Posts tagged with "Tsao & McKown":

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2017 Best of Design Awards for Residential – Single-Unit

2017 Best of Design Award for Residential – Single-Unit: Michigan Lake House Architect: Desai Chia Architecture with Environment Architects Location: Leelanau County, Michigan Perched on a woodland bluff overlooking Lake Michigan, this home is an assemblage of three offset structures—the “gathering” structure with a 20-foot cantilever-covered “vista” seating terrace, two “sleeping” structures, and a dining area breezeway that connects all three structures. The roofscape has gentle undulations that follow the movement of the natural terrain and make a playful reference to the vernacular architecture of nearby fishing villages. The exterior is finished in shou sugi ban, or Japanese charred wood. The charred texture and the modulation of deep facade members enhance the shadows across the surface as the sun rises and sets. The firm also reclaimed dying ash trees from the site and milled them down to be used as interior finishes and custom furniture throughout the house—a nod to the indigenous landscape.
"That house really upends alot of the expectations one would have when looking at a house. Once inside, these unique details and volumetric gymnastics define the interiors in many interesting ways as well, while maintaining a home-like sense of warmth and scale." – Matt Shaw, Senior Editor, The Architect's Newspaper (juror)
Structural: Apex Engineering & Management Mechanical: Bayshore Engineering Lighting: Christine Sciulli Light + Design Landscape Architect: Surface Design Contractor: Easling Construction Company   Honorable Mention Project: Constant Springs Residence Architect: Alterstudio Architecture Location: Austin, Texas Constant Springs Residence offers the opportunity to live simultaneously in the center of the city and in an isolated refuge. A magnificent live oak passes through the cedar ceiling, and an ipe deck permits the penetration of water. A second opening in the ceiling invites light and rain deep into the house’s core.   Honorable Mention Project: Upstate Teahouse Architect: Tsao & McKown Location: Pound Ridge, New York Upstate Teahouse was inspired by traditional Japanese architecture. It is formed of exposed heavy timber construction, which reduces the need for interior walls and opens the plan. Within the open plan, variations of proportion and light produce subtle rhythmic effects—such as two large, asymmetrical skylights that break up the flat roof.
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On View> OPEN: An Exhibition by Tsao & McKown Architects

OPEN: An Exhibition by Tsao & McKown Architects Slocum Gallery Syracuse University School of Architecture Syracuse, NY Calvin Tsao and Zack McKown aim to provide a critical context to seven projects in their OPEN exhibition, ranging from a lipstick tube to a prototypical community of 25,000 in China. The exhibition provides a theoretical framework with which to view the projects, with the inclusion of historical, cultural, and economic background research in addition to sketches and drawings that demonstrate the design process at work. Realizing the limitations of a gallery—that is, the impossibility of showing actual architecture, as well as a limited space to display information—Tsao and McKown decided to post the exhibition materials online and make the gallery a gathering space for students. In the center of the gallery, a raised platform with sides angled to provide backrest is lined with felt and populated with dozens of throw pillows (graffiti markers included). Films that have influenced Tsao and McKown are projected on a screen that runs along the back of the platform. With wall space freed up the team fill the gallery with images of their lives at work, from moonlighting on Vogue sets to work done before architecture school, allowing students to understand the details that inform and motivate their work.
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City in China Disappears Overnight

Chaohu city in China has been canceled. It wasn’t a small city. In fact the population of more than 4 million is comparable to Los Angeles, the Phoenix metro area, and the whole of South Carolina, but that is now irrelevant data, since Chaohu's official city status was annihilated on August 22. Although buildings and inhabitants remain as proof of a once-coherent city plan and living organism, the land has since been divided into three parts and absorbed by its neighbors, Hefei, Wuhu and Ma'anshan. Situated in eastern China’s Anhui province, about 200 miles west of Shanghai, the idea was to strip the dead wood and make the surrounding cities more competitive, which, unlike the former Chaohu, are rapidly industrializing and urbanizing. In a recent interview for NPR, economics professor Jiang Sanliang from Anhui University explained: "Chaohu's development hasn't been good, but Hefei … needs land, so absorbing Chaohu will benefit Hefei. The government hopes that redistributing the land will improve the entire province's GDP," he says. It turns out, according to this report, Hefei’s average growth of 17 percent was enough of a reason to dissolve an entire city. Though it is an unusual scenario, there are some benefits to the new divisions. For years the city’s namesake, Lake Chaohu, has been undergoing an intensive clean-up effort to meet the countrywide agenda to cleanse its badly polluted lakes. In the new arrangement the lake falls under Hefei’s administration and has more chance of getting the funding it needs to meet the Government’s 2030 deadline. However, there is no doubt that the move is at odds with other city-planning approaches in China; in August we reported on a new kind of utopia in Chengdu. Designed by a New York architect and local developer, it was one that aimed to foster connections and strengthen communities rather than amalgamate and alienate them. Indeed, instead of public consultation and even public announcement many inhabitants of the former Chaohu learnt about its abolishment from local news on the morning it happened; the striking off happened overnight. No ceremony. No funeral. No Chaohu.
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Our Academy Awards

Or so they like to say, when referring to the Cooper Hewitt’s National Design Awards, or more accurately, the Cooper Hewitt, National Design Museum’s National Design Awards.  And that’s exactly what it was like: a little too much of a mouthful of an event. But it was also an undeniably bounteous banquet of everyone Who’s a Who in architecture and design of all stripes. The party was held last night not in the backyard tent as of old, but in the marbled bank hall palace of Cipriani 42nd Street. The stars were all out and too many to name as this year the museum was also celebrating its tenth year anniversary for the awards.  Herding everyone to table was not easy but a hush spread as gala chair Richard Meier passed the podium to Desiree Rogers, the White House social secretary who expounded on our nation’s children and the great role modeling that designers/architects could provide.  Everyone was impressed with themselves as next up was broadcast princess Paula Zahn, the evening’s tirelessly beaming emcee. And for the next three hours great awards were dished out (along with some seriously thick slabs of prime beef) to the very deserving and, among them, our especial friends SHoP Architects (winsomely introduced by Reed Kroloff) who received the Architecture Design Award; Calvin Tsao and Zack McKown (nicely roasted by Rodolfo Machado and Jorge Silvetti who recalled days when the four sculpted the great women’s hairdos of the 20th Century in the Long Island sands) who received the Interior Design Award; Constantin and Laurene Boym who gamely shared the mic just like Julia Roberts and Clive Owens might at the real Academy Awards; and Walter Hood of HOOD Design whose urban landscapes we want to know much more about. As often happens at the Design Awards, the presenters outshone the winners in matters only of sheer star dust: Chuck Close presented the Corporate Award to the Walker Art Center (the first museum ever to get one); John Waters riffed hilariously through the Boym’s disaster building paperweights; actress Eva Longoria had trouble with the teleprompter (everyone else handled their 4x5s or 8x11s adroitly enough) when awarding Francisco Costa of Calvin Klein the Fashion Award; Charlie Rose was so smooth I have forgotten which award he presented, but Armory Lovins of the Rocky Mountain Institute was surely the bravest and coolest of them all when he bared his Pocket Protector & Pens when accepting the Design Mind Award for among very many other things, his Passive-solar Banana Farm.