Posts tagged with "Videos":

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100 Fountains will revive New York City’s esteemed public drinking culture

Water, water, everywhere, Nor any drop to drink. —Samuel Taylor Coleridge, The Rime of the Ancient Mariner

Though New York has the some of the cleanest municipal tap water, New Yorkers now consume 1.25 billion bottles of water annually. A contributing factor to the rise in bottled water consumption is the decline in the number of public drinking fountains. New York–based Pilot Projects would like to revive the grand tradition of public bubblers through a novel design/build competition. Pilot Project's 100 Fountains competition, launched September of this year, will tap artists and designers to build 100 fountains citywide in 2016. Each participant receives $5,000 to develop his or her team's design. According to the project proposal, the competition area will be divided into 30–40 zones, with two or three fountains per zone. The public judging period starts June 2016 and runs through September 2016. The original fountains will be auctioned off for charity, and ten designs from the pool will be chosen and duplicated for permanent installation at to-be-determined locations citywide. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZFq8z96zbQQ In 2012, Pilot Projects hosted a campaign to raise awareness around the lack of drinking fountains. In the video above, passerbys in Union Square traipse over a red carpet to a (pre-existing, functioning) fountain operated by white-gloved servers. Per a 2007 zoning text amendment, the Department of City Planning (DCP) requires a fountain in every newly-built Privately Owned Public Space (POPS). The report suggests that, in lieu of vending machines offering sweetened beverages and bottled water, designers should incorporate public drinking fountains into the POPS. To justify their economic reason-for-being, 100 Fountains points to large-scale public art installations that overtook city streets in the late 1990s and 2000s: Christo and Jeanne-Claude's The Gates, Olafur Eliasson's New York City Waterfalls, and CowParade. The economic impacts of these project were estimated in the tens to hundreds of millions of dollars. 100 Fountains also takes direct inspiration from the Minneapolis Arts Commission. The commission highlighted Minneapolis' connection to surrounding rivers and lakes by installing ten custom fountains to celebrate the city's 150th anniversary. Pilot Projects will partner with the NYC Department of Cultural Affairs, the Department of Education, Office of the Arts and Special Projects, as well as Yale University’s Environmental Protection Clinic and Parsons The New School For Design to carry out the project. Expect to see fountains on the streets beginning June of next year.  
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Digital artist Miguel Chevalier syncs science and spirituality at King’s College Chapel, Cambridge

Paris-based digital projection artist Miguel Chevalier turned the University of Cambridge’s 16th century King’s College Chapel into an intellectual hypnosis chamber during the recent Dear World… Yours, Cambridge charity event. As each speaker presented, Chevalier illustrated their points with projected lights designed specifically to the chapel’s interior. For example, when hearing of Stephen Hawking’s research on black holes, the chapel became a sea of constellations. Professor Hawking told the invited audience, "When I arrived in Cambridge I was lucky. I was lucky to meet the brilliant minds that broadened my horizons. I was lucky to be given the space to think, and I chose to think about space." Chevalier is the first artist invited to make a spectacle in the 500 year old Perpendicular Gothic chapel. And his projections accompanied speeches of  renowned professors and alumni. According to Chevalier, the Cambridge project "imagines a number of different graphic universes, which are generated in real time and use their own ‘digital’ language to illustrate and interpret a wide variety of subjects including academic excellence, health, Africa, biology, neurosciences, physics, and biotechnologies." Previously, Chevalier created displays for the 1992 Olympic Games in Barcelona and Paris' Grand Palais.
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Eavesdrop> Everyone’s a winner? Mitchell Joachim and Michael Sorkin square off with rival anti-Guggenheim competitions

