Posts tagged with "Videos":

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The Grand Macau Hotel: Zaha Hadid Behind Parametric Addition to Chinese Casino Resort

Zaha Hadid has designed another seemingly-structurally-impossible parametric building form that is set to touch down in Macau in 2017. The building, which could be equally at home in Miami or Dubai, is a large block that has been punctured by three curvaceous openings. The entire mass is encased in an exposed exoskeleton that twists and turns along the structure's contours. The project was undertaken at the behest of Melco Crown Entertainment, casino magnates who have contributed the City of Dreams resort to the gambling-soaked Chinese island. The developers commissioned Hadid to create the fifth hotel located on the property, which will top out at 40 stories and house 780 rooms in over 1.6 million square feet of space. Other expected amenities include luxury retail, specialty restaurants, spa facilities, a roof-top pool, and a number of gaming areas. The external latticework varies in patterning as it crawls up the structure's facade. It is densest at its middle, where it navigates the irregularities of the design's central void, and becomes more elongated at each of the building's poles. The interior is more angular, awash in crystalline glass outcroppings subdivided by triangular grids. These walls collide with the curved base of the structure's opening to create a 130-foot central atrium that welcomes arriving visitors to the hotel. Construction for the newest member of the City of Dreams is already underway.
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#Amtrak Appeals to #Millenials in New #Video Touting Glamour of Train Travel

Amtrak is out with a new promotional video, and it’s targeted right at millennials. As UrbanCincy reported, “On the heels of kicking off their new Writers Residency program, where writers can ride intercity passenger rail for free, Amtrak welcomed 30 prominent new media ‘influencers’ on a long-distance train ride from Los Angeles to SXSW in Austin.” These initiatives are part of Amtrak’s larger goal to increase ridership outside of the Joe Biden demographic. To boost their street (track?) cred, Amtrak, set their new, trendy video to "Busy Earnin’" by Jungle, which is a #cool #song. During their journey, the "influencers" shared their experience on twitter by hashtagging their way to the festival. But Amtrak knows that increased inter-city rail travel will take more than high-speed wifi—it will take high-speed trains. And across the midwest, at least, Amtrak is working on just that by boosting service and speeds  between cities like Chicago, Detroit and St. Louis. [Via Streetsblog.]
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Help Imagine a “Past Whose Future Never Arrived” with Imaginary Archive in Kiev

Since 2010, New York–based artists and theorists Gregory Sholette and Olga Kopenkina have invited people around the world to imagine "a past whose future never arrived." Through their ambitious installation, Imaginary Archive, participants can interact with both real and fictional “printed matter, small objects, artist’s books and self-published narratives" to envision alternative political and cultural histories. The installation has appeared in New ZealandIreland, and Austria, and, if their new IndieGogo campaign is successful, it will arrive Kiev, Ukraine next month. For Sholette and Kopenkina, the country's current political upheaval provides a unique opportunity for their work. They write, "With the future of the country teetering in maximum uncertainty, the need for intense artistic reflection and discussion of historic choices and possibilities is as great as ever."

Transforming an Austrian Construction Site into a Choreographed Dance

Turns out the biggest construction site in Europe has got some moves. And all it takes to turn 42 cranes into a nimble-bodied dance troupe is some light choreography, a techno beat, and a fair amount of neon lighting.  The dance, or the Krenasee event as it is officially known, took place in Austria last month at the site of a planned 20,000-square-foot suburb called Urban Lakeside Vienna. FilmSpektakel caught the action in all of its glory and put together this impressive time-lapse video. [Via Gizmodo.]
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ASLA’s New York chapter announces winners of 2014 design competition

