Posts tagged with "Unveiled":

Is That A Dhow In Your Pocket, Or Just Zaha Hadid’s Stadium Design For The Qatar World Cup?

Zaha Hadid Architects has unveiled its design for a 40,000-seat soccer stadium to rise in the Arabian kingdom of Qatar. The project is slated to be complete in time for the 2022 FIFA World Cup, and is only one of several such facilities that the oil-rich nation plans to build—in addition to miles of roads, a seaport, airport, and a rail system—in a $140 billion spending spree to lay down the infrastructure necessary to support the event and the international crowds it attracts. Hadid's office has stated that the design of the stadium is derived from the dhow, a type of fishing vessel that is common among the peoples of the Arabian Peninsula. Several commentators have pointed out, however, that the renderings more closely resemble the mounds, folds, and cavities of a certain very private part of the female anatomy. Since the World Cup is played during the summertime, one of the chief challenges of the design will be keeping the interior environment cool enough for comfortable spectating. Ambient temperatures in Qatar can reach as high as 120 degrees fahrenheit. According to Hadid's office, which is working on the project with AECOM, the shape of the roof—which will be a composite structure of steel and engineered timber—has been specifically designed to encourage passive cooling. This combined with mechanical air conditioning systems will keep the interior temperature at around 85 degrees fahrenheit. Hadid's feminine formed stadium falls among an illustrious company of other buildings that have attempted to counterbalance the predominantly male derived motifs of architecture. (Didn't someone once point out the phallic nature of the skyscraper?) Oddly enough, as with Hadid and her dhow diversionary tactics, few designers actually advertise that their lady like buildings are inspired by this impulse, and most commentators commend them for other reasons. The clearly feminine crown of A. Epstein & Sons' 1983 Smurfit-Stone Building in Chicago was also allegedly designed to reference sail boats, these in Lake Michigan, rather than a vagina. And Philip Johnson's award-winning 1975 Penzoil Place in Houston was lauded for helping architects to break away from the rectangular modernist box, rather than applauded for looking like a girl lying on her back with her knees in the air. While the profession of architecture roils with calls for more recognition of women's roles in great buildings, can't it also come a little cleaner about when it uses the feminine form as inspiration?

Unveiled> Renzo Piano’s Stacked Masses Create an Efficient Paris Judicial Complex

Renzo Piano has unveiled renderings for the new Palais de Justice, positioned on the northern edge of central Paris in the urban expansion area of Clichy-Batignolles, which will provide space for and unite numerous judicial services presently scattered throughout the city. The law courts complex appears as a slender, translucent, 525-foot-tall tower comprised of four stacked rectangular masses diminishing in size as they ascend. The structure includes extensive fenestration to blend the division of the interior and exterior, in addition to two exterior glass elevators offering expansive views of the city. Three atria at the 64,600 square foot ground level piazza direct views into the towers overhead that encompass 30 floors grouped into three levels, each containing 10 floors. The structure consists of 90 courtrooms, offices, and meeting rooms for the magistrates, public prosecutor, and presiding judges. The floor plans within the three sections decrease in scale, forming a tiered system with space for terraces, which incorporate roof gardens landscaped with trees. The terraces accommodate solar panels and a rainwater collection system, and the building is on track to set a new standard for energy efficiency in tall buildings. Designed for efficiency and simplicity, the thin proportions of the courthouse are systematically organized so as to guarantee plentiful daylight throughout, and even extending to the tower’s center. The site is situated at a major crossroads between the administrative areas of the city and its suburbs, and is well linked by public transportation, including the northern expanse of the exceedingly successful, recently completed tramway system. The Palais de Justice is expected to open by 2017.

