorts of different environments. I spend a lot of time in the Ace Hotel in Shoreditch and the lobby is packed full with people working and spending a fortune on really expensive coffee in order to have colleagues for a day. The freelance economy is really what we were thinking of because the stereotypical office chair looks so alien in those environments. We wanted to create a chair that can sit in any of these places as well as Bank of America. What’s amazing about that is that the Pacific Chair has been so widely accepted—it’s in Norman Foster’s office in San Francisco, for example. How does your background in architecture inform making these types of products? Well, we are not qualified architects but we both studied architecture and that enabled us to appreciate how objects are in space. Specifically, an interior site gave us the context and the aesthetic judgment to make something calm. Architects all know how hard it is to spec something that doesn’t murder your project. You spend four to five years on a project, then you put in the office chairs and it creates chaos because the chairs are rarely seen in isolation, they are seen en masse, which destroys the architecture. Our architectural sensibility told us to create something that enhances the space.
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Specsheet>The latest in stylish contract seating

Versatile contract seating offers comfort, durability, and high style. Trea Humanscale Reminiscent of the vertebrae in the human spine, Trea is designed to protect the body. The subtle curve and pivoting backrest provide the user with a natural reclining position that maximizes comfort. Available with three different base options, this Todd Bracher design is now offered with upholstered seats. Telo Lounge Sebastian Herkner for Cappellini This multipurpose lounge-table combo can stand alone or be combined to create informal meeting spaces or larger rows ideal for waiting rooms and lounges. Sebastian Herkner’s design for Telo was inspired by the camp seats he experienced in Afrikaans lodges; it's available in four stainless-steel color options and grosgrain upholstery. Jif Allseating This multipurpose stool has the ability to keep people moving, which in turn increases productivity. A “waterfall edge” provides relief to hamstrings, while the sway base engages the core and promotes active sitting, a major component of Allseating’s product development philosophy. Soft Modular Sofa Jasper Morrison for Vitra A nod to art deco, the Soft Modular Sofa by Jasper Morrison plays off his approach to “super normal,” a term he coined to illustrate that pieces should be “understated, useful, and responsible.” The low-slung sofa could easily fit in any home and is constructed with a spring core and various foams to ensure that it maintains its shape in high-traffic settings. Caprice Chair Philippe Starck for Cassina Philippe Starck’s classic Caprice chair has been updated for contract applications—with the intention of combining the comfort of an office chair and the elegance of a dining seat. The sleek shell is now available with a four-spoke base that can be specified with or without wheels, and a flared support that can be customized in two new matte shades: white and mud. Enea Cafe Stool Coalesse and Enea Available in bar and counter heights, the Cafe stool’s wood legs add a bit of warmth to hospitality or workplace environments. The new styles are available with polypropylene, wood, or upholstered seats with a natural oak base.

Reach a new level of sustainability using LEED certified metal materials from Móz Designs.

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MIPIM Day Two: Modeling and mapping the Responsive City

MIPIM takes place in the most complicated, counterintuitive series of convention halls on the Mediterranean waterfront. In trying to find the basement registration hall I ran into Ben Van Berkel who tried to help, but was having his own problems finding the ‘innovation forum’ that is the center of the architecture presentations. He claims he attends every other year because he can meet, in two days, 15 to 20 old and potential new clients. In the forum, we heard HOK present their Responsive Cities project that mines municipal data and then expresses it in maps that can be used by architects to drop future projects into and understand how they interact with the existing city. They showed a HOK sports stadium that might then become a useable bridge and public space during the day when it is not used for sports events. Speaking of models, MIPIM has a collection of the most fantastic scale models of cities like London and Istanbul that are enough of a reason for the design press to come to this event. This technical forum then morphed into a talk by Arik Levy, the Israeli/French designer who showed how to create value through the placements of art in projects and also bring culture to the places where working people spend their days. The forum was sponsored by Vitra, and they used their famous Swiss campus as an example of high design to super-charge daily life. We also met with Asudio, a young firm of ex-Foster employees who started up during an economic downturn and were able to get a series of schools projects that taught them to work efficiently and on-budget to produce impressive low-budget public work. They have also just started a new venture '63,000 Homes' that they hope can steer clients into creating work with innovative plans, uses, and architecture Asudio showed a new project that was meant to be a single commercial building, but they convinced the client to create two buildings that used a heat exchanger to transfer the daytime heat generated for the commercial space to heat the residential spaces when they needed the warmth during the day. There seem to be no end of the high technological solutions to everyday urban problems here at MIPIM. More tomorrow.
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2015 Best of Products Awards> Finishes + Surfaces and Interiors + Furnishings

