Posts tagged with "Top":

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Video> Amazingly BIG Fly-By at 57th Street Tower

We told you this morning about new details surrounding the Durst Fetner Residential's Bjarke Ingels-designed West 57th Street tower, but now there so much more to share. BIG's Danish office has released additional renderings, detailing Manhattan's surf-and-turf hybrid tower in all it's mountainous glory. And you won't want to miss the fly-by video, either! As Bjarke Ingels has said before, West 57 is all about typological diversity, combining elements through what he calls his Manifesto of Bigamy. Ingels' design language is apparent in his first American design beyond the obvious mountain and sailboat references of its overall form. Equally iconic moves include meticulously crafted views shaped by the central courtyard and a jagged floor plan that creates a highly textured facade. At 467-feet tall, West 57 is slated to contain over 600 residential units, including 20 percent of units marked as affordable. Durst, developer of the LEED-Platinum One Bryant Park Tower, also plans to push for LEED Gold in Hell's Kitchen. “New York is rapidly becoming an increasingly green and livable city. The transformation of the Hudson River waterfront and the Highline into green parks, the ongoing effort to plant a million trees, the pedestrianization of Broadway and the creation of more miles of bicycle lanes than the entire city of my native Copenhagen are all evidence of urban oases appearing all over the city. With West 57th we attempt to continue this transformation into the heart of the city fabric – into the center of a city block,” Bjarke Ingels said in today's release.
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Unveiled> BIG News From Hell′s Kitchen

Surf-and-turf sure is delicious! We've been eagerly awaiting news from Bjarke Ingels' New York debut on 57th Street in Hell's Kitchen, and today, the Durst Organization, project developer, has released new details of New York's mountain-to-be. New York magazine got the exclusive, this weekend revealing a new rendering of the 450-foot-tall apartment tower poised to redefine the architecture of the stodgy box. Last month, Ingels was guarded in discussing his ambitious plans for New York, but he wasn't kidding when he told AN of his intention to wed the traditional European courtyard block with an American skyscraper. And appropriate to Ingels' emerging philosophy of "bigamy," exemplified by the classic American surf-and-turf, the new tower simultaneously resembles a snow-capped mountain peak and a white-sailed vessel docked on Manhattan's west side. 57th Street's form responds to disparate site conditions with requisite thought and artistry of any BIG project. Ingels told NY magazine that the building's form pushes for a "blatant" connection to the Hudson River greenway while responding to multiple challenges on a site clinging to its industrial past, including adjacency to an elevated highway and a parking garage for garbage trucks. The tower slopes and twists to avoid blocking views while also reducing traffic noise. Just as Ingels promised, the tower features a lush, landscaped courtyard sliced into the middle of the rising mountainside, forming a sort of soft, green oasis along the building's sharp ascent. Balconies have also been pierced into the facade in a similar manner. The design still faces a series of regulatory hurdles in coming months, beginning with a community board meeting this Wednesday. We'll be watching Ingels closely, so stay tuned for a mountain of updates!
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Competing Visions for Chicago, Big and Small

Two new competitions of note explore possible futures for Chicago's public realm. The 2011 Burnham Prize ideas competition sponsored by AIA Chicago and the Chicago Architectural Club calls for new visions for the McCormick Place East building, the 1971 modernist covention center on the lakefront designed by Gene Summers of C.F. Murphy Associates. The massive, Miesian building has a powerful presence on the lakefront, and a vast column-free interior, but parks advocates have long contended it should be removed. Meanwhile, the building's owner, the Metropolitan Pier and Exposition Authority, says it needs $150 million in repairs and is functionally obsolete. The competition aims to inspire new dialogue around the future of the building and site. The Street Furniture 2011 competition sponsored by Architecture for Humanity's Chicago chapter aims for something more universal, new street furniture that could be deployed to activate almost any vacant site. With a $1000 budget in mind, the competition calls for a piece or pieces of street furniture that could activate an open lot for a year in anticipation of future development as a garden. The furniture could then also be moved to a new site. The winning design will be built and installed at an unnamed location.
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Partying for the World Architectural Festival

The 2011 World Architecture Festival was in town beating the drum for their international competition at the Van Alen Institute last night. Paul Finch, the festival's program director, was joined by AN Editor-in-Chief William Menking and Van Alen Chair Abbey Hamlin in hosting the star-studded event. The frigid weather did not deter a distinguished crowd—white maned Richard Meier, red scarved Bernard Tschumi, man of the hour Thomas Leeser, Parks Commish Adrian Benepe—from celebrating what promises to be a hot ticket this November in Barcelona. With his English lilt Finch thanked the crowd for coming and promised his remarks would steer clear of Ricky Gervais territory. He briefly outlined some of the goals for this year's program, which included a bigger tent to incorporate interior architecture as well. While no hat was passed, Finch did say that the organization would be happy to take donations in any denomination. Jan Berman of MechoShade promptly offered to make a donation in lira.
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The Weekly Review

For readers of the paper—the print paper, that is—you know full well the importance of our reviews section, just as vital to the pulse of the architectural discourse as the news and features we regularly publish. Online, however, we have never had a good, dedicated place for these disquisitions on the latest books, exhibitions, and ephemera. But, no longer! Now, we will be posting one review from recent issues each Friday, for your weekend enjoyment. Perhaps you can pull it up on your new iPad with the Sunday Times, or print it out and enjoy with a bloody mary or two. We know that's what Herbert Muschamp, subject of our inaugural effort, would have done. And don't forget to check back next Friday for more. Until then, happy reading.