Three Finalists Reveal Designs for an Activated Van Alen Institute

New York City's Van Alen Institute (VAI) is turning 120 next year, and to celebrate, the institute is taking its message of inspired architecture and urbanism to the street. The storefront space on West 22nd Street has been home to the institute's popular LOT-EK–designed bookstore and event space, organized around a stack of bleachers made from reclaimed wooden doors painted highlighter yellow. VAI's new director, David van der Leer, is tackling the redesign and expansion of the sidewalk space to maximize the organization's public visibility as it evolves its mission into the 21st century. Three finalists—Collective-LOK, EFGH Architectural Design Studio, and Of Possible Architectures (OPA)—were selected from over 120 respondents to VAI's "Ground/Work" competition earlier this year, and now their schemes have been revealed. EFGH Architectural Design Studio Hayley Eber, Frank Gesualdi, Spencer Lapp, Pat Ruggiero, and Ani Ivanova. Project statement from the Van Alen:
A microcosm of the space of the city, the new Van Alen Institute is imagined as a container for dynamic life. As an institution committed to the expansion of the definition of “public architecture” and the processes that shape the public realm, the VAI needs a home that embodies that ambition. Recognizing the dramatic proportions of the existing site as an opportunity, the proposed new Ground/ Work space turns a long skinny ground floor volume into a virtue: it maximizes the street level space, creating a single room - a large “grand hall” - that strives to reach the scale of the street, and extend the life of 22nd Street into the heart of the Institute. Through the easy manipulation of three mobile components in the space, The Media Wedge, The Bleacher and the Hinge Table, the VAI can be radically transformed by a few employees in a short amount of time.   When one asks “What is the new space of the Van Alen Institute; A Workspace, Exhibition space, Lecture Hall, Book/ Media Outlet, Public Forum, Conference space, Performance Space or Party space?” The only suitable answer is All of the Above.
View more information on the proposal at the Van Alen website. Collective-LOK Jon Lott, William O’Brien Jr., and Michael Kubo Project statement from the Van Alen:
The new institutional home of the Van Alen has to be many things at once. The brief requires curatorial flexibility for a breadth of public programming including exhibitions, lectures, reading groups, and book launches; a comfortable and efficient office environment for different scales and modes of work ranging from formal to casual; a framework that can grow to include the second floor and basement as the institution expands in the future; and a mobile street seat that will bring the Van Alen’s mission into the urban realm. To accommodate this range of scenarios within a limited square footage, we propose a Screen Play: a mechanism to order these spatial, curatorial, and temporal scenarios through a subtle interplay of surfaces that creates a complex and ambiguous presence in the city. The project proposes five strategies of screen play to enable and give shape to the broadest possible range of uses.
View more information on the proposal at the Van Alen website. Of Possible Architectures Vincent Appel, Ethan Lay-Sleeper, Jaime Magaliff, Paul Miller, Heather Murtagh, Franklin Romero Jr., and Emily Ruopp, in collaboration with Jay Atherton. Project statement from the Van Alen:
The VAI has developed a legacy of architectural projects through competitions and commissions. The Van Alen Stairs, inspired by the TKTS Steps, capture this legacy most succinctly. The Stairs achieve an architecture of relational tectonics. We have identified relational tectonics as the dimension of architecture which intentionally provokes relationships between people, their behavior, and their environment...For the next iteration of the Van Alen Institute, we propose a translation of the Van Alen Stair into the Van Alen Table. The dimensions of the Table are precisely calibrated to the VAI's space. The Table allows for the full gradient of programs to easily expand and contract along, around, and in between its 70' length. This table presents those using it — whether reading, lounging, working, etc. — in a way that is both comfortable, natural, and uncanny. The experience is just off-center from typical expectations.
View more information on the proposal at the Van Alen website. The public is invited to weigh in on their favorite designs through September 10, which will be evaluated by a jury later this month. The competition jury includes Stephen Cassell (Architecture Research Office), Winka Dubbeldam (Archi-tectonics), Mark Gardner (Jaklitsch/Gardner Architects), Mark Robbins (International Center of Photography), Ada Tolla (LOT-EK), Marc Tsurumaki (LTL Architects), David van der Leer (Van Alen Institute), and Marc Kushner (Hollwich Kushner). The winning design team will be announced in late September and construction is expected to begin by the end of the year.

