Posts tagged with "Trespa":

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Specsheet>Standout building envelopes and facade panels

Highly customizable facade panels offer a variety of aesthetics limited only by an architect’s imagination, while high-performance stone and terra-cotta systems raise the bar for invisible building envelopes. Escale Golden Anodized GKD Metal Fabrics An anodized aluminum product that can be used in facade design as well as solar management, this 37-percent open-weave metal mesh is suitable for new and retrofit projects and is easily applied over existing facades to create a fresh look. ALPHATON Terracotta Rainscreen Facade System Shildan This envelope system is made from natural clay, making it an eco-friendly option that comes in 18 standard and unlimited custom colors, as well as a range of shapes and finishes, all of which are customizable (or all of which can be customized to suit a project’s unique design intent). Panels, which contain a chain of internal i-beam supports, can be incorporated horizontally or vertically. The system’s ventilation is on the outside of an air or vapor barrier, which enhances insulation and cuts energy consumption by up to one-third.  Selective Polish Zahner Zahner works closely with clients
 to create surfaces that combine texture and shine by blasting or brushing stainless steel, a stunning yet subtle technique to make metal facades stand out. The brand uses acid etching to create custom finishes, including perforation, which can allow a project to come to life when backlit. Virgola, Le Pietre Incise Collection by Lithos Design Part of Lithos Design’s original line, the Incise Collection now includes an array of undulating graphic patterns that create subtle optical illusions. The designs are available on a variety of different stone slabs, which are machined flat. The Virgola pattern was inspired by the comma and creates a repeating design that can be interpreted in many ways. Trespa Pura NFC Decors Trespa At this year’s IBS, Trespa released ten new colors and two new wood patterns to their Décor line. Each panel is made of 70 percent natural fibers saturated with thermosetting resins with a closed surface to offer supreme weather resistance. Pura NFC can be applied both horizontally and vertically, whether side by side or in a lap pattern. Carbon Pro-Fit® Modera™Ledgestone Cultured Stone by Boral Comprised of 58 percent pre-consumer recycled content, Carbon Pro-Fit Modera is a high-quality manufactured stone product that is available in three natural color options. This product is easy to install and GREENGUARD Gold certified. Mockett-ArchNews-Digital-04-17-v1

Solid Brass Grommets offer a luxurious wire management solution for executive work desks and conference tables. MM Series - 4 sizes, 7 finishes.

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Product>First Impressions

Achieve a classic look with natural wood paneling, or an ultramodern, futuristic style with innovative metal cladding. 3D Perforated Metal Zahner

One of Zahner’s classic facade manufacturing techniques has now become streamlined thanks to its automated method for creating perforated louvered screen wall facade systems. Now it is easy to create picotage effects for architectural metal that allow airflow without harsh sunlight.

Fabrik Shildan for Flexbrick

Fabrik is very much like a textile for exterior architecture. It consists of a steel framework into which materials are woven (including terra-cotta, glass, wood, etc.) to create endless patterns in a flexible architectural mesh. In addition to facades, Fabrik can be used for pavement, roofing, shade screens, and more.

Hudson Cambridge Architectural

Designed for parkade facades, Hudson is a new stainless-steel mesh pattern and exterior cladding system with an open area of 82 percent. It provides a high level of ventilation, while still being capable of screening indirect sunlight and exterior views from the street. 

Simple Modern Pure + Freeform

Inspired by the designer and creative director’s travels throughout Europe, the finishes are meant to evoke tradition and craft. The Blue Rust finish was taken from the Beverly Pepper sculpture installation outside of the Ara Pacis in Rome. All nine finishes can be used for both interior and exterior spaces.

Prodex Prodema

Available in an astonishing ten colors, ProdEx is a construction kit for the cladding of ventilated facades made from natural wood panels consisting of a high density bakelite core, clad in a veneer of natural wood with a surface treated with synthetic resin and an exterior PVDF film, which protects it from solar radiation, dirt, and graffiti.

