Posts tagged with "Tribeca":

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Here’s how Morris Adjmi’s ghostly aluminum carbon copy of a warehouse in Tribeca is shaping up

On a prime Tribeca corner, Morris Adjmi has transformed an early 19th century coffee and tea warehouse into a fancy condo building—and built a mirror-image replica of the stately structure right next to it. Well, almost. Instead of repeating a brick and terracotta facade for the new building, Adjmi employs an aluminum skin with a plasma finish that reads like brick. The effect is like if the original building was dipped in silver paint. Or, as Morris Adjmi said on its website, "the new building is like a photographic negative or ghostly reflection of the original." Development watch-blog Field Condition recently stopped by the so-called Sterling Mansion where work seems pretty close to wrapping up. When completed, the project will house 32 condos, 29 of which have already been sold.
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DDG is set to begin construction on this razor-edged, triangular building in Tribeca

Two very narrow parking lots in Manhattan's Tribeca neighborhood will soon be filled in with a pair of very narrow condo buildings designed and developed by DDG. The firm's plan for 100 Franklin Street was approved by the Landmarks Preservation Commission in early 2014, but only recently made it through the Board of Standards and Appeals (BSA) which had to grant a zoning variance for the site. Crain's reported that given the tricky nature of the site, the BSA decided to wave a requirement for setbacks on upper floors. The two buildings, one six stories and the other eight, comprise 10 apartments that are set above ground-floor retail that faces 6th Avenue. DDG's non-profit arm has also agreed to convert a narrow pedestrian island across the street into a permanent park. The two buildings both have a red brick facade that appears partially pixellated as DDG has removed individual bricks here and there. At the street level, the building has arched masonry frames and a ribbon of plantings that runs the length of the building, just above the glassy storefront spaces. Taking a cue from the angled site, 100 Franklin forms a point at its northern edge. Construction is slated to start this fall and wrap up in 2017.
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Watch Herzog & de Meuron’s under-construction 56 Leonard tower rise in a New York minute

Herzog & de Meuron's New York City skyscraper, 56 Leonard—aka the "Jenga Tower" because of its stacked-cube appearance, is steadily rising in Tribeca. While the building currently has a pretty standard glass box form with some protruding balconies, its upper floors will taper dramatically, hence the nickname. https://vimeo.com/121215554 Ahead of the tower topping out this summer, the 56 Leonard team has a released a one-minute timelapse video that shows the building's progress over the last 14 months. It's a fun (and quick) watch, and nicely builds anticipation for the tower's final form. [h/t Curbed]
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New York City just made biking down cobblestone streets way more fun

Cobblestone streets are beautiful to walk around and add charm to historic neighborhoods, but biking down these bumpy thoroughfares is another story. New York City has solved that problem with a new design treatment to a block-long cobblestone bike lane along Varick Street in the city's Tribeca neighborhood. https://vimeo.com/127628966 NYC Department of Transportation Bicycle Program Project Manager Nick Carey explained the new lane to Streetfilms this week. He said the project is part of a major north-south route in Lower Manhattan, the south leg following Varick Street. "The thing with cobblestones is, you can ride a bike on cobblestones, it's just not very comfortable," Carey said. "So naturally, a lot of cyclists were using the sidewalk," which is illegal in the city if you're over the age of 12. Carey said the granite lane was installed to preserve the historic nature of the street. In house crews saw cut the path for the granite pavers out of the cobblestone road bed, laid down the bike lane with an asphalt base, and hand-fit stones around it. The smooth path is narrow, as it only has to fit a bike tire, but the overall bike lane is six feet wide, delineated with offset cobbles. The granite bike lane is located just south of Canal Street. "It's a new tool we have in our toolbox," Carey said. "Just like green paint, or bollards, or signage."
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Catch this show of Lina Bo Bardi’s furniture and Roberto Burle Marx’s tapestries before it closes!

Tribeca's R & Company gallery at 82 Franklin Street is highlighting two Brazilian greats: Lina Bo Bardi (1914–1992) and Roberto Burle Marx (1909–1994). But act fast! Furniture by Bo Bardi and tapestries by Burle Marx are on display through the end of this week—the exhibit closes April 30. Lina Bo Bardi is best known for her monumental architecture, such as the sturdy São Paulo Museum of Art or the rugged SESC Pompéia in São Paulo. But her work in this exhibit, Lina Bo Bardi + Roberto Burle Marx, represents a much smaller scale. Furniture designed from the 1950s through the 1980s and executed in wood, metal, and leather show how her Brazilian modern thinking translated to the size of a chair. Designs dually showcase strong geometry and classic Brazilian curves that are a hallmark of her larger built work. In fact, a dining set on view in the exhibit was designed with Marcelo Ferraz and Marcelo Suzuki for the SESC Pompéia. Complementing Bo Bardi's furniture are textiles and totems by Roberto Burle Marx, generally regarded as the father of Brazilian landscape architecture. Playful patterns and geometric shapes are present in a variety of Burle Marx's larger projects such as the iconic Copacabana boardwalk, a modern interpretation of historic Portuguese paving designs; collaborations with Oscar Niemeyer in Brasilia; and private estates throughout the country. Zoom out on these landscape designs and you can see a clear connection between the large-format works and his smaller textiles and tapestries. In addition to landscape architecture, Burle Marx was a trained artist and sculptor with a keen interest in Brazilian folk art, themes that appear in his colorful wooden totems on display in this exhibit. Check out these works for yourself at R & Company in Tribeca through April 30.
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Plan for a parametric townhouse of undulating brick “flames” is rekindled in Tribeca