Unveiled> SOM Designs Mashreq Bank Tower in Dubai

Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (SOM) announced last week it would design a new headquarters for Dubai-based Mashreq Bank. The 32-story tower is “a quiet sculptural form within Dubai’s skyline,” SOM Design Director Ross Wimer said in a statement. Its L-shaped floor plate is cantilevered around an empty volume between the building’s eight-story podium and its top levels. The building’s massing shields that courtyard from solar gain, while opening up views to Sheikh Zayed Road and the Burj Khalifa to the east. Executive offices occupy the top two floors, where the square floorplate resumes, with Mashreq’s Board Room suspended from an interior opening at the middle.

Unveiled> OMA Master Plan Wins Bogotá’s International Design Competition

OMA has been selected to design the Bogotá Centro Administrativo Nacional (CAN) new civic center, situated at the heart of the city’s main axis, Calle 26. Steered by partner-in-charge Shohei Shigematsu, the 680-acre mixed-use design occupies a footprint as large as Washington, D.C.’s National Mall and will operate as the city’s government headquarters with intermixed residential, educational, retail, and cultural developments, all which encourage continuous activity within separate districts. The design intends to integrate civic and public life while connecting to local destinations. CAN will form a new public axis in Bogotá, unifying green, infrastructural, and programmatic networks. The site is divided into three districts, including an institutional/governmental area that connects to the current cultural and park spaces, an office zone linked to the current financial district, and an educational campus that links to the University City of Bogotá. The multi-use program will be tied together by a green path that extends into Bogotá’s decidedly popular pedestrian and cycling CicloVia system. Shigematsu described the development as one that attains “clear urban density while accommodating programmatic diversity.” The winning design will move Bogotá’s historic downtown center, master-planned between 1947 and 1951 by Le Corbusier. CAN will be the second largest constructed institutional master plan in Latin America, with Oscar Neimeyer’s 1960s Brasilia being the largest. The project will be carried out in partnership with local architect Gomez + Castro, mobility consultant Carlos Moncada, financial consultant Oscar Borerro, and sustainability consultant Esteban Martinez. [beforeafter]oma-masterplan-bogota-archpaper-09 oma-masterplan-bogota-archpaper-10[/beforeafter]

Unveiled> NADAAA Designs An Architecture School for the University of Toronto

The University of Toronto recently revealed ambitious plans for One Spadina Crescent, a historic property with a 19th century Gothic Revival building positioned in the center of a roundabout. By next year, the site will be the University’s John H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design. NADAAA, in collaboration with E.R.A. Architects, will restore the historic building and add a new wing with lecture and studio space, a library and a digital fabrication workshop. The project will supply state-of-the-art accommodations for architecture, art, landscape, and urban design students and professors. One Spadina has lived many lives—it was built as a theological seminary and was later a military hospital for World War I veterans, a factory for penicillin and polio viruses, and an eyeball bank. Now, NADAAA will transform the site into a new home for the University's Daniels Faculty of Architecture. Through a $50-million campaign (of which $24 million remains to be raised), the makeover will involve a contemporary addition to the north side, as well as pavilions and a public hall to engage the community. Plans include removing a fence that encloses the property and restoring pedestrian access. The main east-west corridor will serve as an extension of Russel Street. The addition's exterior will be composed of glass, stone, and steel and will conserve views of the building’s grand turrets. Within the irregularly shaped structure, openings allow natural light to enter the floors and rooms. A considerable amount of interior space, about 100,000 square feet, will receive daylight. The contoured roof will allow for rainwater harvesting. The restoration and addition are planned for completion in 2015.  

Unveiled> Grimshaw to Design New Istanbul Art Museum

Grimshaw Architects has been selected by the Vehbi Koç Foundation to design Koç Contemporary, a new art museum that supports cultural and social life in Istanbul and greater Turkey. Selected from a list of 20 globally renowned submissions, Grimshaw’s winning design calls for a stone-colored mosaic tile facade, a rooftop terrace offering sweeping views of the city, an education area, and an open layout. Located in Istanbul’s Beyoglu area, a region experiencing rapid redevelopment, Koç Contemporary blurs the boundary between inside and outside and includes a materials plan inspired by the mosaic-tiled forms of traditional Ottoman architecture. The firm’s design complements the distinct collection of paper, paintings, video, media installations, performance art and music events through a scheme that incorporates geometric volumes and exotic woods within the galleries. The Museum is expected to open in 2016.

