Posts tagged with "Tower":

Placeholder Alt Text

Snøhetta reveals tapered residential tower for Manhattan’s Upper West Side

Snøhetta has released the first renderings for a split, tapering tower set to rise between Lincoln Center and Central Park in New York City. Snøhetta hopes that this reimagined tower-on-a-base scheme for 50 West 66th will simultaneously engage pedestrians at street level, while also paying homage to the surrounding neighborhood through the use of a familiar material palette. At 775-feet tall, the 127-unit residential building will stick out from the traditionally lower-slung neighborhood surrounding it, but Snøhetta has carved away bulk from the tower’s upper floors to minimize 50 West 66th’s effect on the skyline. Referencing Manhattan’s long history of natural stone construction, the studio has described the tower as being sculpturally excavated, and the 16th-floor amenity terrace prominently cleaves the building into two volumes. Even at that height, residents will be able to see across Central Park to the east, as well as across Hudson River to the west. A two-story textured limestone, bronze and glass retail podium will also contain an entrance for an adjacent synagogue on 65th street and create an approachable neighborhood access point. More windows are introduced to the limestone facade as the bulk of the building rises above the podium’s setback, and the slender tower portion is clad in a bronze and glass curtain wall.  Other than the planted, multi-story terrace that anchors 50 West 66th, the tower portion has had its corners sliced away to expose balconies at its opposing corners and create a series of cascading loggias. Triangular, bronze-panel-clad cutaways taper the tower’s corners and join at the tip to form an angular crown. The warm materials, cutaways and slim top all serve to soften the building’s presence in what has been a historically low-to-mid-rise area. The project’s reveal has come amidst a particularly busy month for Snøhetta. Besides being tapped for the Oakland A’s new stadium and an underwater restaurant, the Norwegian studio has also faced criticism for its proposed glassing over of Philip Johnson’s postmodern AT&T Building. Construction is expected to begin in the first half of 2018.
Placeholder Alt Text

Sou Fujimoto and Laisné Roussel unveil plans for a new vegetated tower complex in the south of France

Japanese architect Sou Fujimoto in collaboration with French firm Laisné Roussel have released plans for an 183,000-square-foot vegetated tower complex in Bordeaux. Titled "Canopia," the project comes after the RéInventer Paris scheme that saw Fujimoto and others respond to the task of reimagining the French capital with more vegetated proposals. In what appears to be a growing trend, green towers are sprouting up in Milan and Singapore courtesy of Stefano Boeri and WOHA, respectively. This mixed-use scheme sees four wooden towers, all bursting with trees and other plant life, rising to 164 feet. The lower levels will house retail space and offices with apartments. Above will be apartments with private balconies. Bordeaux City officials had invited Sou Fujimoto and Laisné Roussel to submit a proposal as part of a much wider 8.5 million square foot masterplan known as Euratlantique. The masterplan centers on the south eastern part of Bourdeaux where the Saint-Jean railway station will receive a new high-speed rail connection to Paris. With the new connection, Bordeaux hopes to establish itself as a major European city.   https://vimeo.com/158741801   Four vibrant roof gardens are located at the towers' peaks. Connectivity is a recurring theme within the project; staircases and other interior walkways are often prominently featured on the facade. Elongated timber needles connect the terraces. “Particular attention has been paid to delivering quality shared spaces, both on the fringes of the site with the terrace gardens, or at the heart of the development with the green oasis,” said the design team. In addition to acting as social spaces, the rooftops feature vegetable allotments, fruit trees, vines, a compost area, water reservoirs, winter garden, and a restaurant. In terms of structure, the building's timber frame comprises silver fir and spruce. Glu-lam wooden braces stabilize the building frame.
Placeholder Alt Text

Calatrava clinches international competition for observation tower in Dubai’s Creek Harbour

Santiago Calatrava took the top spot in an international design competition for an observation tower in the Ras Al Khor district of Dubai, commonly known as Creek Harbour. Awarding the prize was Vice President and Prime Minister of the UAE and ruler of Dubai, His Highness Sheikh Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum. The project has been hailed as an "architectural wonder" by His Highness Sheikh Mohammed, who also compared it to the Burj Khalifa and the Eiffel Tower. Beating five other firms in the competition, Calatrava's design draws on forms found in traditional Islamic art and architecture, while merging modern and sustainable design paradigms with the aesthetic. The curvature of the towers appears, from the render, to be derived from bézier curves (a form of mathematical parabola) which are comprised from straight lines. These lines, most likely to be steel cables, would be attached to a central core which rise up and punctuates the Dubai skyline. "Combining Islamic architecture with modern design, the tower at Dubai Creek will become a national monument as well as a cultural and tourist destination,” said Mohamed Ali Al Alabbar, president of Emaar Properties. The same developer was also behind the Burj Khalifa. "In our proposed design, we have united local traditional architecture with that of the 21st century,” said Calatrava in a press release.
Placeholder Alt Text

Report finds the Middle East could soon be too hot for human inhabitation as Dubai moves forward with its own indoor rainforest in a skyscraper

