Posts tagged with "Videos":

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Fly through Zaha Hadid’s sand dune-inspired headquarters with this flashy new video rendering

In December, we told you about Zaha Hadid's plan to build a sand-dune inspired, net-zero, headquarters in the United Arab Emirates for Bee’ah, a waste management company based in the Middle East. Now there's more. https://www.youtube.com/watch?t=11&v=FtuhC_Po7YY The firm's announcement came with plenty of eye candy in the form of glossy renderings, but now, thanks to a very stylized fly-through, we have an even better sense of what Hadid has planned for the desert. Take a look at the video below to literally see the 75,000-square-foot building light up before your eyes. [h/t Dezeen]
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AN’s own Susan Kramer appears in New York Times video on Union Square

In the latest installment of its by "Block by Block" video series, the New York Times explored Manhattan's thriving Union Square neighborhood. The video kicks off with AN's very own Susan Kramer, who is a long time resident of the area. Check out the video below to learn about Union Square's fascinating evolution, and to see what locals like Susan, and restauranteur Danny Meyer, have to say about living and working in one of New York's most bustling areas.
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Shanghai Talks> Christopher Drew, director of sustainability for Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill

Last September, the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat invited me to serve as the special media correspondent for its Shanghai symposium, entitled Future Cities: Towards Sustainable Vertical Urbanism. I conducted video interviews with dozens of architects, developers, building managers, and others on topics relevant to tall building design and sustainable urbanism. Among the many designers, engineers and other tall building types I interviewed was Christopher Drew, director of sustainability for Chicago's Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture. In Shanghai's Jin Mao Tower, we talked about responsive design and environmental technology—everything from greenery and air quality to geothermal energy and the possibilities of net-zero skyscrapers. “It's not going to suddenly happen, it's going to happen incrementally,” he said of net-zero tall buildings. “I absolutely believe it's possible.” His comments on disaster and climate resilience were also revealing. In addition to buildings being resilient, Drew said communities need to be able to react to changing weather patterns—perhaps by relocating or changing local land-use and zoning patterns. Ultimately the sustainability director for the firm behind Saudi Arabia’s Kingdom Tower and 215 West 57th Street in New York City was hopeful. “We do have a whole opportunity to build our way out of this, but we can't do it just on our own,” he said. “It has to be through collaboration with the supply chain … we also have to work with the legislators.” Watch more videos on CTBUH's website, and on YouTube. You can subscribe to the monthly video series here.
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Architecture takes a front seet on this new film centered on Borromini’s architecture

The word "sapienza" means “wisdom” in Italian. It also refers to the Church of Saint Yves at La Sapienza, 1642–1660, designed by Baroque architect Francesco Borromini. In Eugene Green's film, La Sapienza, Borromini is a hero of the protagonist, architect Alexandre Schmid (played by Fabrizio Rongione). Borromini incorporated the remains of a 14th century church, rather than razing it, a touchstone for Schmid. Geometry reigns throughout: the building is capped by a corkscrew lantern, and triangles and semi-circles are combined with figurative elements. https://youtu.be/H943BAOUdJ8 We see Schmid lauded with prizes signaling the pinnacle of his career. He then has a meeting with an obstinate client who wants to take the guts out of his bucolic planned community and make it into a featureless block. Given an ultimatum, Schmid decides to take a break and head to Italy to follow Borromini’s architectural trail to resume a long gestating book project. He spends time in Rome (in particular at La Sapienza), the city where Borromini was first great friends and then rivals with Gian Lorenzo Bernini. Borromini's work was overshadowed by Bernini and Pietro da Cortona, who were favored by Sir John Soane and others, which Schmid wants to rectify. On Alexandre’s architectural pilgrammage, from Stresa on Lake Maggiore, to Turin, Rome, and finally Bissone, he is joined by Goffredo, a young Italian who is about to start architecture school in Venice. Through them, we lovingly see Borromini’s architecture which also unlocks and mends their psyches. La Sapienza, directed by Eugene Green, will have its U.S. theatrical premiere on March 20 at the Lincoln 
Plaza Cinemas in New York City followed by release in select U.S. cities. The film was an official selection at the New York and Toronto Film Festivals.
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Eavesdrop> Ferry Fiasco: Ice shuts down ferry service on New York City’s East River

  As AN reported, it will be quite difficult for New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio to pull off his plan to launch a five-borough ferry system. There are, of course, the obvious issues surrounding subsidies, ridership, operators, and dock placement that could all cause major headaches down the road. While the mayor starts charting his path through these details, another potential problem came to the fore: winter weather. https://vimeo.com/119709319 Specifically, a partially frozen East River. Just weeks after de Blasio announced his five-borough ferry plan, Gothamist reported that the East River Ferry had to discontinue service at least once because boats could not make it through the ice. On its website, New York Waterway, which operates the East River Ferry, explained that the river (technically an estuary) is extremely unpredictable over the winter and that conditions can change within minutes. This, it said, can disrupt the schedule and lead to the temporary closure of certain stops. “We hope that you can understand,” it wrote on its site, “and won’t hate us forever.” It is not you we hate, East River Ferry operator, it is this never-ending winter. https://twitter.com/eastriverferry/status/567044595859869696 https://twitter.com/eastriverferry/status/569922481802375168
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Washing your hands will never be the same with this award-winning faucet’s swirling lattice of water

