Posts tagged with "upholstery":

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Product> Pretty in Pink

When it comes to interiors, pink has grown from a trendy accent color to one of the most popular hues. There has been a large focus on bold geometric prints, adapted from textile motifs such as powdery roses and in-your-face coral window coverings. Sahara Aelfie

All of designer Aelfie Oudghiri’s products are handwoven on traditional dhurrie floor looms in India. Berber textiles, Islamic geometry, and North African ceramics melded with the youth culture and fashion of the moment inspire her modern designs.

Cross Cut Danskina

A luxurious wool and viscose material composes this graphic grid rug that evolves into an organic pattern at its end. The cutouts allow the floor to be visible, creating a stark contrast. Cross Cut is available in nine color options to suit any decor.

Roller Blinds Kvadrat

Paris-based brothers Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec have designed Kvadrat’s brand-new line of top-quality aluminum blinds that control light as well as glare and temperature. The system utilizes a patented fixing mechanism that hides all screws and hinges. The blinds are available in chain, switch, and remote-control-operated versions.

SILAÏ Charlotte Lancelot for GAN

The newest collection from Belgian designer Charlotte Lancelot for Gandia Blasco’s indoor brand, GAN, is motivated by the work of craftsmen. Woven over a plastic grid, four different stitches create a combination of detailed patterns.

Bright Angle Scholten & Baijings

Suitable for commercial and residential upholstering, this 40 percent cotton, 33 percent polyester, and 27 percent nylon blend is also available in custom antimicrobial stain-resistant finishes with impermeable backing. This print is by Amsterdam-based design studio Scholten & Baijings, which is known for its clean, minimal product designs.

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Product> Grethe Sørensen for Wolf-Gordon Textiles and Wallcoverings

This March, Wolf-Gordon will launch a collection of upholstery and wallcoverings featuring the designs of Danish textile designer Grethe Sørensen. The offerings highlight the artist’s ground-breaking technique of translating pixels to threads, most recently displayed in her exhibition Rush Hour/Shanghai 5 at Fuori Salone in Milan. Sørensen’s work often features variations of light and color found in night settings and urban landscapes, which she manipulates in Photoshop before translating on to fabric. Cooper-Hewitt plans to acquire her work once its new building opens in late 2014. Sørensen's line for Wolf-Gordon was created by taking unfocused photographs of urban lights which she then manipulated in photoshop. “It’s more about the colors and the shapes,” she told AN. The collection is Sørensen’s introduction to the U.S. market and is being produced at a Wolf-Gordon partner-mill in North Carolina. Despite it’s name, Millions of Colors is composed of just six weft colors—red, yellow, green, blue, cyan, and magenta—but endless arrangements support broad variations within three colorways. Black and white is also available.  All color options are composed of 94 percent worsted wool and 6 percent nylon. Three patterns were designed for wallcoverings. Soft Spots and Blinds are both digitally developed for vinyl. Codes is a pixelated pattern, available in half a dozen neutral colors. Wolf-Gordon will make HPDs available for Sørensen’s new collection as the company moves toward greater transparency with all its product offerings.
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NeoCon Taken by “Force”

Fabrikator

Wolf-Gordon’s “Force of Nature” spirals through Chicago’s Merchandise Mart during NeoCon 2013.

Based on the success of Wolf-Gordon’s inaugural NeoCon installation in 2012, chief creative officer Marybeth Shaw commissioned yet another show-stopping design piece for 2013. With the working title “Forces of Nature,” she turned once again to New York City–based design studio karlssonwilker and Brooklyn-based design-build collaborative The Guild to create a sculpture that would showcase the breadth of the company’s textiles and wall coverings. “The title ended up being quite appropriate to the final form, as the sculpture is a geometric construct with all of the resulting physical forces that might spin it out of the Mart’s ‘town square,’” Shaw recently told AN. Karlssonwilker initially conceived of a kinetic sculpture, but Shaw wanted a large installation—nearly 30 feet long and 14 feet wide. At that size, there was no room for movement within the given space, a double-height ceiling over an escalator that would carry 42,000 show attendees. “We wanted it to rotate like a rotisserie chicken, but we went for a larger form,” said Graham Kelman, creative manager for The Guild. Ultimately, the team decided on a static sculpture resembling a twisted spine that gives a sense of movement through color and form. “I lost sleep over whether it would fit because if there was flex in the spine, it wouldn’t work.”
  • Fabricators The Guild
  • Designers karlssonwilker, Marybeth Shaw, The Guild
  • Location Chicago
  • Date of Completion June 2013
  • Material wallcovering, textiles, Masonite, foam, aluminum, plywood, paint, screws
  • Process 3DS Max, SketchUp, CNC milling
The designers worked in SketchUp and 3DS Max to develop layered parameters for 68 slats—the vertebrae along the spine—that would showcase 136 of Wolf-Gordon’s products, one on each side. As visitors ascend the escalator, the slats appear above them like a twisting array of fanned-out cards. The products were arranged by color, forming a gradient that goes from white to orange to red on the way up the escalator and purple to brown on the way down. The edge of each slat slopes one degree, adding to the sculpture’s twisting vortex appearance. Since the sculpture hangs above show goers, realizing the piece with light materials was paramount. The slats are made from foam sandwiched between two sheets of Masonite. An aluminum channel along the perimeter of each slat provides rigidity. A plywood box connects and spaces each slat. The team used the software’s parametric capabilities to calculate where to place screw holes in the boxes and slats to create the twisting geometry. The Guild fabricated the 68 slats and plywood boxes in Brooklyn with a CNC mill, flat-packed for transport to Chicago, and installed at the Mart over a period of three days. “In terms of installation, it went well but it was a strange structure with torsional forces acting on it,” Kelman said. “As we built, the twist revealed itself.” Aircraft cable was fastened strategically along the spine, which was ultimately affixed to a 32-foot-long box trough, securely attached to beams of the ceiling. The final result was another eye-catching surprise during NeoCon at the Merchandise Mart. “Lots of things can go wrong with these projects,” said Shaw. “But if you’re on the same page and trust your collaborator’s intentions, you’ll always find your way to a solution.”