What is it about architect Mitchell Joachim that he cannot let go of his Oedipal desire to go after his former "father" employer Michael Sorkin? Not happy about the direction of Sorkin’s non-profit Terreform, Joachim went out and founded his own 501c3, Terreform ONE. Most recently, Sorkin co-organized and sponsored The Next Helsink—with Checkpoint Helsinki, Terreform, Occupy Museums, and Global Ultra Luxury Faction (G.U.L.F.)—a protest “call for ideas” to the high profile Guggenheim Helsinki Design Competition. This alternative competition received hundreds of entries and allowed multiple voices to critique the official Guggenheim one. With Sorkin’s project about to publish a book of its entries, Joachim has now posted online a page of his own where he declares Terreform One the winner of “The New Official Alternative Award Winners of the Guggenheim Helsinki architecture and urban design counter-competition.” It is hard to tell how Mr. Joachim wants us to take the competition. His "winning" design features a bare rear-end with windows. Also, the “competition” seems not have had jurors and or even a call to submit. He claims it was co-sponsored by Anonymous Finland, the Libertarian Anti-Ellsworth Toohey League, Occupy Helsinki, and Eco-communalism. This anti-anti-competition seems to believe it is showing up Next Helsinki, but who can save Sorkin from Joachim? Politico doesn't seem to mind all the fuss, however. The online magazine recently profiled Joachim in the video below.
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Aarhus Bling: James Turrell working with Schmidt Hammer Lassen to design ARoS Art Museum Expansion

While the world has been discussing how much Drake’s “Hotline Bling” music video borrowed from James Turrell’s installations (Hint: a lot*), ARoS Aarhus Art Museum in Denmark announced that the artist is collaborating with Danish architecture firm Schmidt Hammer Lassen on the museum’s new expansion. “The Next Level” expansion project will contain a 12,900-square-foot subterranean gallery and two semi-subterranean art installations, The Sphere and The Dome. Intended to “bring the museum into the elite world of modern art museums,” the extension will cost an estimated $32 million. Schmidt Hammer Lassen originally designed the space in the early 2003 and is working with the museum and the artist to retain the building’s original integrity so the expansion will feel seamless and natural. The firm also worked with Olafur Eliasson on Your Rainbow Panorama, which opened last year. “The Next Level project will develop the museum horizontally in contrast to the existing vertical movement and it is exciting to work with the great lines spanning from the river to the square of the Aarhus Music Hall. Our studio is not just designing a new room for a new artwork, we are co-creating the space and the installation simultaneously with James Turrell,” Morten Schmidt, founding partner at Schmidt Hammer Lassen said in a press release. It seems that Turrell is having quite the week. In addition to the AroS expansion, it was also reported that Yvette Lee of the Guggenheim and Whitney Museum will be the new director of the Roden Crater in Arizona (The crater’s completion date has still not been released.) Responding to Drake's video set*, Turrell had a few select words. "While I am truly flattered to learn that Drake f*cks with me," wrote Turrell in a statement from his lawyer via Vice, "I nevertheless wish to make clear that neither I nor any of my woes was involved in any way in the making of the ‘Hotline Bling' video." If you want to decide for yourself, we recommend watching the music video below and then glancing at a few installations. (If you want to go further down the bizarre rabbit hole, AN has also previously reported rumors from CityLab that “Hotline Bling” is about poor city planning.) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uxpDa-c-4Mc
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It’s the Great Pumpkin, Peoria! A 25-foot-diameter pumpkin balloon rolls through Arizona town

Yesterday, Peoria, Arizona, was attacked by an unlikely foe: a 25-foot-diameter, 350-pound jack o’ lantern balloon. The inflatable pumpkin “escaped” from a Halloween display in the Peoria Sports Complex and proceeded to bounce and roll through the town, including multiple traffic lanes and a neighborhood park, where it eventually got stuck. Officials say that the pumpkin got loose due to strong winds in the area. (Personally, we at AN think it was a copycat performance inspired by the runaway RedBall in Toledo, Ohio). No one was injured, although it did cause street damage at 83rd and Grand Avenues.
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Analysis shows rapper (and urban planning enthusiast?), Drake, loves cities, is really sad about suburban sprawl