If you're trying to up your faucet game and new fixtures just aren't doing the trick—we've got the perfect piece to impress your dinner guests when they visit the powder room. Simin Qiu, a student at the London Royal College of Art, has designed a faucet that releases water in an elegant latticework pattern. Finally, water from the tap won't just lazily fall into your sink basin, resigned to its dreary passage into the sewers; it will do it with pizzaz! To give the water that distinctive, swirling effect, Qiu used three ratchet wheels, two turbines, and two springs within the faucet. "The Swirl," as it is called, is not just designed to make water more aesthetically pleasing - it is designed to use less of it, too. Qiu said the one-touch fixture would put out 15 percent less water than the typical faucet. The Swirl won a 2014 iF Design concept award, and now Qiu is reportedly in the prototype stage of development. Speaking of cool water things, check out the video below that explains how a speaker and camera can be used to make water look like it is frozen in place. No, not like ice. Like frozen flowing water. https://vimeo.com/111032701 [h/t Beautiful Decay]
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This year’s architecturally inspired films at the 2015 Slamdance and Sundance film festivals

This year’s Park City offerings at the Sundance and Slamdance film festivals ranged from portraits of architects, a mayor with architectural dreams, a victim of the foreclosure crisis, those trapped in physical and dreamed spaces, and individuals exploring the cultural landscape. Always a harbinger of what is coming up, look out for these films and media projects coming to a screen near you. https://vimeo.com/117273601 Concrete Love. Gottfried Böhm, the only German architect ever to be lauded with a Pritzker Prize (1986) is part of a long line of architects, from his grandfather, father, wife, and three of his four sons. The film’s title refers not only to the Brutalist architecture he favored, but also the love between husband and wife, father and children. Concrete is a shape shifter, a malleable liquid that takes the form of its mold—an apt metaphor. The filmmaking is a sensitive, knowing guide that is as reflective of the creative process as the architectural work itself. A model film which won this year’s Goethe Documentary Film Prize where the jury noted “the film tells a multi-layered tale of love, the passion for architecture and four generations of German history. With sensitive observations, intimate interviews and stirring filmic explorations of an extraordinary architectural legacy, the film creates a lasting impression of the buildings and the people.” Chinese Mayor. This is a rare look at the inner workings of a Chinese city that is remaking itself under an ambitious mayor, Geng Tanbo, who permitted a film crew to follow him around for three years. His goal is to transform China’s coal capital, Datong, population 3.4 million, into a city of culture by rebuilding the structures of its heyday 1,600 years ago including city walls with museums inside, and grottos with Buddhist sculpture and murals—all without residents. He states that Datong can be a new Paris or Rome. This necessitates tearing down much of the existing city and relocating 30 percent of the population or a half million residents, giving the mayor the nickname “Demolition Geng” or “Geng Smash-Smash.” There is not an architect or planner in sight. One of the more interesting meetings takes place with a large group of other Chinese mayors and party secretaries who are all rebuilding their cities into cultural meccas (it is worth noting that mayors are appointed, not elected). Geng deals with corruption (a shady developer made off with $12 million), incompetence (sewer pipes too narrow), shoddy work (paving without cement), delays (hospitals and roads are way behind schedule) until he is suddenly removed from office and transferred to another city, leaving 125 construction projects in Datong halted indefinitely. 99 Homes. Against the backdrop of the 2008 housing foreclosure crisis, a hard-working and honest man (Michael Shannon), cannot save his family home. A real estate shark throws him a lifeline—an offer to join his crew and put others through the same harrowing ordeal of throwing families onto the street that he experienced in order to earn back his home. A portrait of a man whose integrity has become ensnared in this recent American meltdown. The Wolfpack. Locked away from society in public housing on the Lower East Side, the Angulo brothers learn about the outside world through the films that they watch, which they re-enact with homemade props and costumes. Everything changes when one of the brothers escapes, and the power dynamics in the house are transformed. A claustrophobic environment explodes. Forbidden Room. Guy Maddin’s familiar art-house filmmaking takes the locales of “forbidden” spaces—bathrooms, submarines, volcano, caves, elevators and gets lost in non-linear, episodic, absurdist storylines. An ode to the silent movie era, the visuals, sound and story are layered, while color schemes morph into one another. The Nightmare. Following his exploration of the hotel that inspired Kubrick’s The Shining, director Rodney Ascher now investigates the phenomenon of sleep paralysis, the trap between the sleeping and waking worlds. Eerie dramatizations of what the subjects see are created in an architectural moodscape. New Frontier exhibition, Dérive. In this installation, in the distance, you see a city glistening in the dark. The closer you get to it, the larger the city grows until it engulfs you in its presence. This interactive projection is driven by the viewer’s body motions to explore 3-D reconstructions of urban and natural spaces that are being transformed according to live environmental data, including meteorological and astronomical phenomena. Station to Station. Visual artist Doug Aitken embarked on a nomadic experiment of art creation, exhibition and participation in summer 2013 (see AN coverage of its launch from Williamsburg). Station to Station chronicles a train that crossed North America over 24 days making 10 stops, with a rotating roster of artists, musicians, and curators, who collaborated in the creation of recordings, artworks, films, yurts and happenings, across the country. Comprised of 61 individual one-minute films that form a high-speed trip through today’s culture. Films/Media Directors: 99 Homes, Ramin Bahrani Chinese Mayor,Hao Zhou Concrete Love, Maurizius Staerkle Drux Dérive, François Quévillon Forbidden Room, Guy Maddin, Evan Johnson The Nightmare, Rodney Ascher Station to Station, Doug Aitken The Wolfpack, Crystal Moselle
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This 400-foot-high hammock in the Moab Desert is a mid-air playground for climbers in Utah