Getting the blessing of the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission can be a tricky thing. Typically, your best bet is to go contextual: stick with historic materials and keep the modern ornamentation to a minimum. That is clearly not the approach that SYSTEMarchitects' Jeremy Edmiston took for a parametrically designed Tribeca townhouse in search of facelift. The existing two-story structure 187 Franklin is not historically significant, but since it sits within a historic district, Edmiston didn't have carte blanche for the owners requested two story addition and setback penthouse. While the architect nods to Tribeca’s history with a primarily brick facade, he doesn’t try to replicate the building’s neighbors. At all. Instead, he assembles a new facade in such a way that it makes the new townhouse appear as if it is entirely engulfed in flames. Home-y? Maybe not. Interesting? Undeniably. Landmark Preservation Commission approved? Unanimously. That approval came back in 2011 and now the Tribeca Citizen is reporting that the project "is back." Edminston told AN that construction is already underway and that the project is slated to be completed in December. The structure’s parametric facade frees bricks from their expected pattern and weaves them into what appear as dancing flames. Between these “flames” are angled windows intended to bring in light while preserving privacy for the family of four. Each floor also gets a steel, mesh-like balcony.
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In Construction> Herzog & de Meuron’s 56 Leonard

It's impossible to look at renderings of Herzog & de Meuron’s 56 Leonard and not immediately think of Jenga, the game guaranteed to shame one unlucky partygoer for pulling the wrong piece and ruining everyone's fun. Good times! Anyway, back to 56 Leonard in New York City—the 60-story, glassy version of that nerve-wracking game. The project was first unveiled back in September 2008, at almost the exact moment the global economy started to nosedive. So, needless to say, 56 Leonard got off to a slow start. But now the tower is rising quickly and slated to open next year. Construction watcher Field Condition recently photographed the building which has passed its 40th floor and is starting to get its glassy exterior. On the building's first few floors, erratic, cantilevering balconies create that aforementioned Jenga-like effect. But on higher floors, the Jenga-ness of the building quickly fades as the balconies fall into a more conventional pattern, appearing less like bricks from the game and more like, well, balconies. This should change, though, as the building continues to rise as its most dramatic cantilevering theatrics are reserved for its tapering top.
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Department of Buildings Approves Aby Rosen’s Plans for 67 Vestry

In yet another round of preservationist vs. developer, it appears developer has won again. This time, the fight took place at 67 Vestry Street in Tribeca—the site of an 11-story palazzo building that came to life as a warehouse for the Great Atlantic and Pacific Tea Company in 1897.  BuzzBuzzHome reported that the Department of Buildings has approved plans by prolific developer and art collector Aby Rosen for an 11-story luxury condo building at the site. As AN reported last spring, the building's tenants tried to stop those plans by launching a petition to landmark the structure. The building is not just architecturally distinct, they said, it was a cornerstone in Tribeca's rapidly disappearing arts scene. 67 Vestry once housed artists including John Chamberlain, Marisol, and Andy Warhol. As BuzzBuzz noted, though, there appear to only be interior demolition permits filed, so there is a chance the exterior could be saved. SLCE is serving as the architect of record for this project.
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Kohn Pedersen Fox Sprouting Glass Superlatives Around New York City

Kohn Pedersen Fox (KPF) is racking up an impressive collection of superlatives with a host of new glass towers in New York City. Of course there is Hudson Yards where a glossy KPF-designed building will become the tallest tower at the country's largest private development site, but that is just the start of it. In April, renderings appeared for the firm’s 64-story, cantilevering glass tower in Gramercy. The structure, which has a multi-story masonry facade, reaches 777 feet, making it the tallest residential building between Midtown and Downtown. Unsurprisingly, 45 East 22nd Street is going condo. Moving right along to 101 Tribeca, another all-glass condo building. NY YIMBY reported that this tower, which houses 129 units, rises from a more narrow base and then curves its way up to a pinnacle at 950 feet. At that height, 101 becomes the tallest residential building in Lower Manhattan...for now. Now back to Hudson Yards for a moment. As KPF's 30 Hudson Yards rises to 1,227 feet  and its more modest sibling, 10 Hudson Yards, climbs to a respectable 895, new renderings surfaced for 55 Hudson Yards. This tower, designed by KPF and Kevin Roche, is still glassy, but slightly less so thanks to a metallic grid that frames its 900 feet. According to the developer, Related, the 1.3-million-square-foot structure is inspired by early modernism and Soho commercial buildings. And then there is One Vanderbilt in Midtown. According to NY YIMBY, this glass giant reaches a pinnacle at 1,450 feet making it the second tallest tower in New York. But why stop there? If One Vandy gets approved to go just one foot higher it gains yet another superlative—topping Chicago's Willis Tower. And that, folks, makes it the second tallest tower in the Western Hemisphere. While not officially approved, the building has already become the glossy symbol of Midtown East Rezoning—a plan to upzone the area around Grand Central Terminal. That proposal died under Mayor Bloomberg, but has found new life under his successor. If the controversial rezoning ultimately does move forward, it likely won't take effect until 2016. Fear not One Vanderbilt, the city is expected to give this 1.6-million-square-foot tower a special permit to kick things off ahead of schedule.
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Shigeru Ban’s Modern Penthouse Addition Unites Indoor and Outdoor Spaces in Manhattan