On a hot day in June, a jury convened to review nearly 400 entries to The Architect’s Newspaper's first Best of Products competition. Submissions, divided over eight categories, abounded in new materials and exciting technologies, provoking a lively dialogue during the evaluation process. Colin Brice of Mapos, Barry Goralnick of Barry Goralnick Architects, Harshad Pillai of Fogarty Finger Architecture, and architect Alison Spear generously contributed their considerable expertise and insight to the judging. While the complete roster of winners can be found in our just-published print edition, AN will be publishing the results daily over the next week. Today’s categories, Finishes + Surfaces and Interiors + Furnishings, evidenced a trend toward dramatic design. FINISHES + SURFACES Winner Raw Concrete 4004 Caesarstone This surfacing material emulates the raw look and texture of concrete, while providing the durability of quartz. The non-porous slabs are heat-, stain-, and scratch-resistant, and require no sealing. Suitable for use as countertops, vanities, flooring, wall paneling, furniture, and more, the 56 1/2-inch by 120-inch panels are available in three colors and in fourteen edge treatments. Honorable Mention ViviGraphix Spectra Glass with Zoom Images Forms+Surfaces ViviGraphix Spectra Glass consists of a graphic interlayer laminated between two panes of glass. Zoom Images, a portfolio of nature-themed photography, significantly expands the possibilities for bringing beauty to large-scale glass applications. Created using sophisticated gigapixel image-capturing equipment, Zoom Images are thousands of individual photographs that are stitched and stacked together to form a single large-scale, super-high-resolution photo. Because of their extraordinary scale, the images are able to retain their clarity at very large sizes. Zoom Images are accessible through Zoom Digital Darkroom, the manufacturer’s interactive online design tool. Honorable Mention Gyptone BIG Curve CertainTeed Ceilings These perforated acoustical gypsum panels can be formed into highly curved ceilings without the cost and time associated with custom fabrication. At only 6.5 mm thick, Gyptone BIG Curve can be dry-bent to a 10-foot radius, and can achieve up to a 5-foot radius by wet bending. The panels are made of 85 percent recycled content and certified for low-VOC emissions, which contributes to sustainable building standards and helps maintain high indoor air quality. Fitted with an acoustical backing tissue, the panels are available in three perforation patterns. INTERIORS + FURNISHINGS Winner Ikaros Koleksiyon Designed for the modern mobile worker, this sofa features cleverly designed “wings” that neatly create horizontal work surfaces on three sides of the piece. The extension off the backrest is at table height, so it can be used as a desk by a person seated in a chair behind the sofa. This aspect of the design allows Ikaros to be used simultaneously from inside and outside, providing people with an inviting and inventive locus point for collaborative work. Designed by Koray Malhan. Honorable Mention Allstar Vitra Allstar contains the all the functional features of an office chair—a synchronized mechanism with lockable positioning, seat depth and height adjustment, and an adjustable backrest—in a design that suggests a relaxed, residential feel and sense of familiarity. The chair comes in a variety of colors and fabrics; leather upholstery is available. Designed by Konstantin Grcic. Honorable Mention Parti Ceilings Plus Parti utilizes complex, continuous perforation patterns that extend beyond the boundaries of individual ceiling and wall panels to give the illusion of depth to two-dimensional surfaces. Integrated LED lighting is optional; mechanical, electrical, plumbing, and other building systems are readily accommodated by Parti.
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Product> Working It: New Office Furnishings