A hammock suspended 400 feet above ground in Utah's Moab Desert has become an aerial playground for the professional base jumpers and highliners who flock to the canyons every year. https://vimeo.com/114147105 Satirically named the “Mothership Space Net Penthouse,” the approximately 2,000 square foot hammock was wrought by climber Andy Lewis with the help of 50 base jumpers using basic rope weaving techniques. Airspace being so vast, the climbers used to embark on their respective adventures while rarely rubbing elbows. Lewis’ pentagon-shaped net was hence conceived as a high flyer’s executive club, to borrow his sarcasm, and is now a mid-air hub for socializing, rest, and play. Base jumpers leap daily from the man-sized hole in the center of the hammock, while highliners attempt to tightrope-walk across the five legs of the net, some of which span 262 feet. Overhead, paragliders fly by while dropping wing-suit pilots from high above. In 2012, Lewis created a three-sided “Space Thong” (below) with a similar design but comparatively smaller, to bring together climbers who had come from all over the world to partake in the annual GGBY Highline Gathering (an unofficial gathering of slackliners from all over North America) and the Turkey Boogie, a Thanksgiving get-together for base jumpers.
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Animated film shows how growing up with modernist architect parents comes with its own challenges

A short film called Me and My Moulton by director Torill Kove takes a humorous look at growing up with parents who are "modernist architects"—and it's been nominated for an Academy Award under "Best Animated Short Film." Told from the perspective of of a seven-year-old middle child, the challenges of growing up with architect parents include three-legged dinner table chairs and a house that your friends think is a bit odd. https://vimeo.com/109925764 Kove went on with a series of other shorts such as "Five Sure Signs Your Parents Were Architects" told by the same narrator (watch it below). Our favorites include "all your clothes were made of Scandinavian curtain fabric" and "your furniture...was not safe." Watch other shorts like "Redesigning Christmas" and "Party Time" on the film's website. Kove previously won an Oscar for his film The Danish Poet. [h/t Archdaily.] https://vimeo.com/113020492
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Watch the last person in Los Angeles skateboard through abandoned highways and streets

abandoned-la-01 While Los Angeles is trying to shake its image as a city of cars, it sure has a lot of roads and highways. And unless you're behind the wheel, you probably won't be able to play in the middle of them (unless you're headed to CicLAvia). Then comes along filmmaker Russell Houghten, who captured an eerily abandoned LA in his short film, Urban Isolation. https://vimeo.com/91085172 In the film, above, a lone skateboarder navigates the grossly out-of-scale streets, on ramps, and even major highways in LA. No cars or trucks are in sight and it feels like the film's hero could be the last person on earth. Urban Isolation was created for the competition and film festival REDirect, "a celebration of skateboard filmmaking between Red.com and TheBerrics.com." Take a look at the beautiful video above.
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Watch Renzo Piano talk about reinventing the shopping mall in a San Francisco suburb

Last summer, AN reported on Renzo Piano's City Center at Bishop Ranch, the architect's re-invention of the typical shopping center, mixing walkability, culture (including an integrated performance stage), community (including a public "piazza" space") and commerce. In a new short film about the project, Piano spoke about keeping people outside, creating open and transparent storefronts, making a building that will "practically fly above the ground." https://vimeo.com/110900031 The project, located in San Ramon, a remote eastern suburb of San Francisco, centers around the plaza, which is surrounded by six raised glass pavilions. Piano explained how he is creating a suburban building that is nonetheless unpredictable, natural and "very California." "After a while you hear a little bell ringing," explained Piano, of his design process epiphany. "This is not a shopping mall. It's something else."

AN Video> Tour Philly’s future Reading Viaduct with the designers behind the visionary linear park

https://vimeo.com/120168095 The Architect's Newspaper is introducing a new video series focusing on the places, people, and processes behind news-making projects. We begin with a tour of Philadelphia's Reading Viaduct, an abandoned rail line that advocates hope to transform into an elevated park, a grittier take on Manhattan's celebrated High Line. With the city and state pledging millions toward the project, the Viaduct park is moving closer to reality. Come along with us for a first look.