Brentin Mock at CityLab has produced an absolutely insane and brilliant interpretation of Drake's 2015 single, "Hotline Bling." It turns out, according to Mock, that Drake is not signaling an appreciation for James Turrell, nor is he sad about an ex-girlfriend. Instead, Mock's line-by-line exegesis reveals that Drake is "sad about poor city planning." Mock suggests that Drake is in anguish because the song's subject, "Kid Suburb," left Baltimore for the suburbs, and her new environment has changed her for the worse. The analysis uses demographic data, cell service maps, commuter tax credits, urban history, and neighborhood rezoning policy to support his conclusion. For instance, take this excerpt from "Hotline Bling" and Mock's interpretation:
Ever since I left the city, you/ You got exactly what you asked for/ Running out of pages in your passport.
"When Kid Suburb [the ostensible subject of the song] lived in the city, it couldn’t get a federal grant to save its life," Mock wrote. "Since she left, the city has received 18 Neighborhood Stabilization Program grants totaling roughly $1.8 million, another $5 million in Community Development Block Grants, and about $20 billion in federal low-income housing tax credits worth of funding. (Her county’s council just passed a resolution banning any of those tax credits from being used in any of its jurisdictions, but that’s another story)." Just, wow.
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The Metamorphosis: Marc Fornes breaks ground on a parametric amphitheater in Maryland

On September 12, New York–based practice Marc Fornes/Theverymany broke ground on its largest project to date, the Chrysalis Amphitheater project. The parametric structure's fluid form is intended to define a public space and live performance venue for outdoor gigs and shows. https://www.youtube.com/watch?t=3&v=cAphf_W4kYE With its classic Marc Fornes aesthetic of scale-like parts forming a larger mass, the transitional space has a form resembling a Taxodium distichum (the Swamp Cypress tree commonly grows in eastern U.S. marshland). The enormous roots create a multifunctional space with the back of the stage being available for children's performances and other openings facilitating the loading and unloading of goods for the performances. Located in Meriwether Park, Columbia, MD, the project currently has a budget of $3.1 million and is set for completion in 2016. The scheme's versatility is aided by the use of various arched openings and a grand proscenium framing the stage. Inside its scaly skin, a system of lightweight aluminum supports, itself with an organic organizational system, holds up the amphitheater shell. The undulating curves and pleated forms contribute to the structural integrity of the design, allowing it to support a substantial light rig above the stage which will serve the performance spaces. While the scheme almost feels like a temporary installation, like many of the designer's projects before, the Chrysalis is embedded firmly into a concrete foundation. Outside of events and concerts, the structure can be used as a shelter from rain and provide shading during the summer. When the stage is not in use, the space's wooden decking is easily adaptable as a destination for social gatherings and public interaction. Seating arrangements and the layout of the arches frame views across the city, creating a calm environment that dramatically contrasts to its alter-ego as a gig venue. Marc Fornes/Theveryman said that Chrysalis' distinct shape is achieved via mesh inflation, a form-finding process. As can be seen in the video below, the structure is almost stretched from its anchoring base points on the ground which are also the nodes of the arches, thus allowing it to look as if some parts are billowing in the wind. These anchor points are also carefully spaced around the trees in the immediate vicinity, which appears to give its woody surroundings a mark of respect. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oSRAKL9laH8 Finally, the complex structure has been colored in hues of bright green as a reaction to its setting in the park. The luminosity and brightness of these tones however, separate it from its natural environment, allowing it to stand out notifying passers by of its presence.
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Landscape architect Nicholas Quennell shares life-work insights in video

The Cultural Landscape Foundation just released the latest installment in their Pioneers Oral History series with a 64-minute interview-style documentary with landscape architect Nicholas Quennell. https://youtu.be/5oFxzw1DfbA?list=PL6K1HBuaqHQRI5ZKCzqxgQ5qQZlbBpcyZ Quennell recalls his evolution as a landscape architect, from his beginnings as an architect working with Lawrence Halprin and creating the now-iconic Ghiradelli Square in San Francisco, to establishing his firm, Quennell Rothschild & Partners in New York in 1968. Although best known for his projects such as the Central Park Children’s Zoo, Fort Tryon Park, Lighthouse Park, East River 60th Street Pavilion, and Museum Park at the North Carolina Museum of Art, Quennell also had a brief stint as a pop artist, taught at Columbia University, and served as president of the New York City Art Commission, among other colorful experiences, such as living in the Chelsea Hotel in the 1960s. Drawing from his over 50 years of experience in the field, Quennell offers valuable insights not only on the past several decades of landscape architecture, but also the future of where it is headed. The 64-minute video is divided into one to two-minute segments which can be watched here.
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Bjarke Ingels receives LafargeHolcim Global Bronze Prize for his work to make a more resilient Manhattan

