Posts tagged with "Theaters":

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L.A.'s historic Earl Carroll Theatre will reopen as an entertainment complex

The Earl Carroll Theatre has gone by a lot of names since it first opened in Downtown Hollywood in 1938: Moulin Rouge, Hullabaloo, Kaleidoscope, Aquarius Theatre, Longhorn Theatre, and Nickelodeon on Sunset, to name a few. Since Nickelodeon relocated two years ago and left the building without a tenant, the theater community has eagerly awaited the renovation of the building to its former glory. On September 25, it was announced that Thaddeus Hunter Smith, one of the former owners of the nearby Fonda Theatre, and business partner Brian Levian, had signed a ten-year lease with the intention of not only restoring the building’s original facilities, but also transforming the site into an entertainment complex, with spaces for concerts, stage shows, movie premieres, and other specialized events. “We’re thrilled to be revitalizing the theatre, returning it to its original Streamline Moderne design, and bringing all kinds of wonderful entertainment experiences to locals and visitors alike,” said Smith. Working in close collaboration with preservationists and Hollywood historians, the renovation of the theatre will include the renovation and recreation of many of the building’s original details, including a 20-foot neon depiction of Beryl Wallace, Carroll’s girlfriend and muse, that once hung above the street entrance. Because it “exemplifies the optimism and grandeur of pre-war Hollywood,” according to the Los Angeles Conservancy, the building was designated a Historic-Cultural Monument in December 2016. It was originally designed by Gordon B. Kaufmann for director and producer Earl Carroll as a supper club and performance theatre, both of which were once world-famous for their over-the-top presentations. According to the Los Angeles Historic Theatre Foundation, the theatre hosted shows “on a massive stage with a 60-foot wide double revolving turntable and staircase plus swings that could be lowered from the ceiling,” while the supper club “featured a chorus of 60 girls singing and dancing while patrons dined in style.” The theatre is currently owned by developer Essex Property Trust, which first nominated the building for historic-cultural landmark status and has already begun construction on Essex Hollywood, a mixed-use development with 200 apartment units on the opposite side of the site. The Earl Carroll Theatre is slated to reopen to the public in late 2020.

Photography Tour: Historic Theaters of Downtown Baltimore

Tour downtown Baltimore for fascinating stories and photography tips with photographer Amy Davis, author of Flickering Treasures: Rediscovering Baltimore’s Forgotten Movie Theaters. Explore the revival of the historic Hippodrome and Everyman theaters and ponder the fate of other grand picture palaces on the city's west side, the Stanley and Mayfair. Bring your smartphone or digital camera and snap away as you walk along the route. This program complements the exhibition Flickering Treasures: Rediscovering Baltimore’s Forgotten Movie Theaters. One-day Museum general admission pass with tour registration fee, which grants access to all exhibitions. Valid through November 30, 2019. Rain date September 28. $25. Pre-registration required. Space is limited to 15 people. Tickets are non-refundable and non-transferable. Online registration for this program closes at midnight the day before the program.
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David Costanza and Piergianna Mazzocca win 2019 Ragdale Ring competition with wobbling beds

The seventh annual Ragdale Ring design competition has been won by David Costanza of David Costanza Studio (DCS) and Piergianna Mazzocca for Shared Beds. Three wobbling, communal “beds”—reminiscent of Frida Escobedo’s Civic Stage at the 2013 Lisbon Architecture Triennale—will be built in Lake Forest, Illinois's Ragdale Ring garden in May and will host performances beginning in June. The Ragdale Ring competition is run by the nonprofit Ragdale Foundation, an artists’ residency in Lake Forest. Every year, young architects are invited to reinterpret the open-air Ragdale Ring theater designed by Howard Van Doren Shaw in 1912 through interventions that blend architecture, sculpture, and landscape design. Shared Beds, the winning submission from Houston-based partners Costanza and Mazzocca, contrasts the ever-changing and multi-purpose wood discs with beds, typically thought of as static objects. Two smaller discs join a larger disc that can be used as a stage. The movements of the players and visitors ultimately determine how each “bed” moves, and what it can be used for. “The Ragdale Ring has a long and impactful lineage; we are very excited and humbled to contribute our project, Shared Beds,” said Costanza. “The project challenges the role of the individual vis-à-vis the collective by reconsidering the seemingly inanimate quality of everyday objects such as beds. The residency and community engagement provide the ideal setting to share these ideas. We look forward to building the installation in the upcoming months!” This year’s Ragdale Ring jury included the Columbus, Ohio-based past winners Galo Cañizares and Stephanie Sang Delgado, who installed the loopy, mutable Noodle Soup at the garden last year. Zurich Esposito, executive vice president of the AIA Chicago, Ryan Biziorek of Arup, Jeffrey Meeuwsen, Ragdale’s executive director, and Regin Igloria, the Ragdale in Schools manager, rounded out the rest of the jury. Shared Beds was chosen from a pool of six finalists. Costanza and Mazzocca will be given a design-build residency at Ragdale and a $15,000 budget to help them build out Shared Beds for the debut in mid-June.
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Noodle Soup wins 2018 Ragdale Ring competition