In an ironic twist, the global fuel powerhouse that is the Middle East is at risk of becoming too hot for human life due to the emissions produced as a result of creating that fuel. Such news evidently means little to the city of Dubai which is currently in line for two new luxurious skyscrapers, one of which will feature its very own rainforest. Jeremy Pal and Elfatih A. B. Eltahir recently published "Nature: Climate Change" which outlines how rising temperatures in the Persian Gulf will render the area inhospitable. The study compares a standard model of CO2 emissions over the course of 80 years to the temperatures deemed viable for human life. The more shocking news is that the research factors in mankind's predicted future efforts to curb emissions. The climate variables that were used to determine that human life was unsupportable were complex, though Pal and Eltahir simplified it, using a measurement called "wet bulb" heat. This was described as “a combined measure of temperature and humidity, or ‘mugginess'” by which a maximum exposure time of six hours to the conditions (of 95 Fahrenheit) was stated. Anything more “would probably be intolerable even for the fittest of humans,” they noted, adding that "even the most basic outdoor activities are likely to be severely impacted.” Toronto-based architect firm ZASA, however, has different ideas. Situated off Sheikh Zayed Road (SZR) in Al Thanyah First, two luxury towers in exuberant Dubai style will offer nothing other than the flamboyant panache that made the city famous: the complex boasts its own rainforest and an artificial beach. The 3.2 acre site will encompass the two, 47-story-high towers, a five storey podium, and two basement levels. Both towers will include a "sky lobby" and "sky pool." Meanwhile, the 450-room Key Hotel will offer fine dining restaurants, spa, a health club, and meeting rooms. The other tower is being called a "Serviced Apartment Tower." ZASA says that the architecture is meant to represent contemporary life in Dubai, while the "modernist" structures utilize "active frontage" via the implementation of podiums that proportion the towers. (h/t  The New York Times for Nature: Climate Change)
Placeholder Alt Text

This tower by Atkins and Arup will soon be the tallest skyscraper in Vietnam

Vincom Landmark 81, a massive skyscraper project in Ho Chi Minh City's lavish Vinhomes Central Park represents a collaboration between architects and engineers at Atkins and Arup. Developers at Vietnam-based Vingroup recently broke ground on the complex and when it's completed, the tower will be Vietnam's tallest at over 1,500 feet tall   Located on the banks of the Saigon River, the 81-story, mixed-used development will feature a luxury shopping center at the base of the tower, residential apartments, a hotel, and a few rooftop gardens. Its design, as stated on the Atkins website, "features a modern and unusual architecture design that symbolises the diversity and fast-emergence of Ho Chi Minh City." The varied heights of the structure's numerous masses and its glistering glass facade give the tower an icicle effect and allow the building to taper as it rises into the sky. At the top of each setback mass, a rooftop outdoor terrace will provide sweeping views of the surrounding city. Landmark 81, according to Atkins, is expected to be complete in 2017. "Our challenge was to create a unique and dynamic landmark tower design to support Vingroup's vision for a high-end mixed-use development," said Bertil de Kleynen, director of architecture and landscape for Atkins in the Asia Pacific region in a recent article. "The tower is integrated into the public realm that addresses sustainable design challenges at various interfaces of the project."
Placeholder Alt Text

Snøhetta continues San Francisco streak with downtown highrise, and the town is talking

The momentum continues in San Francisco for the Norwegian firm Snøhetta with a recently-unveiled tower at the corner of the city's Market Street and Van Ness Avenue. And the project has been garnering some fairly untraditional responses from citizens. As proposed, the curving, 37-story One Van Ness tower would be divided by three large cuts, designed to lessen wind load and provide new common spaces. Paired with SCB, Snøhetta will work to replace a tower originally proposed on the site by Richard Meier and Partners. The building's carved-out center has also provided inspiration for illustrators to poke fun. Illustrator Susie Cagle, who told CityLab that the design reminded her of the last SF boom's "bubble mentality," drew the distressed building on the left, while Twitter user The Tens seems to think the building doesn't much care for its neighborhood, as demonstrated in the image below right. San Francisco Chronicle architecture critic John King took note of the parodies and dubbed theSnøhetta's creation the "Talking Tower." He was quick to add in another tweet that the impromptu naming was "not a critique"—he says he quite likes the tower. AN recently talked to Snøhetta principal Craig Dykers about his firm's continuing success in San Francisco, including an extension to SFMOMA, a consulting role on the (recently revised, and moved) Golden State Warriors Arena and a (ultimately unsuccessful) shortlisting for the Presidio Parklands. snoheta-sf-tower-03
Placeholder Alt Text

Sou Fujimoto’s Outlook Tower is a Stacked Mirage in Saudi Arabia

Tokyo-based architect and creator of this year's Serpentine Pavilion, Sou Fujimoto, has recently unveiled his latest rendering of Outlook Tower and Water Plaza, a proposal that's part of his master plan development for the coastal resort district of Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. His proposed 473,612-square-foot structure is based on a vernacular type of Islamic architecture and mirrors the shape of Bedouin tents. Seen from afar, their silhouettes are designed to form the shape of a mirage-like gateway linking the mainland to the sea. Fujimoto’s idea was to create a tower that would represent the forest and its intricate web of natural elements. The numerous towers act as natural airstream barriers, as the strong winds, particularly coming from the north, are funneled vertically into the space below. This circulation of air provides a cool breeze and the south-facing facades bring in natural light into indoor spaces. The building includes eco-friendly elements such as solar panels installed on its roof to provide energy and natural heat and an integrated geothermal heat pump system to cool the building. By creating a space that bridges order and chaos, Fujimoto was able to generate a futuristic prototype comprised of arching modules stacked one on top of the other, each measuring between 10 to 40 feet. As a whole, the resulting organization creates a mesmerizing architectural spectacle. Multiple waterfalls are placed across the arches of the structure, feeding water into a large dock at the base of the tower. Fujimoto also included other elements that provide sources of natural light that altogether create a series of multiple transparent towers.