Posts tagged with "Videos":

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Video> Zaha Hadid battles for her Tokyo Olympics Stadium project

In an attempt to salvage the now-scrubbed project, Zaha Hadid has released a new video in defense of  her firm's design for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics Stadium. The film presents a robust—albeit familiar—argument for the reinstatement of the building. Once the bona fides of the project team (which includes Arup Sports) are revisited and a sensitivity to Japanese culture is declared, the oblique blame game begins. https://vimeo.com/137299144 Citing the substantial investment that's already been made in developing the project, Team Hadid suggests that the construction bidding process be restarted, in an attempt to reduce the estimated $2-billion-plus cost to erect the stadium. From the video: "To start the design from scratch is an unnecessary risk, which we think the government should reconsider if its aim is to achieve a lower price...we believe the answer is to introduce more competition between the contractors, but not to lose the benefits of the design." So far, there has not been a response to the video from Olympics officials.
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Los Angeles unleashes 96 million “Shade Balls” into its reservoirs to help conserve water

What appears to be an explosive invasion of tiny black orbs is actually one small part of the solution to Los Angeles' four-year drought. Colloquially called "shade balls," these 36 cent buoyant spheres are a part of a $34.5 million water quality protection project by the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP). The department deployed the last 20,000 of the approximately 96 million shade balls this past week. The simple technology helps prevent water contamination and evaporation. According to NPR, LADWP General Manager Marcie Edwards applauded the innovative alternative to a dam and tarp solution, which would have cost a whopping $300 million. "This is a blend of how engineering really meets common sense," Edwards told NPR. "We saved a lot of money; we did all the right things." The 4-inch-diameter polyethylene balls, produced by California startup XavierC, help slow evaporation and are chemically coated to block ultraviolet rays that can potentially cause a chemical reaction that could produce the cancer-causing chemical bromate. The hollow, water filled plastic spheres are expected to save 300 million gallons of water annually, enough to quench the thirst of 8,100 individuals a year.
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Could evaporating water be the newest renewable energy source? Columbia researchers harnesses the power of bacterial spores

A biophysicist at Columbia University has discovered how to tap evaporating water as an electrical energy source using a simple device made from bacterial spores, glue, and LEGO bricks. Ozgur Sahin’s findings operate at the cellular level, based around his research on the Bacillus bacteria, a microorganism commonly found in soil—and its implications could potentially be far reaching. In high humidity, the spores absorb moisture from the air, expanding up to 40 percent in volume. In dry conditions, the reverse occurs. “Changing size this much is highly unusual for a material that is as rigid as wood or plastic, said Sahin, associate professor of Biological Sciences and Physics at Columbia University. “We figured that expanding and contracting spores can act like a muscle, pushing and pulling other objects. We noticed that we could harness the motion of spores and convert it to electrical energy.” Sahin’s prototype generator is modeled after a wind turbine, which captures kinetic energy and converts it into electricity. Attached to the generator is a flexible, elastic rubber sheet coated in a thin layer of spores. Using a fan and a small container of water, Sahin’s team showed that dry laboratory air and the evaporating moisture from the surface of the water can cause the entire sheet to curl up and straighten, rotating the turbine back and forth to yield electricity. “The biggest form of energy transfer in nature is evaporation. Our climate is powered by evaporating water from oceans and we have no direct way of accessing this energy,” Sahin pointed out. In a paper published in Nature Nanotechnology earlier this year, Sahin and his team, ExtremeBio, consisting of collaborators from Harvard University and the Loyola University Medical Center, showed that these spores produced a thousand times more force than human muscles, and that even a little moisture from evaporation could trigger movement strong enough to be harvested. “The subtle phenomenon of evaporation has big potential. This may be an opening for a completely new energy platform,” said Sahin, whose findings also bode the possibility of developing environmentally benign batteries and engineering stronger materials that mimic muscular movement in robots and prosthetic devices. Pound for pound, the spores pack more energy than other materials used in engineering for moving objects, according to Sahin’s paper. The ramifications are simply enormous in terms of energy savings for the construction and other industries, as well as possibly circumventing the depletion of fossil fuels. In an online issue of Nature Communications, Columbia University scientists reported the development of two novel devices powered entirely by evaporation – a floating, piston-driven engine dubbed the Moisture Mill, which generates electricity and causes a light to flash, and a rotary engine that drives a miniature car. Both devices contain a thin layer of spores. When the evaporation energy is scaled up, researchers predict that it could one day produce electricity from giant floating generators on bays or reservoirs, or from huge rotating machines like wind turbines that sit above water.
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See this majestic aerial drone footage of Jordan’s breathtaking canyons, ruins, and architectural history