The New York Chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects announced the winners of their annual Design Awards. For the 2014 edition, 5 submissions received honors and additional 13 were chosen for merits from a field of 70. Participants from various New York-based firms provided designs for sites found within the city as well as other parts of the country. Award-recipients will be displaying their designs at the Center for Architecture beginning on April 3rd through the end of the month. Native Plant Garden, New York Botanical Garden The 3.5-acre installation by Oehme van Sweden Landscape Architects features a large pool fed by cascading water surrounded by native flora. Wooden boardwalks lead visitors through a variety of settings illustrating the diversity of the local landscape.  The garden is consciously designed to illustrate how the landscape responds to seasonal shifts. SIRR Coastal Protection Plan, SCAPE Landscape Architecture In the wake of Hurricane Sandy, ex-mayor Michael Bloomberg instituted the Special Initiative for Rebuilding and Resiliency. SCAPE played an important role on the multidisciplinary team, collaborating with engineering and planning firms to consider urban responses to climate change and the destruction it fosters. The SIRR report established a series of short and long-term goals that transcend the traditional mono-infrastructural solutions of seawalls and floodgates. Southern Highlands Reserve, W Gary Smith Design This private garden in Western North Carolina is dedicated to the preservation and research of the plants of the Southern Appalachian Highlands. Smith's design entails a number of pathways that offer diverse experiences through distinct planting strategies. The 120 acres are also populated by outdoor gathering spaces created by more heavily manicured stonework. West Point Foundry Preserve, Mathews Nielsen Landscape Architects Mathews Nielsen created a sustainably designed park for this historic location in upstate New York noted for its role in Civil War weapon manufacturing. The plan makes use of existing walkways and rail lines to connect ruined structures and educational displays and establish a narrative for the site. The minimally invasive park takes pains to preserve and highlight the natural ecosystems that surround the foundry. Chelsea Cove, Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates This riverfront park extends over three piers to provide 8.5 acres of open space to the surrounding neighborhood. A land bowl helps to shelter to the majority of the lawn from the adjacent West Side Highway and the site counts an entrance garden, sculpture installation, carousel, and skate park amongst its amenities. Offering expansive views of Hudson, special engineering efforts were undertaken to ensure that the park was resilient and sustainable in the face of rising water levels and extreme weather. The following projects were listed for Merit Awards: Brooklyn Bridge Park, Pier 5, Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates The Deconstructed Salt Marsh, SCAPE Landscape Architecture Gateway at the State University of New York, College of Environmental Science and Forestry, Andropogon Associates Harlem River Promenade, Starr Whitehouse Landscape Architects and Planners Hallet’s Cove, Starr Whitehouse Landscape Architects and Planners Hudson Square Streetscape, Mathews Nielsen Landscape Architects Into the Woods, Nancy Owens Studio Midtown Manhattan Sky Garden, HMWhite Site Architects Rainlab at Dalton School, Town & Gardens Swingtones, Strafford, Supermass Studio Landscape Architecture Tongva Park & Ken Gensler Square, James Corner Field Operations Reconstruct Forest Edge, Keith LeBlanc Landscape Architecture Zones of Experience: Symbolism as a Master Planning Tool for St. John’s University, Louis Fusco Landscape Architects

The MoMA Folk Art Museum Debate, Now on Video

The Architecture League of New York has released a video of the discussion convened last week to discuss to MoMA's planned expansion. The move, which entails the demolition of the adjacent American Folk Art Museum, is a contentious one and has sparked much debate within the architectural community. Tuesday's conversation included contributions from the Museum's director, Glenn Lowry, Elizabeth Diller (principal of Diller Scofidio + Renfro, who is overseeing the project), and a slew of other architects, journalists, and theorists who all questioned MoMA's decision to do away with their Tod Williams Billie Tsien-designed neighbor.
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Student’s Puzzle Facade Project Is an Architecturally-Scaled Game

In his school project, Puzzle Facade, Spanish designer Javier Lloret decided to transform the exterior of an Austrian museum into an interactive piece of architectural entertainment: a giant Rubik’s Cube. Lloret wirelessly connected a 3D-printed handheld cube to a laptop responsible for controlling colors on the facade of a nearby building roughly shaped like a cube: the Ars Electronica in Linz, Austria. The building proved to be an ideal canvas for the project as it was already furnished with an LED-lit media facade. The cube is equipped with electronic components enabling it to keep track of its orientation and subsequent rotations. The data is sent wirelessly via Bluetooth to a nearby laptop which runs software specifically designed for the project. The software enables the building to change color each time the handheld interface-cube is moved and twisted. Solving your own Rubik’s cube is difficult enough, but the 3D-printed controller for this larger-than-life version of the game presented even more challenging obstacles. The cube is white, making it harder for those who have memorized the color pattern of a regular Rubik's cube to solve the game. Moreover, due to the location and nature of the building, the player is only able to view two facades at the same time, which increases the difficulty in solving the puzzle. Javier Lloret developed this project as part of his thesis at the Interface Culture master program at the Universitat Kunstlerische and Industrielle Gestaltung Linz.
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Lighting Designers Give New Life To an Abandoned Finnish Silo

Punctured and illuminated, an oil silo on the Helsinki coastline has been recast as a permanent art installation. Silo 468 was commissioned in part to commemorate the city's 2012 appointment as a World Design Capital. Madrid-based Lighting-Design Collective were brought to the Finish city for the drastic transformation project. A pattern of perforations coats the former silo. Horizontal bands of perforations wrap around the exterior, intersected by irregular vertical streaks whose path follows that of the patterns of rust that once consumed the metal exterior. By day sun pierces through to dapple the interior of the space with ever-shifting shadows. On the outside of the structure LED lights nestled in each opening produce shimmering effects that mirror the play of light on the surface of the surrounding water. Once night falls the building acts as a canvas for a dramatic light show generated by the area's prevailing winds, a move that is not without precedent in lighting design. The ebb and flow of this display is meant to recall the movements of flocks of birds that frequent the seaside location. Harnessed by custom software that responds to its environment, the organic engine driving the light shows means that no pattern will ever repeat itself. The red paint that coats the inside of the building tinges the light show in order to create a distinct viewing experience for visitors to the inside of the building. Located in Kruunuvuorenranta district, the 52 foot silo is visible from central Helsinki.
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Bikers Go Airborne: Foster + Partners’ SkyCycle Would Wind Through London