The LafargeHolcim Foundation for Sustainable Construction has recognized New York City's commitment to progressive and resilient solutions by awarding Danish architect Bjarke Ingels of his eponymous firm BIG the Global Bronze Prize. AN was on hand as Ingels and company accepted the award. https://vimeo.com/117303273 Having been extensively covered by AN,  it has become common knowledge that BIG’s  plan to wrap Lower Manhattan in a landscape berm, known as "The BIG U" keeping floodwaters at bay has been accoladed left, right, and center. As a response to the Rebuild By Design competition organized by the federal Department of Housing & Urban Development (HUD), BIG's winning scheme called for a piece of what Ingels called "resiliency infrastructure" to give the project a strong social context. The Rebuild competition offered incentives to develop urban protection strategies in post–Hurricane Sandy world. Ingels touched on this at the ceremony when he talked about questions the BIG team asked themselves when developing the project. "Could we imagine a way that this resilience infrastructure wouldn't create a see wall that would segregate the life of the city from the water around it?" Ingels asked the crowd. Speaking about when Sandy hit in 2012, Ingels recalled: "Even my office was without power for two weeks, and we were the lucky ones!" The scheme has also been dubbed The Dry Line, referencing the High Line linear park in Manhattan's Chelsea neighborhood. "Maybe we can learn from the High Line...which has become one of the most popular promenades in the city," Ingels said. He noted that in the case of the High Line, the infrastructure itself had been decommissioned and has since manifested its way into city life. "What if [we] don't have to wait for the infrastructure to be decommissioned?" He continued. "What if we can design the resiliency infrastructure of Manhattan so it comes with intended social and environmental side effects that are positive?" Ingels has attempted to answer these questions in his scheme for Lower Manhattan. Despite being in the process of realization, the project will take a lot of extensive collaboration and planning to be a success. If realized, here's what we can expect life on the Dry Line to be like: https://vimeo.com/90759287
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Video> Douglas Durst on affordable housing, sustainability and developing New York City

This Fall, I served as special media correspondent for the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat‘s awards ceremony in Chicago. Among the many architects, engineers and other tall building types I interviewed was Douglas Durst, head of The Durst Organization, a family-run real estate empire established in New York City 100 years ago. He was there to accept the Lynn S. Beedle Lifetime Achievement Award. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qAlxwBgzAio We talked about developers' role in promoting affordable housing, neighborhood development and sustainability. “When people build these high-income, expensive buildings, they should be forced to contribute also to low-income construction, which will bring down the cost of land and make it possible to do rental housing,” said Durst, noting that developers of condominiums are currently exempt from New York's “80/20” housing program. Watch the full video interview embedded from YouTube on this page, or on CTBUH’s website, where you can find the rest of the videos in the series.
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Watch giant sushi float down a Japanese river in Osaka

The installation known as Rolling Sushi and part of the Osaka Canvas Project arts festival involves five oversized pieces of sushi floating down a local waterway as if it were the conveyor belt at a local restaurant. All aboard the sushi train? https://youtu.be/H7n7JnsOEc4 In fact, despite being water-based, that's what it’s being dubbed. It is of course, “the world’s first giant floating sushi train,” according to Rocket News 24. The installation went on last week, as they floated the idea to Osaka's residents. Osaka, incidentally, is Japan's supposed culinary hub, so it's unlikely the idea will go under the radar. The official runs are on the 4th, 5th, and 17th October. https://instagram.com/p/7Z6fUmwggz/
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Eavesdrop> Less Is More: Here’s why Philippe Starck refuses to wear underwear

Philippe Starck, the famed architect and designer, has let the world know that he incorporates the architectural adage of “less is more” into his everyday sartorial decisions. In a video interview with Nowness, Starck said, “I don’t wear underwear because I don’t need it.” https://vimeo.com/132328736 He called underwear one of the “hugest lies” he knows because it is ultimately an attempt to pretend that human beings are not animals who do animal things. He also criticized the societal norms that make it acceptable to walk down the street in a bathing suit but not underwear. “It is astonishing,” he said.