Travel and lifestyle brand Matador Network released breathtaking footage of an aerial fly-over by drone, offering a soaring bird’s-eye-view of Jordan’s architectural marvels. The drones freewheel between the canyons, whose goosebump-raising majesty dwarfs the buildings carved right into the sandstone cliffs. The Monastery in the lost city of Petra, one of Seven Wonders of the World, makes an appearance, the structure itself so gargantuan that the doorway alone is seven stories high. Shot by Scott Sporleder and Ross Borden with the latest high-tech DJI Inspire and DJI Phantom 2 drones, as well as a GoPro Hero 4, the footage then transports you to the Roman Colosseum–like South Theater in the Greco-Roman city of Gerasa, now known as Jerash, last inhabited 5,000 years ago. The inhabited cities of Jordan also appear as ruins from afar, their facades of a similar sandstone ilk to the ruins lost to the Western world after Christ.
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Video> Shum Yip Land’s Peter Kok on green skyscrapers and keeping East Asia’s skylines unique

This Fall, I served as special media correspondent for the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat‘s September symposium in Shanghai. The topic was “Future Cities: Towards Sustainable Vertical Urbanism,” and among the many architects, engineers and other tall building types I interviewed was Peter Kok, associate general manager of Shum Yip Land, the commercial property arm of Shenzhen Investment.

Kok shared his thoughts (along with others at the conference) on how to avoid homogeneity among skylines worldwide. “The problem with all the new buildings, new hotels is people don't recognize the city,” said Kok. “So I think we need to add some cultural elements to it.” He mentioned incorporating local materials into new construction projects, as well drawing on local traditions of vernacular architecture. And, Kok said, nature should be part and parcel with high-tech urban skyscrapers. “We should not only see nature,” said Kok. “We should be part of it and mingle with it so you can really enjoy nature in these high-rise buildings.” Watch the full video interview embedded from YouTube, or here on CTBUH's website, along with the rest of the videos in the series.
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Video> Historic hotel demolished to clear way for Detroit’s new Red Wings hockey arena

The implosion of an historic Detroit hotel on Saturday helped clear the way for a $650 million hockey arena that developers say will more than pay for itself in economic ripple effects, but critics see the demolition as the latest casualty of an ill-conceived scheme receiving public financing. COURTESY OLYMPIA DEVELOPMENT OF MICHIGAN The Red Wings will skate in a new arena slated to open in September 2017, the team and owner Mike Ilitch announced last year with splashy renderings and a pledge to "stabilize and develop dozens of underutilized blocks, create more jobs more quickly, and allow the city to spend public funds on other priorities.” But coming just weeks after Detroit became the largest city to declare bankruptcy in U.S. history, the Red Wings' management came under fire for their plan to use $283 million in public money (mostly in the form of tax increment financing). Vacant since 2003, the 13-story Park Avenue Hotel apparently stood in the way of the new arena's loading dock. Designed by Louis Kamper and completed in 1924, the Park Avenue Hotel was demolished over the weekend, its collapse captured in the drone video above. Since its glory days as a symbol of glitz in ascendant Detroit, the hotel had become a senior housing center and later a rehab facility. Locals gathered to bid the building farewell, reports the Detroit Free-Press. Meanwhile the public financing of arenas including the Red Wings' has sparked debate about whether wealthy private interests need such incentives from cash-strapped municipalities and states. The same day Detroit leveled the Park Avenue Hotel, late-night comedian John Oliver ridiculed the taxpayer funding of sports arenas on HBO, calling out the Red Wings and Ilitch in particular. The Red Wings responded today with a statement, saying "This project is about so much more than a world-class sports and entertainment arena; it's about transforming a core part of our city for the benefit of the entire community.” They did not, however, address Oliver's disdain for Little Caesars pizza, which Ilitch founded. 05-detroit-red-wings-district 04-detroit-red-wings-district
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See the Grand Palais submerged in a virtual waterfall in 3D projection mapping design by Japanese art collective teamLab