Although the office-as-playground concept still has legs among the creative class of businesses, workplace interiors are showing signs of maturation. While communal desking remains popular, more contract suppliers are developing solutions to the acoustic and storage issues that are symptomatic of what some view as the overly-open office plan. Allstar (pictured at top) Vitra A looping polyamide armrest distinguishes the design of Allstar, and represents the main structural element on which the mechanical unit of the chair is hinged. Fully adjustable, the chair is available in a variety of colors. Designed by Konstantin Grcic. Steeve Arper Customizable in a wide range of fabrics, leathers and finishes, Steeve’s three versatile, modular components—bench, armchair, and sofa—can be arranged to accommodate any interior space allowing for countless configurations. Steeve’s silhouette is solid and architectural while at the same time appearing slender, light and volumetric. Its uniquely manufactured seamless back and arm covers are stretched to fit the frame; an industry innovation that eliminates the need for more complex upholstery techniques. This technique highlights Steeve’s clean design while plush interior cushions provide a soft seat. Available in a choice of base styles. Designed by Jean-Marie Massaud. sixfivezero Seating Coalesse These wood chairs are stackable up to six high for efficient storage. A wide range of shell, base, and upholstery choices allow for a myriad of finish combinations. Coordinating tables are available. Designed by Lievore Altherr Molina. Concierge Bernhardt Design Sleek and versatile, the Concierge is a workstation that can be customized to fit specific needs. The design lends itself to incorporate televisions, whiteboards, and charging stations for both laptops and mobile devices. Offered in five materials, two heights, and six base options. BuzziFalls BuzziSpace Patterns are CNC-cut into two layers of proprietary acoustic felt. The product can serve as a decorative room divider or be hung in front of a wall, acting as dimensional wallpaper with acoustical properties. Designed to be hung from a ceiling fixture, it comes with a metal profile and a set of cables. Available in seven motifs and two sizes. Designed by Sas Adriaenssens. Bloom Kimball Casual and sophisticated, Bloom fits comfortably in a variety of settings. United by the same base design, the lounge chair offers a tailored seat with optional contrasting fabric, while the occasional tables come in a range of shapes, heights, and materials.
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Back in Green: Jean Prouvé furnishings reissued and retooled with a little help from Rem Koolhaas

More than seventy years after their creation, a collection of classic office furniture by Jean Prouvé is being updated and released to the market. Dutch fashion purveyor G-Star, in conjunction with Swiss furniture manufacturer Vitra, have developed "Prouvé Raw," a collection of ten pieces that include chairs, desk and wall lighting, conference tables, and writing desks. And Rem Koolhaas also plays a role in this revival. In 2014, OMA and Koolhaas completed a new headquarters for G-Star. Observing an affinity between the architecture and the Prouvé pieces that was mirrored by the design philosophy of the fashion house, a decision was made to outfit the offices, conference rooms, and canteens of the new building with the seven-decade-old furnishings. In cooperation with the Prouvé family, Vitra adapted the French designer’s furnishings to meet the needs of today’s office. Desks have been modularized, and fitted with concealed runs for cables and pop-up power outlets. The swiveling desk chair has a more stable five-branch base. Teaming up with art directors at G-Star, color and material palettes were created that are true to the aesthetic of both Prouvé and the Dutch company. Several shades of industrial green, and leather and fabric upholstery complement the steel and solid-wood furnishings. The Prouvé Raw collection debuts next month at Salone in Milan.
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Vitra and Carl Hansen & Son celebrate new Culver City showrooms and iconic design

Last week Vitra and Carl Hansen & Son joined up to celebrate the opening of their new and expanded Culver City showrooms at 8745 and 8753 Washington Boulevard. Vitra's gallery, encompassing two floors enlarged to 3,550 square feet by Tiziano Barachino and Oakes Architects, is based on the firm's concept of "Citizen Office," in which free-flowing workspaces and information are available everywhere. The space contains several workstations as well as formal and informal meeting spaces and lounges. 

Carl Hansen & Son's 2,800 square foot showroom, located inside the Helms Bakery, houses the company's Danish classics inside a unified space. Surfaces include stainless steel and natural wood walls, and exposed bow-truss beams, and large storefront windows. Furniture includes work by Hans J. Wegner, Kaare Klint, Ole Wanscher, and Tadao Ando. CHS-05
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On View> Philadelphia Museum of Art shows off design objects by Vitra

  Vitra—Design, Architecture, Communication: A European Project with American Roots Philadelphia Museum of Art, Perelman Building, Collab Gallery 2525 Pennsylvania Avenue, Philadelphia, PA Through April 26, 2015 In its new exhibition, Vitra—Design, Architecture, Communication: A European Project with American Roots, the Philadelphia Museum of Art explores the history of the famous Swiss furniture company from its early licensing partnership with Herman Miller to new collaborations with world-renowned contemporary designers, such as Verner Panton, Antonio Citterio, and Jasper Morrison.     Vitra’s evolution will be tracked through a collection of about 120 design objects, furniture, models, publications, and videos. This will be supplemented by archival material and historic objects from the Vitra Design Museum in Germany. These materials include a plywood toy elephant by Charles and Ray Eames, a series of Alexander Girard’s Wooden Dolls, and George Nelson’s 1948 furniture catalogue for Herman Miller.
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Artek Joins the Vitra Family