The Ragdale Foundation, a nonprofit artist's community in Lake Forest, Illinois, has selected a design duo from Columbus, Ohio to design this year's Ragdale Ring. The temporary installation interprets the original Ragdale Ring, a theater in a garden designed by architect Howard Van Doren Shaw more than a century ago. Galo Canizares and Stephanie Sang Delgado, a project associate at DesignGroup, are calling their proposal Noodle Soup. In plan, five yellow-orange squiggles are loosely dispersed between blue and green objects that seem to weave the site's grassy lawn into lounge-y areas for seated relaxation. Here's what Canizares, a lecturer at the Ohio State University and founding principal of office cahad to say about the design: "[Noodle Soup] is conceived as an interactive playscape for outdoor performances. It consists of a set of fixed structures around which are soft, linear, pliable pieces of furniture. The soft elements can interact with the hard structures to serve functional purposes such as seating, but they can also act as oversized toys, freely configurable in a variety of ways." To build their design for its June 13 opening, Canizares and Delgado will have a design-build residency at Ragdale along with a $15,000 production grant. For the 2018 competition, an eight-member jury selected the duo's proposal from a pool of five finalists. The four runners-up were Wheeler Kearns's Iris, Katie MacDonald, Kyle Schumann, and Erin Pellegrino's Earthen Delight, Cyrus Penarroyo's Reflections on the Lawn, and Aleksandr Plotkin's Phantom.  Last year, Ann Arbor, Michigan–based T+E+A+M won the Ragdale Ring competition, and this year, four of the practice's members sat on the jury. They were joined by two representatives from the Ragdale Foundation, as well as Zurich Esposito of AIA Chicago and Phil Rosborough of Rosborough Partners. Prior winners include Bittertang, SPORTS, Design With Company, and Stephen Dietrich Lee. More information about the competition, opening day, and past winners can be found here.
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The Wharf, D.C.'s massive waterfront development, is now open

The Wharf–a $2 billion new development on a former industrial stretch of the D.C. waterfront–has finally opened. The developers are Madison Marquette and PN Hoffman, and the master architect and planner is Perkins Eastman. Previously the site was a mile-long stretch of boat storage, industrial space, and some back-door barbecue joints. At its northern end, it also includes the oldest fish market in the United States. Before the Wharf could be built, the existing seawall and promenade were torn up and replaced by an underground, two-story parking garage spanning the length of the development. The garages connect from below into an array of luxury residential structures with ground-level commercial space–restaurants, yoga studios, and other amenities. Last week all of these opened to the public–in total, 1.2 million square feet of mixed-use space including office structures, luxury and affordable residential space, a marina, and waterfront parks. The fish market was the only structure preserved as-is. The Anthem, a new 6,000-person theatre venue, is a cornerstone development of the Wharf. Designed by New York-based Rockwell Group, the venue is essentially a concrete volume hedged in by two L-shaped residential structures. The Anthem has a warehouse-like interior and two levels of balconies split into smaller, drawer-like extrusions. Massive steel panels flank the stage, laser cut and illuminated with the pattern of two enormous curtains drawn back, resembling the velvet drapery of Baroque theaters. The space is managed by a 30-year old staple organization in D.C. entertainment–the 9:30 Club–to whom the Wharf reached out in the initial stages. The building’s board-form concrete paneling and industrial facade are intended as a nod to the Club’s famed punk-laden lineups. In the lobby, one can look up through an installation of floating cymbals to four rectangular skylights three floors up. If you look closely, the skylights ripple with water–the underbelly of a pool for a residential structure stacked above. A key design challenge for the Anthem was its siting between two residential structures. To address the noise issue, Rockwell spent several million dollars designing a multi-layered sound barrier between the structures, which are reportedly so effective that amplified concerts are inaudible from the interiors of apartments less than a hundred feet away. Supposedly, a resident could sleep soundly while Dave Grohl shredded away on opening night. The Anthem's neighboring structures include designs by FOX Architects, Kohn Pedersen Fox, Perkins Eastman, Parcel 3A, Cunningham Quill Architects, BBG_BBGM, Handel Architects, WDG Architecture, Studio MB, SmithGroup JJR, MTFA Architecture, SK&I, and Moffatt & Nichol. Only Phase One has opened. Phase Two will add an additional 1.2 million square feet to the overall site footprint, mostly extending south. The roster of new structures will include designs by firms such as SHoP Architects, Rafael Viñoly, Morris Adjmi Architects, Hollwich Kushner (HWKN), ODA, WDG Architecture, and Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates (MVVA). The expansion will include increased office and residential space, an additional pier and marina, as well as increased park space. Phase One is notably without much public greenery. The construction of Phase Two is slated to begin in 2018, with a projected opening of 2021.
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Disney will recreate this historic Kansas City theater