Recently, Paris’ Grand Palais was awash in the cascade of a virtual waterfall, transforming the beaux-arts palace into a captivating scene from the lost city of Atlantis. TeamLab, a Japanese collective of technologists and artists, used 3D projection mapping to create the holographic play of light and shadow, while maintaining a fidelity to the laws of physics. The artists calculated the movement of the waterfall by creating a 3D model of the Grand Palais des Champs-Élysées in a virtual computer environment and allowing water to cascade over it. “The water is expressed as continuum of hundreds of thousand of water particles that flow in accordance with how the computer calculates the interaction of the particles,” teamLab explained in a post on its website. “Once an accurate water flow simulation has been constructed, 0.1 percent of the water particles are selected and lines drawn in relation to them. The waterfall is expressed as the combination of these lines.” The torrents of water fall with arresting slowness and are deflected as they “collide” with the silent statues and columns of the magnificent building. TeamLab, the brains behind Tokyo’s interactive hanging gardens and LED Christmas trees, programmed a slight time lag into the cascade as a nod to their Japanese ancestors, who perceived time and space as “on a longer axis.” The artists allege that only if one “does not feel a barrier between them and the waterfall,” or, in other words, cedes their full attention, can the viewer truly experience the artwork’s underlying intent. The projection mapping light show was created as part of the Art Paris Art Fair 2015.
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Watch OMA partner Ellen van Loon and MAB Development discuss the de Rotterdam tower

Last September, the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat invited me to serve as the special media correspondent for its Shanghai symposium, entitled Future Cities: Towards Sustainable Vertical Urbanism. I conducted video interviews with dozens of architects, developers, building managers, and others on topics relevant to tall building design and sustainable urbanism. Among the many designers, engineers and other tall building types I interviewed were Jos Melchers of MAB Development & OMA partner Ellen van Loon. We discussed the design of De Rotterdam, an innovative mixed-use development that won CTBUH's 2014 Best Tall Building award for Europe. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OygY60WSibU De Rotterdam's design resembles several skyscrapers stacked closely together, with bridges and protrusions in the facade connecting them into a single, flowing mass. "What you do in a low-rise city, where buildings are very close to each other with different functions, is now basically translated into a high-rise building," said van Loon. "I think what is interesting for me about this building is that tenants see each other on different heights... so not only the physical connections, but the view connections create a community in that building." Van Loon said it was a challenge to temper the community-building aspect of the building's connections with their potential to create confusion in the program or an overwhelming presence on the skyline. The result was the largest building in the Netherlands, but one that developer Jos Melchers said still respects the site. Getting tenants on board was another challenge at first, he said, but now the unusual layout is "becoming part of the city." "You feel that you can make a really mixed-use, multifunctional building," Melchers said. "The tenant has to believe in the concept of a vertical city. Of course tenants want to have their own block, their own building."
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Every year, a community in Peru rebuilds this 230-foot suspension bridge out of local grasses

Every year, one of the world’s most tensile rope suspension bridges—straddling a 230-foot-wide canyon in Peru—is handwoven from dried grass. In deference to elemental wear-and-tear, the bridge is painstakingly reconstructed every year by Quechua-speaking communities on either side of the chasm in a ceremonial ritual lasting three days, always ending in song and dance. https://youtu.be/dql-D6JQ1Bc The builders harvest q’oya grass to be woven into large cables. They begin with a small cord which is twisted together from local grass, and then weave it with 30 more small cords to form a larger rope. For the next few hours, the community engages in cordial games of tug-of-war to stretch the large ropes out, which are subsequently woven and twisted. Finally, three of these large ropes are braided together to form the cables that will support the bridge, with the bridge’s architect, Victoriano Arizapana, weaving on one side and a worker on the other until their ends merge. More tugging of the finished rope ensues to increase the structure’s tensile strength, after which the community carries the cables down to where the bridge will be installed. “The work my father gave me to do, I started doing when I was 12 years old. I love that bridge Q’eswachaka very much. In other words, I love it like a son,” Victoriano said in the documentary The Bridge at Q’eshwachaka by the National Museum of the American Indian. The old bridge is used to run the first cable across the gap. After disposing of the old bridge with a cursory toss into the river below, the community anchors the four supporting cables to stone abutments on either side of the canyon before weaving the handrails. This unflinching routine has been repeated every year in the same location since the time of the Inca, and the modus operandi, based on rudiments cascaded from generation to generation by Victoriano’s ancestors, has not changed. The bridge is also very strong—able to be safely traversed by dozens of people simultaneously. Song- and dance-filled celebrations abound upon the bridge’s completion as the communities celebrate their collective, handmade linkage.
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Tadao Ando opens up about his first New York City building, architecture as living light, and an early career in professional boxing

