Posts tagged with "Vincent Scully Prize":

Placeholder Alt Text

Architecture critics Inga Saffron and Robert Campbell receive the 2018 Vincent Scully Prize

Inga Saffron of the Philadelphia Inquirer and Robert Campbell of the Boston Globe are the recipients of the 2018 Vincent Scully Prize. Awarded annually by the National Building Museum in Washington, D.C., the prize honors design professionals who have shown excellence in practice, scholarship, or criticism in the field. This year’s winners—both Pulitzer Prize–winning journalists—are admired for their commitment to providing insightful critiques of the built environment. The Vincent Scully Prize was established in 1999 and first awarded to Yale University professor Vincent Scully, who died last December. Past recipients include Jane Jacobs, His Royal Highness Prince Charles, the Prince of Wales, the late Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown, Paul Goldberger, Robert A.M. Stern, and more. Landscape architect Laurie Olin was given last year’s prize. The National Building Museum will hold a public award ceremony for Campbell and Saffron on Monday, October 29 with a conversation moderated by The Chicago Tribune’s Blair Kamin.
Placeholder Alt Text

Goldberger Discusses Themes for Scully Prize Speech

It's been quite a year for architecture critic Paul Goldberger, and almost as dizzying for his readers as for him. But the The New Yorker's loss has turned out to be Vanity Fair's gain, giving the glossy additional gravitas. Now the National Building Museum has added Goldberger to its illustrious roster of Vincent Scully Prize winners. "I don't know that I'll ever be on another list that includes Prince Charles and Jane Jacobs," Goldberger said in a telephone interview. The speech he plans to deliver at the museum on Thursday, November 15th will hit on themes that many in the profession have been mulling over for the course of this tumultuous year in the architectural press: the state of architecture criticism, the changing role of mainstream media in a digital world, and the rise of citizen journalists. "It's a paradox about the great degree of interest in architecture and yet a diminishing amount of outlets," he said, wondering out loud whether the buzz in social media is the equivalent of what is being lost in the general media. He added that it's a complex issue when a mass of voices drown out the opinion of the specialist. "There is a profound value to expert guidance," he said. The very heart of his career is based on sharing architecture with a mass audience in an unpretentious manner—and Goldberger, an avid Tweeter, said he wouldn't consider reversing course. "My whole life has been trying to communicate to a broader general audience; that's the most important thing of all to me," he said. "But I feel that things have gone too far—crowdsourcing doesn't always bring you where you want to be." He paraphrased literary critic Daniel Mendelsohn, saying the critic's first allegiance is to his subject and not his readers. "In other words he's not interested in crowd pleasing," he said.  Goldberger didn't shy away from addressing the fascistic dangers of applying the same theory to architecture as to criticism. Nevertheless, the tendency to crowdsource architecture, like crowdsourcing criticism, creates a cacophony, not a vision. "Democracy is a great thing but it doesn’t always lead to the best architectural decisions," he said. "Committees can make things happen, but they can't create works of art."