It is not likely that anyone has first-hand memories of the Willis Wood Theatre. Designed by noted Kansas City architect Louis Curtiss, and built in 1902, the impressive Beaux Arts theater burned to the ground in 1917. One hundred years later, as part of a major announcement at the D23 Expo 2017, Walt Disney Parks and Resorts announced it will be building a replica of the long-gone theater at near Main Street U.S.A. at the Magic Kingdom. The choice of a theater that no one has seen in a century is not random. Kansas City was the boyhood home of Walt Disney. Disney moved to Kansas City at the age of nine from Marceline, Missouri. While the small town of Marceline is the basis for the Main Street U.S.A. area at Magic Kingdom, there are also many references to Kansas City in the middle America–themed amusement park. In particular, signs from Kansas City's Laugh-O-Gram Studio, the studio in which Walt Disney invented Mickey Mouse, can be found throughout. While it is not known whether Disney ever attended shows at the Willis Wood Theatre, historians think it is likely. It is known that 33rd President Harry S. Truman frequented the theater to see Shakespeare plays performed. Built by Colonel Willis Wood, a successful dry goods merchant, the theater hosted live performances until being converted into a movie theater. Today the site of the block-and-half-long theater is home to the Mark Twain tower, a historic landmark in its own right. With no chance of the theater every being rebuilt in its original location, it would seem central Florida will be the place for those looking for turn-of-the-century Kansas City. The real question is whether the new theater's interior will match the reds, greens, blues, and gold that reportedly adorned the original, and whether the large nude caryatids will once again fill the main theater space.
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A look inside Flint's historic Capitol Theatre restoration

After the announcement of it restoration earlier this year, the first images of the refurbished interior of the iconic Flint Capitol Theatre have been released. Opened in 1928, the theater was designed by John Eberson and played host to many of the world’s largest acts until it closed in 1990. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places since 1985, the theater can seat 1,600 under a deep blue ceiling. Intended to evoke a Mediterranean courtyard, lighting effects mimic the changing light of sunset into a night sky. The space is filled with ornate plasterwork and statuary, making it the most lavish of the region's theaters. “The Capitol Theatre is a symbol of the resilient spirit of Flint and we are so looking forward to once again filling its halls with vibrant performances and programming that welcome the community back to this beautiful and historic space,” said Jarret M. Haynes, executive director of The Whiting, in a press release. Haynes is one of the lead partners spearheading the Capitol Theatre project along with the not-for-profit Uptown Reinvestment Corporation. “We are excited to launch a new era of live entertainment within this architectural gem and serve generations to come.” A series of soft openings and activities will reintroduce the public to the building starting in September. This first series of events is set to include film screenings, free performances by local groups, as well as tours of the buildings. The inaugural full season will begin in November, with programming soon to be announced. It is expected that the theater will host around 100 events a year entertaining 60,000 visitors annually.
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THEVERYMANY plants a zippy green theater in a Maryland park

Amid a park in the Baltimore suburbs lies a new outdoor theater by MARC FORNES / THEVERYMANY that's as green as the new leaf. The New York design studio's Chrysalis Amphitheater, a sinuous shingled pavilion whose form follows its name, features two stages for semi-outdoor performances and events. Stage A, the larger of the two, is equipped for larger performances and is kitted out for musical equipment and lighting rigs. Stage B, with its platform stage and steps that double as seating, is meant for smaller events. Other arches double as apertures for a staircase, balconies with city views, and a loading dock. The project broke ground in Columbia, Maryland's Symphony Woods Park in October 2015. Commissioned by park stewards Inner Arbor Trust, its shape references the curvy roots of the Swamp Cypress, a native tree. To achieve its curvature without adding too much weight the structure, Fornes, in collaboration with engineers at Arup, drew a flat digital mesh and transformed its segments into differentiated spring systems. Constraints for pleating were added to the system during inflation to give the structure extra depth, while ARUP engineered a steel-tubed exoskeleton and created 70-point loads that can each hold up to 2,000 pounds. Zahner fabricated the Chrysalis's 7,700 shingles, which are painted four different shades of electric green. “We want to provide not just a destination, but an experience for the morning jogger, the Sunday walker, the afternoon stroller, as well as anyone who is actually there for a show,” said Marc Fornes, principal of THEVERYMANY, in a prepared statement. “It is an amphitheater, yet it is first a pavilion in the park, an architectural folly, a tree house and a public artwork, ready to be engaged and activated at any given moment.”