New York developers Sumaida & Khurana are breaking architectural ground with a series of residential buildings in New York City designed by architects who have never built there before. Their first is a seven-unit beaut by Tadao Ando—called ICHIGONI (152) or 152 Elizabeth—set to bring glass-smooth concrete and highly detailed steel to Manhattan's Nolita neighborhood. And now Ando is opening up about its design. https://vimeo.com/130195081 AN previously covered the project's design by Ando and Gabellini Sheppard:
According to Ando, “A living space should be a sanctuary,” and for the NoLita project, the team has chosen a natural material palette that creates spaces that compress and expand while giving “life to light and water,” according to Michael Gabellini, principal of Gabellini Sheppard. Concrete solids give way to voids of glass and light. “Concrete is a very democratic material, very accessible,” Gabellini explained. “It doesn’t create a gap between the rich and poor like some other materials.”
Now, design video 'zine Nowness has released a video interview with Ando, where he speaks about his design philosophy and process in his native tongue (with captions, too). In the video, Ando said, "A living space should be a sanctuary. It has to be a place where you can reflect on your life. When one arrives home, there's a very tranquil feeling. This project is about that." He compared the design process to his experience boxing professionally as a teenager, staying a step ahead. "Architecture is also a battle," he said. "I wanted to make something which no one else could," Ando continued. "A very quiet piece of architecture." Specifically, he sought to bring a distinct Japanese sensibility to the project while not losing its unique sense of place in the city. "Here is where you most feel, 'I'm living in New York,'" he said. In his design, he said water and light become "a living thing." Watch the video for yourself above and view more renderings here. Developers also plan another 400-foot-tall tower in Midtown by famed Portuguese architect Álvaro Siza Vieira.
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Ride Chicago’s new elevated park and bike path, The 606, with this time-lapse video

Chicago's long-awaited bikeway and elevated park, The 606, opened last weekend (on 6/6, no less) to a rush of pedestrians and cyclists who were eager to test out the new 2.7-mile trail after years of planning, design and construction. The public park remains extremely popular in the sunny week following its debut. https://vimeo.com/130217662 Formerly called the Bloomingdale Trail, the former railroad has been likened to New York City's High Line, but it is quite different—the 606 is as much a highway for bikes as anything else, due in part to its having been largely funded through the U.S. Department of Transportation's Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) improvement program. For those who haven't had a chance to visit the trail, Steven Vance of Streetsblog snapped this time-lapse video of a recent bike ride that covers the length of the trail, which runs through the West Side neighborhoods of Humboldt Park, Logan Square, Wicker Park, and West Town. (Vance is also a contributor to AN.) https://instagram.com/p/3tlNEuERTh/ Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates led the design of the trail, which slopes slightly at various points throughout its length to slow bike traffic and suggest spaces for community events. Several access points connect the elevated trail to parks and city streets below. Meanwhile with The 606 up and running, affordable housing advocates are worried the popular park could help swell the tide of gentrification sweeping out longtime neighborhood residents. https://instagram.com/p/3t4zaOCP0J/
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A long-abandoned New York City aqueduct reopens as bike and pedestrian path

After 45 years, New York City’s oldest standing bridge has been returned to its former glory. On Tuesday, city officials and local advocates cut the ribbon on the newly-revitalized, High Bridge, which stretches 1,450 feet across the Harlem River, from Upper Manhattan to the Bronx. The Romanesque structure dates back to 1848 when it was part of the Old Croton Aqueduct that delivered fresh drinking water into a growing city that was struggling to produce its own. After decades of decay, followed by years of rehabilitation, High Bridge is open once again, offering an inter-borough connection for pedestrians and cyclists. https://vimeo.com/18642808 According to PBS, five of High Bridge’s masonry arches were removed in the 1920s and replaced with one steel arch to better accommodate passing ships. Later, in the late 1950s, when the Croton Aqueduct was decommissioned, High Bridge became a strictly pedestrian path. And it stayed that way until the 1970s, when it was closed to the public and left to deteriorate for decades. After years of prodding from community groups, and a full-page New York Daily News editorial, Mayor Michael Bloomberg committed $50 million toward the restoration of the bridge. In 2006, the New York City Department of Parks & Recreation announced that the project would, in fact, happen, but construction did not start until 2013. On the day of the official groundbreaking, AN reported that, along with necessary structural work, the High Bridge project included "pedestrian safety measures like accessibility ramps, viewing platforms, and new lighting. An eight-foot-tall cable mesh fence to prevent jumpers and throwing trash will also line each side.” The project was supposed to be completed in 2014, but things obviously did not pan out that way. But that's all water under the bridge, if you will, because the High Bridge is back and open for business. “After years of dedicated effort, the High Bridge now offers a very real connection between neighbors, boroughs, and crucial resources," New York City Parks Commissioner Mitchell Silver said in a statement. "Starting today, the people of the Bronx and Manhattan—and indeed all New Yorkers—have will once again be able to walk, bike, or simply sit and enjoy this beautiful bridge." The total cost of the project was just shy of $62 million. https://vimeo.com/130252478