Pura NFC Trespa Pura NFC (natural fiber core) is a sustainable exterior cladding made from up to 70 percent natural fibers infused with thermosetting resins. Pura resembles real wood, is easy to clean, and comes in six natural wood tones. It is also certified by the Programme for the Endorsement of Forest Certification.
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Product> Six Materials and Systems for Great Facade Design

Whether it's a unitized wall panel to facilitate faster build-speed or a cladding material that promises unlimited creative expression, new products for facades elevate both the art and science of design. Formawall Graphix Series Centria This single component wall system facilitates the design of complex patterns that combine horizontal, vertical, and diagonal reveals within a single panel. The panels have a steel face and liner, along with factory foamed-in-place insulation that fills the voids in the panel joinery and prevents a reduction in thermal values. They also features pressure-equalized horizontal joinery that provides long term protection with minimal maintenance. Linearis Swisspearl For installing with open joints, these rectangular panels are available in four sizes. Rot resistant, incombustible, and low in maintenance, the LEED-eligible planks are offered in more than 50 colors. Build-A-Pattern Cambridge Architectural To enhance solar shading and facade appearance, this new design program allows architects to combine multiple patterns of varying densities within a single panel of metal mesh. StrongFix TheSize Created for architects looking to design sleek, sturdy facades with minimal hassle, StrongFix from TheSize Surfaces is a new all-in-one ventilated façade and installation system featuring slim, large-format Neolith tiles pre-fitted with metal brackets. The first system of its kind, StrongFix is also slated to be ICC certified this summer. Meteon Trespa In a new palette of six grey colors that complement other facade elements like windows and doors, these matte-finish panels have a grained effect that perfectly mimics the source pattern of the wood. Weather- and UV-resistant, the panels have a closed-surface structure, which keeps the product smooth and easy to clean. Column Covers Moz Designs These column covers are fabricated from heavy gauge, solid-core aluminum in round, square, oval, and racetrack configurations. Pre-formed and pre-engineered for easy on-site installation, the covers are available in more than 500 combinations of color, grain, and pattern.
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China Talks

It was a panel I couldn’t refuse: To moderate a talk with two architects from China about sustainability.  Not that it’s a topic with which I am very familiar, but I would guess that even architects working there find much about the Chinese approach to environmental issues a mystery. I do know that the country has a $375 billion dollar construction industry devouring resources and that, at least ten years ago, a new coal-fired plant was being built every ten days. But things are changing fast and the chance to talk to Wang Degang who has his own 20-person firm in Nanjing and with Mesh Chen Dongliang who has been working for the past six years at Arquitectonica’s Shanghai office about their impressions was quite an opportunity. The event called “Deconstructing China: Dialogues on Design Process and Sustainability” was organized by the Trespa Design Centre, a pretty ambitious move for a manufacturer of high-end architectural panels but entirely in keeping with the company’s agenda to make the center an inspirational and educational source for architects and designers. English was a problem. But it was not an insurmountable one, and the two architects were wonderfully game making a huge effort to provide the most upfront answers to questions comparing LEED and China’s approximately five-year-old Three Star green-building certification program and questions posing whether or not there is broad popular support for environmental measures. To the latter, they answered frankly that it was largely a government directive, guided pretty much by the desire to be competitive with the West.  Mr. Wang offered that he was able to convince private clients to incorporate some green features by saying it was trendy. Mr. Mesh noted that the government is concerned about the environmental waste in the construction industry but has decided to deal first with the more urgent demands of industrial and water pollution. After that, he said, they will direct more attention to building green.  Also on the panel was FxFowle’s director of sustainability, Ilana Judah who knows the LEED system cold and was able to reveal interesting differences and incompatibilities between the USGBC rating system and Three-Star, the most interesting of which was that the latter is performance based and buildings cannot be certified until a full year after occupancy.  It also came out that, at this point, LEED is the default program used in both international buildings and buildings of any ambition and that only some 20-30% buildings currently in China have achieved, or aim to achieve, Three-Star status. Generally, the two do not mix on the same project. When the floor was opened to questions, Cliff Pearson of Architectural Record asked about sustainable approaches to urban planning but the panelists seemed to agree that urban planning as we know it here is handled differently there. Or I think that’s what they said.  A Chinese gentleman in the audience asked a drawn out, heavily-accented, and multi-faceted question involving intentionality, architects, government, and nature. The panelists looked to me to translate and I hazarded a complete guess: Do architects in China want to be green?  They both answered with a resounding, Yes!