Rafael Viñoly Offers A Glimpse of Proposed 70-Story Tower

Rafael Viñoly Architects has unveiled plans for a new 70-story residential tower located just a small block from the World Trade Center at 22 Thames Street. The developers are looking to replace the 10-story, former American Stock Exchange building with an 870-foot skyscraper. Fisher Brothers, who bought the site for $87.5 million in 2012, asked Rafael Viñoly to design the building and initial plans were presented to members of Community Board 1 last week, where Curbed and the Tribeca Tribune snapped photos of Viñoly's rendering. The glass building would include space for 450 apartments and commercial use on the ground floor. Under the existing zoning, the developers have the right to construct an 85-story tower. However, the company unexpectedly has decided to build a shorter, wider tower better suited for the area. The layout would create space for more spacious apartments and not block the neighboring 1,776-foot One World Trade Center. The skyscraper would act as a transition between the soaring World Trade Center and the low-rise masonry buildings on Greenwich Street. The requested zoning variance would reduce the required setback of the building from 20 feet to 10 or 13 feet, allowing for a wider building. While the number of apartments in the building may change, at least 20 percent will be set aside for affordable housing. The project will integrate environmentally-friendly design and energy efficiency. In the fall, Fisher Brothers will supply a more comprehensive presentation to CB1’s Financial District Committee when it seeks advisory approval for the zoning variance. The city will make the ultimate decision regarding the zoning amendment. A Fisher Brothers representative has revealed a completion goal of September 2017, if all goes as planned.

Unveiled> Gehry Partners’ Renderings for National Art Museum of China Design

Frank Gehry has unveiled renderings of its shortlisted entry for the competition to design the National Art Museum of China (NAMOC), the predestined showstopper of Beijing’s new cultural district. Gehry was shortlisted alongside fellow Pritzker Prize winners Jean Nouvel and Zaha Hadid for the high-profile project. Gehry's submission incorporates transparent cladding, an interior comprised of lofty, geometric courtyards evocative of pagodas and temples, and a layout that would accommodate nearly 12 million annual visitors. [beforeafter] gehry_china_museum_10 gehry_china_museum_08[/beforeafter]   In acknowledging the globalization of art and its role in connecting the world’s various cultures, the firm's plans seeks to address the concept of 21st century Chinese architecture. Gehry Partners has created a unique design tailored to the museum’s framework, as the structure will be situated facing the central axis of Olympic Park, over the course of the three competition stages. To convey delicate movement, the firm considered glass as a facade material, and in doing so developed a new material—translucent stone—that grants the building an imperial appearance suitable for a national museum. The translucent stone, which is part of the inventive sustainable facade system that integrates a ventilated airspace, allows the structure to efficiently transform for the seasons, festivals, diverse exhibitions, and as a canvas for artists. The renderings reveal four dispersed entrances at each corner and expose a structure that can accommodate a record number of visitors. A formal entry resembling a Chinese temple is positioned in the center of the west facade. The interiors are organized around large public spaces linked vertically by escalators. Visible only from the inside, the spaces are inspired by temples and establish a proper connection between the shapes of the building facade and the interior. The project is currently part of Los Angeles' Museum of Contemporary Art exhibition called A New Sculpturalism: Contemporary Architecture from Southern California.