On September 6, 2013, Vitra announced it acquired Artek. The Finnish furniture company was established in 1935 by architect Alvar Aalto, his wife Aino,  Maire Gullichsen, and historian Nils-Gustav Hahl to produce furniture that promoted modern living. Over the company’s last 80 years, it has expanded its business to include rights to Ilmari Tapiovaara’s furniture collection and collaborations with renowned designers and artists such as Shigeru Ban, Eero Aarnio, and Enzo Mari. Artek will continue operations as a separate entity but it is anticipated the purchase will expand the furniture company’s reach further beyond Finland, where contract and residential domestic sales account for 60 percent of its business. “The international dimension, which was a clear goal already in Artek’s founding manifesto of 1935, needed to be revitalized,” said Artek’s CEO Mirkku Kullberg in a statement. “That arena is where we want to be and alliances or ownership arrangements are one way of building the future.”   As synergies between the two companies are explored, Vitra will support Artek’s ongoing production of Aalto’s iconic lighting and furniture designs. “The Finnish design company is more than a collection of furniture; like Vitra it is a commercial-cultural project which plays an avant-garde role in its sector,” said Rolf Fehlbaum, a member of Vitra’s Board of Directors, in a statement. “For Vitra it is important that Artek can continue and further develop this role.” Vitra endeavors like the Vitra Design Museum, workshops, publications, and special collections and archives could be influential outlets for collaboration between the companies. For the last 20 years, Artek has been owned by Proventus, a privately held European capital development firm. Currently owned by Robert Weil, the company was established in Stockholm in 1969. Over the last 40 years, the investment firm has concentrated on the business of cultural institutions such as the Jewish Theatre in Stockholm, the Israeli Batsheva Dance Company, and Culture without Borders.    
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Prouve RAW’s New York Preview

Jean Prouvé plus G-Star? The coupling at first seems an unlikely one, and not just because it is partially posthumous. But the fashion forward Dutch company, best known for its high-end jeans, counts the self-taught French architect and designer (1901-1984) among its inspirations. Two years ago G-Star called Vitra, who has owned the manufacturing rights to Prouvé's furniture since 2001, and asked if the designer could come out to play. The result is Prouvé RAW, the latest edition in G-Star's Crossover Series, design experiments that pair G-Star with designers outside the field of fashion. Prouvé classics like the 1951 Direction Office Armchair No. 352 (above) are reimagined as formal replicas in contemporary materials. The collection was first unveiled on June 15 at Art Basel but makes its New York debut today, marking the start of a two-week preview (and pre-purchase) period before the line officially goes on sale in October. The launch was timed to coincide with the tail end of New York's Fashion Week, with the idea that denizens of the runways might also be lured by a different kind of G-Star model, now posing in Vitra's Meatpacking showroom. From the full collection of seventeen pieces, including chairs, tables, lamps, screens, and storage furniture, only the nine now on view at Vitra will be available for purchase. Amelie Znidaric, a curator at the Vitra Museum in Weil am Rhein, Germany, said that, ultimately, the new collaboration is a fitting one. "Both Prouvé's furniture and G-Star jeans are in essence very industrial and in that sense rough, but each of their final products is actually very refined and elegant. That shared sensibility is why the two go well together. G-Star didn't impose crazy fashion design ideas onto an already perfect piece. They chose neutral colors, like brown and beige, and materials that only enhanced the Prouvé." A few notable before and afters: the sheet metal tractor-style seat of the Tabouret No. 307 stool gets a smooth red or white plastic seat in the new edition; the lacquered metal table top of Table S.A.M. Tropique becomes stainless steel; the leather upholstery of the Direction Office Armchair No. 352 is translated into charcoal cotton twill giving it a more practical appeal and, in today's market, price: the new chair will retail for $3,600, while the 1951 original has recently sold at auction for $80,000. As with any re-edition, the patina of the classic version has been replaced with a shiny newness that can be disarming. But Catherine Prouvé, the designer's daughter and manager of his estate, gave Vitra the go-ahead to work with G-Star, and in a short film about the project produced by Vitra, comments that her father would have enjoyed the opportunity to revisit his designs with fresh eyes. Indeed, the designer's dedication to the idea of durability and portability in furniture, which also extended to his architecture, somehow jibes with the go-everywhere role of jeans in contemporary culture. Joris Aperghis, G-Star's chief marketing officer who was in New York for the launch, said that the goal of G-Stars collaborations--others have included Range Rover and Cannondale bicycles--was to bring "high-end, luxury quality items to a mass audience." When luxury goes mass, how does it retain cachet? Limited availability. The Prouvé RAW collection is only on offer through November 2012.