Renderings for Shigeru Ban's rooftop addition to a landmark Tribeca building have been revealed. Newly recast as a luxury residential space, the 132-year old cast-iron building located at 67 Franklin Street at Broadway is set to receive a new metal-and-glass-clad cap. This twin duplex penthouse will be joined by a revamped interior also designed by the Japanese architect. The existing structure will be filled by 11 duplex apartments. Since purchasing the space in 2002, Knightsbridge Properties president Jordan Krauss undertook a three-year effort to restore the cast-iron details that are the distinctive feature of the building. Ban was recruited in order to add modifications that would "work in harmonious dialogue with the existing structure." The penthouse he envisioned in response to this task will feature a Vierendeel truss (invented by this man) that will allow for first-floor glass doors to be opened up entirely, thus creating uninterrupted expanses between interiors and surrounding terraces. While images have yet to be released, the new design for the interior is said to feature extensive amounts of white lacquer and a bamboo-filled garden courtyard. In 2012 Ban pitched his plans for an addition to an adoring Landmarks Preservation Commission, with one panel-member gushing that the proposal was breathtaking. While the recently revealed renderings may or may not produce quite that kind of reaction today, the apartments they represent are expected to demand prices in the $12 to 15 million range. The Ban design may soon be joined by a number of other projects slated to adorn historic Manhattan rooftops.
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Lineup Announced For NYC’s Architecture & Design Film Festival

From October 16th through the 20th, Tribeca Cinemas will serve host to the Architecture & Design Film Festival, the country’s leading film festival for the architecture and design community. The festival will offer 25 film screenings, ranging in length from two to 95 minutes, each offering 15 distinct programs, in addition to panel discussions and book signings with internationally renowned designers and filmmakers. See the full schedule here and check out the full list of films with selected trailers below. Tickets go on sale October 1. Full list of films:
  • ABC of Architects
  • The Absent Column
  • Archiculture
  • Away From All Suns!
  • The Barragán House. A Universal Value
  • Bending Sticks: The Sculpture of Patrick Dougherty
  • Building Is People
  • Built on Narrow Land
  • Fagus – Walter Gropius and the factory for modernity
  • Grow Dat Youth Farm
  • Helsinki Music Centre – Prelude
  • The Human Scale
  • If You Build It
  • The Interior Passage
  • The Latin Skyscraper
  • My Brooklyn
  • Not Shown for Clarity
  • The Oyler House: Richard Neutra's Desert Retreat
  • Paul Smith, Gentleman Designer
  • Sagrada – The Mystery Of Creation
  • Skyscape
  • Social Life of Small Urban Spaces
  • Subject, Theory, Practice: An Architecture of Creative Engagement
  • Tadao Ando - From Emptiness to Infinity
  • The Vision of Paolo Soleri: Prophet in the Desert
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Ismael Leyva Architects’ Skinny Residential Tower Set To Rise in Tribeca

Back in October 2010, ground was broken at 19 Park Place—which also has frontage on Murray Street directly across from AN's office. As Curbed reported nearly three years ago, the 25-foot-wide site was set to be the home of the Tribeca Royale, a futuristic, 21-story condominium tower designed by New York-based Ismael Leyva Architects and developed by ABN Reality. Signage on the construction site and a press release that landed in our mailbox today assure that the project is still going forward as planned, but a peek out of the office window confirms that progress on this Jetsonian tower has been moving at a stone-aged pace. Ismael Leyva Architects' design fits 24 residences into a 292-foot tower on the narrow site. The upper 11 floors contain full-floor units, with duplexes on the 7th and 8th floors. Every unit will feature windows on Park as well as Murray. The 53,000-square-foot project also includes a double height lobby, gym, residents’ lounges, and ample terraces. “Our goal with the Tribeca Royale was to create a state-of-the-art residential building that showcases unique urban design given the constraints of the site, while efficiently maximizing space,” said Ismael Leyva in a statement. “This design offers unique residences in a very desirable downtown location” While AN eagerly awaits its shinny new neighbor, it seams like construction crews have been doing more digging than building over the past few years. A worker on site confirmed that problems with the foundation have been the cause of the delay, but with activity on the site seemingly never ceasing, one can assume that something must be going up soon.