Zaha Hadid unveils new details about her curvy Miami skyscraper

Miami's development scene has been heating up in the past year with starchitects lining up for a chance to build in the Magic CityZaha Hadid has been equally as hot with several irons in the fire since the last series of renderings for her first U.S. skyscraper, the residential One Thousand Museum tower on the city's waterfront, were unveiled in April. Along with designing a stadium for the 2022 World Cup and the New National Stadium in Japan, she managed to find time to make plans for the already dramatic tower even more extraordinary. New details have recently surfaced on the project's website about the fanciful sculptural structure, detailing the building's sky lounge, aquatic center, and curvy-furniture-stocked lobby, not to mention Miami’s first private helipad placed on a residential complex. Based on earlier renderings, we already knew about many of the building's ultra-luxe amenities, but these newly refined views offer a more refined glimpse of the impressive Aquatic Center and Sky Lounge situated more than 600 feet above the sidewalk on the tower's 60th and 61st floors. Envisaged as a luxurious retreat hovering above the urban environment, the double height space presents stunning panoramic views over Biscayne Bay, the Atlantic Ocean, and the Miami skyline. Sculptural domed walls evocative of water drops and a double-height glass facade encloses the infinity-edge indoor pool. By day the space is bathed with natural light and by night is immersed in the city’s glow refracting off its sculptural form. The new renderings reveal folded glass components at each corner on the top levels that appear as delicately cut jewels. At the tower’s ground level within the podium-like pedestal, the porte-cochère offers privacy from the city streets and a distinguished arrival in line with the cachet of One Thousand Museum. A multi-level wellness and spa center sits atop the porte-cochère and looks over recreational pools and a terrace space pierced by the tower’s curved exoskeleton beams. Construction is set to begin in 2014. All renderings courtesy One Thousand Museum.

Unveiled> A Grimshaw-Designed Garden Vision for Wimbledon

The All England Club has unveiled its Grimshaw-designed Wimbledon Master Plan, which establishes a vision for the future of the site and a structure to direct the ongoing development and improvement of the Club. The Master Plan draws on existing assets and reflects the history of The Championships while resolving certain challenges that the site presents. Three new grass courts will be repositioned to ease overcrowding, No. 1 Court will be reworked and a fresh landscape scheme will enhance and define public areas. Key objectives include reinforcing Wimbledon as a world-class sporting venue of national and international significance, conserving the site’s exclusive legacy and guaranteeing that all new building is of first-class quality. To accomplish this, the Master Plan resolves chief operational concerns and develops effective transport solutions. Plans for the site incorporate a reduced-height Indoor Courts Building within an improved landscaped setting. The courts will sit atop basement areas for courtesy car operation, clay courts will be repositioned and a tunnel will ensure discreet access to the new building. A fixed and retractable roof is on the agenda for No. 1 Court, which will allow for continuous play, rain or shine. As for No. 2 and 3 Courts, each will offer more space for unreserved seating and access between the improved grass courts will be widened. Revamped landscaping will bolster the tree-lined boulevard leading to a new entrance plaza. The Master Plan calls for an additional plaza to the south and a press lawn. The southern entrance will also be extended. A new restaurant and public concessions will accompany a sustainable green roof. The plan aims to decrease carbon emissions from the grounds. The Master Plan emphasizes the ‘Tennis in an English Garden’ theme through a series of unique areas set within a cohesive landscape framework.

Plans Unveiled for Foster + Partners-designed Einstein Museum

Foster + Partners has released concept renderings for the proposed Albert Einstein Museum in Jerusalem. Part of Hebrew University’s Mount Scopus Campus, the museum will serve as a motivational learning center that reflects Einstein’s scientific and cultural impact on the world. The design concept is open and airy and emphasizes light at every bend, including an amphitheater covered in mirrors to illuminate the space. The idea behind the Museum is to “shine a light” on Einstein’s accomplishments. Foster's design accentuates light through the use of a spherical volume at the core of the structure that functions as an amphitheater. The gallery incorporates gyroscopic mirrors that rotate and bounce sunlight onto a dark screen, which creates shows to produce the effect of a star shining above the building. The mirrored surfaces form a canopy over the exhibition courtyard. Other techniques brighten the exhibition spaces inside the Museum. Einstein’s various scientific theories are luminously showcased throughout the design. The structure’s skeleton is composed of profiled stone ribs that expose the image of the German-born scientist’s face when viewed from particular angles. A model of the design is on display at London's Royal Academy Summer Exhibition this year. The project is expected to begin construction in 2015 with completion scheduled for 2017.