Posts tagged with "Urban Development":

AERIAL FUTURES: Newburgh Enclosures

Imagining New York Stewart International Airport as a catalyst for urban regeneration Event details: Atlas Studios, 11 Spring St, Newburgh, NY 12550 May 17th, 2019, 5:00 - 7:00 PM Speakers: 
  • Alexandra Church, Newburgh City Planning
  • Brandt Knapp, PennDesign
  • Ed Harrison, New York Stewart International Airport
Moderator: Andrés Ramirez, AERIAL FUTURES Situated 60 miles north of Manhattan, the once-grand and historic city of Newburgh has suffered the effects of economic stagnation, intergenerational poverty and post-industrial decline. However, Newburgh is beginning to rise once again. One of the most promising drivers for Newburgh’s economic development is its airport. After opening a few international flights in 2017, the airport began attracting unprecedented attention, passengers and new business. In 2018, the Port Authority of New York & New Jersey rebranded SWF as New York Stewart International Airport, positioning it as New York’s Budget Flight Hub. AERIAL FUTURES: Newburgh Enclosures examines New York Stewart International Airport (SWF) as a catalyst for development in Newburgh and its neighboring region. This public event will reflect on the outcomes and insights gained from a think tank taking place earlier in the day. Bringing together experts and industry professionals, the think tank asks how the airport is likely to impact Newburgh’s economy, agriculture, mobility, and civic life. How can the airport boost local tourism and transportation? What kind of jobs will have a positive impact on the local economy? How can the airport become more than just a travel hub? In conjunction with AERIAL FUTURES: Newburgh Enclosures, architecture graduate students from the University of Pennsylvania have contributed research and design propositions for a site close to the airport that is a current regional bus station - the Shortline Transportation Center.  The student projects add various programming from co-working, to food justice headquarters, to farming making the transportation center a food and leisure hub. The projects are varied, but they all see the site as a connector between the rural and the urban (as well as the global); making a gateway to the New York’s Hudson Valley. These projects will be exhibited during the public event. The event is FREE Please REGISTER https://www.eventbrite.com/e/aerial-futures-newburgh-enclosures-tickets-61508032180 ABOUT AERIAL FUTURES AERIAL FUTURES is a non-profit organization committed to interdisciplinary discourse on aerial infrastructure and its interdependencies. As a cultural platform and expert network, we curate salons, think tanks and public programs that provoke timely considerations of our aerial age to imagine the future of a connected multimodal world.  The AERIAL FUTURES agenda fosters leadership and disruptive thinking in an industry that is overwhelmingly technical and transactional. Beyond aviation, our program explores the interfaces of design, technology, policy, social sciences and the extended urban ecosystem that airports are part of. AERIAL FUTURES: Newburgh Enclosures is in partnership with Department of Small Interventions; PennDesign (The University of Pennsylvania School of Design); The Port Authority of NY & NJ; New York Stewart International Airport; and the Workforce Development Institute
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Portland approves a twenty year growth plan

Last Wednesday, the Portland City Council adopted a new growth plan that will span the next two decades, according to Oregon Live. The 2035 Comprehensive Plan is an extension of Portland’s 1980 Comprehensive Plan; it also builds upon the 2012 Portland Plan and the 2015 Climate Action Plan. Additionally, it follows the approval of the West Quadrant Plan, a long-term upzoning plan aimed at increasing Portland's downtown density. The Plan notes that Portland is expected to experience a population increase of 42 percent (260,000 residents) in the next twenty years. To address this, the plan will address five major elements: the development of city centers, the creation of jobs, the protection of public health and safety, changes to some residential densities, and updates to open space designations for neighborhood development. Rule changes would densify single-family neighborhoods and require the inclusion of affordable housing units in housing projects. The plan reveals a proposed $80 million extension of the Portland Streetcar to the John’s Landing neighborhood. The city would also make seismic improvements to Willamette River bridges and upgrade infrastructure for pedestrian and bicycle travel across the city, the article notes. The plan will allow increased building heights downtown, allowing for the construction and development of office buildings to accommodate an estimated increase of 140,000 workers in the city. Such large-scale developments have already been proposed: for example, the Goodman family’s Downtown Development Group has suggested an eleven high-rise project for Downtown Portland. Investment in brownfield remediation throughout Portland is another goal of the legislation, according to the article. The 2035 Comprehensive Plan is scheduled to take effect in January 2018.
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With Limited Land for Housing, Hong Kong Looks to Grow Underground

The housing problem in Hong Kong is critical. Studies estimate that the city of seven million will have to house another 600,000 people over the course of the next 30 years. With rapidly increasing urbanization rates, leading Chinese metropolises are speculating on fast and intelligent ways to manage population growth by creating additional housing within their existing borders. While some cities are growing taller and others are mulling developing rare and cherished park space, Hong Kong is taking a different approach. Officials and engineers have thought about something else: developing an extensive underground city. The plan calls for building a cross-harbor pedestrian corridor equipped with residences, shops, retail outlets, sports, and entertainment facilities located under Victoria Harbor. As the government is searching for any and all options that could create space for housing, it has already identified fifteen urban areas that could be used for underground development by the end of 2015. In their 2009-2010 Policy Agenda, the city’s Development Bureau released a new initiative to launch strategic plans to develop Hong Kong’s underground space in a sustainable way. The study, entitled Enhanced Use of Underground Space in Hong Kongexplores different techniques that would employ the city’s underground territory for additional housing and long term demographic and economic enhancement. Despite the ambitious nature of the plan, there remains many drawbacks and obstacles preventing its implementation. Experts argue that the development of Hong Kong's underground would be extremely costly, and much more so than surface projects as the costs of construction would be higher. Moreover, the laying out of such plans is extremely lengthy, and the need for housing in the city is pressing. Therefore, potentials of underground space development might not be the immediate answer to an urgent problem.   Still, others continue to push for bulldozing green space in favor of more development. Gordon Wu, chairman developer of Hopewell Holdings Ltd and Vice President of the Real East Developer’s Association, labels people’s attachment to city-parks as “stupid” and not something that Hong Kong should pride itself on. In line with Wu's statement, many city officials find parks to be extremely problematic as over 230,000 residents are on a waiting list for public housing. Another option being explored would be to take over the sea and to create man-made islands which would be in close proximity to the city's center and financial district. The Development Bureau estimates a need to extend the city's built environment by up to ten square miles in order to accommodate residential, commercial, and industrial facilities. This proposal remains opposed by residents who argue that such construction would have a negative impact on the value of water-front apartments, and would hinder the view of the city's famous and breathe-taking panorama. Environmental activists also object to the proposal as they are concerned with the safety and well being of dolphins and other marine animals.