Foster + Partners have collaborated with London landscape architecture firm Exterior Architecture and urban planners Space Syntax in developing a proposal for an extensive system of elevated-bike paths in London. The project entails the construction of over 130 miles of pathways along routes that parallel those of an existing system of rail lines that already weaves in and around the city. Suspended above the train tracks, cyclists would access SkyCycle through the over 200 hydraulic platforms and ramps that would act as entry points. While somewhat evocative of New York's own High Line, the precedent for the project actually goes back much further. As illustrated in the accompanying promotional video, the project would essentially segregate cyclists from their fellow residents navigating London in cars or by foot. The move comes on the heels of a spate of cycling-related deaths that plagued the city last year. Foster himself is an avid cyclist and the current president of Britain's National Byway Trust. London bikers will have to bide their time before taking to the air, however. If the proposal is to be realized, there are many hoops to jump through, including fundraising. SkyCycle would likely be completed sometime after 2030. While the use of the rail corridors has been framed as a cost-saving measure, estimates for an upcoming 4 mile trial route place costs at £220 million.

Sunday> Special Screening of “The Human Scale” Announced

This Sunday the Tribeca Grand Hotel will be hosting a screening of Andreas Dalsgaard's documentary, The Human Scale.  Sponsored by the Tribeca Trust, the film will be followed by commentary from architectural critic and author Michael Sorkin. The movie examines human happiness within the context of urban life and was screened in New York last year as part of the Architecture and Design Film Festival.  Tickets for the event can be purchased here with all proceeds benefiting Tribeca Trust's public space initiative.  
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Tomas Koolhaas Starts Kickstarter for “REM” Documentary, Interviews Kanye

Last year, just around this time, AN sat down with Los Angeles-based cinematographer Tomas Koolhaas to discuss his highly anticipated film, REM, about his Pritzker Prize-winning father. Casting aside the dusty architectural documentary formula of conceited talking heads and lifeless shots of seemingly uninhabited buildings, the younger Koolhaas set out to explore the “human condition” around some of his father's most high profile projects. Now the film is nearly complete, but with grant money running dry, the filmmaker has turned to Kickstarter to pull in the final funds to push through the post-production process, and has released two new clips to promote the project: the film’s first official trailer and an interview with "the Rem Koolhaas of hip-hop," Mr. Kanye West. As Tomas Koolhaas told AN last year, "my concept has always been more focused on human interaction with the work, just because I find that more interesting, and it’s the least explored aspect." From "free runner" bouncing off the walls of the Casa da Música in Porto, Portugal to Chinese migrant workers constructing the CCTV building in Beijing and a homeless man spending his days within OMA's Seattle Central Library, Koolhaas' film seeks to capture a variety of modes of interaction that people and buildings engage in. By turning his attention towards these real-life stories that highlight the diverse intersections of human life and architecture, Koolhaas hopes to capture varied social, physical, and cultural experiences of a building instead of the same armchair theories that are fed to us in most design documentaries. And what does Kanye West have to do with all of this? Why don't you just watch and see for yourself.
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Koolhaas Flag Inspires Designer Skateboard Deck Pattern

Since 2011, skateboarders from all over Europe have flocked to a large concrete slab in OMA’s Museum Park in the city center of Rotterdam as a local spot for tricks and meetups. Nicknamed “Rem’s Flag,” the spot is painted with a massive 492-foot version of the EU Barcode, a multi-colored barcode design by architect Rem Koolhaas, conceived as an equal display of the flags of the European Union. Various objects have been “barcoded” with the Koolhaas flag. The most recent is a set of 80 limited edition skateboard decks, a collaboration between surf-inspired skateboard brand Dufarge and AMO, an OMA think tank, in honor of the Rem’s Flag skating experience. For skaters at Museum Park, the EU Barcode at Rem’s Flag is a challenge: only the best can land their tricks on its straight lines. Working with Generator, a Southern California–based custom skateboard company, Dufarge and OMA scaled the barcode to screenprint on each hand-numbered deck. Taking care to match the country-representative colors exactly, the high quality boards honor Koolhaas’ design and the OMA urban space that has become iconic in the skateboarding world.