THEVERYMANY first developed its idea with a similar, but smaller, installation in France. That project, Pleated Inflation, was installed at a school in Argeles, near the border with Spain.

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Landmarks approves new building around historic movie palace

This week the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) cleared the way for the owner of a historic but dilapidated theater to build a new structure around the interior and replicate its historic features, leaving the aura—but little of the original—in place. The movie theater, RKO Keith’s, is one of the city's only surviving "atmospheric" theaters built in the early 20th century. Abandoned since the mid-1980s, the opulent Churrigueresque structure's interior was landmarked in 1984, though a series of owners did little over time to curtail extensive deterioration inside. Now, a new owner, Xinyuan Real Estate, has hired Pei Cobb Freed & Partners to transform the Flushing, Queens building into 16 stories of offices and apartments. (Last week AN contributor Edward Gunts covered the theater's history and the current development.)
At a Tuesday meeting, the LPC voted unanimously to re-authorize a previously issued Certificate of Appropriateness to build out Pei Cobb Freed's vision and undertake preservation work on the interior. Plans call for retail and an apartment lobby to be built around the 1928 theater's landmarked ticket lobby and grand foyer (the rest of the interior was initially landmarked, but its protections were removed by the Board of Estimate after an appeal by an owner). Significant architectural elements will be conserved, while those too damaged for conservation or missing will be replicated offsite and reinstalled in the theater. Those changes, the LPC said, will be reviewed and permitted at staff level. Pei Cobb Freed is collaborating with New York–based historic preservation firm AYON STUDIO on the project. During the meeting, AYON founding principal Angel Ayón explained how steel trusses will span the landmarked interiors on the east-west and north-south axes to preserve the cavity as construction on the new building gets underway. When the architects have a new envelope, the team will be able to reinstall the plaster, woodwork, and new curtains. Ayón likened the work on the decorative features to the preservation of Times Square's Lyric Theater, which underwent a similar process to remove and conserve ornamental plaster.

The LPC is working with the owner to make sure plaster gets put back in place. The two parties agreed to $10 million bond for storage and periodic inspection of the plaster, though the commission said those details still being hammered out. One major requirement of interior landmarks is that they remain open to the public. Patrick Waldo of preservation advocacy group Historic Districts Council (HDC), as well as Christabel Gough of the Society for the Architecture of the City, raised concerns about the accessibility of a space that fronts a future (private) apartment lobby. HDC "strongly" suggested the street entrance be re-examined to expose the interior more fully; at the very least, the group recommended strong wayfinding signage to alert the public to the presence of the landmark.

To the knowledge of those in the room, there hasn't been another instance where an interior was preserved but the building around it demolished. Echoing others, Commissioner Frederick Bland summed up the situation as "very strange." With much of the theater's ornamentation slated for replication, “This is one of the strangest, if not the strangest, situation I’ve seen as a commissioner,” he said. “At what point is a landmark lost?"

To get more insight into the theater's place in New York history, Gunts reached out to Anthony Robins, a former senior preservation specialist at the agency who wrote the original designation report, for more on RKO Keith's. Here's what he had to say:

The recent history of the RKO Keith’s—once a mainstay of Flushing—has been dismal. Designed by Thomas Lamb—perhaps New York’s most prolific theater designer—it was planned originally as a vaudeville theater, with movies more or less an afterthought. Lamb designed it as a so-called “atmospheric” theater, attempting to create the illusion that the theater’s customers were seated outside, under the stars, in a picturesque Spanish village. The Spanish-inspired ornament ran throughout the theater into all its major spaces. Located at the major intersection of Main Street and Northern Boulevard, the Keith’s became a very visible institution in the neighborhood.
By 1984, the Keith’s, still in use as a movie theater, was one of only three major “atmospheric” theaters surviving in New York City (the others being the Loew’s Paradise in the Bronx and the Valencia in Queens, both now official landmarks). The Landmarks Preservation Commission’s designation of the Keith’s entire interior that year was cut back at the Board of Estimate to include just the grand foyer—apparently because a politically connected developer wanted to include the site in a proposed new shopping mall. That plan evaporated, as did the plans of a subsequent developer, but the Keith’s remained shuttered; for 30 years it has sat vacant, decaying and crumbling, its interiors long since vandalized, even as other grand movie palaces have been lovingly restored. Now comes the ultimate indignity of the proposed demolition of the theater shell, and the grand foyer’s disassembly and reconstruction, all by itself, as an odd relic of a vanished theater from another era. There can be no happy ending for this story.
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T+E+A+M tapped to design this year's Ragdale Ring outdoor theater

For the past four years, Ragdale, an artist residency in Chicago’s North Shore, has asked young architects to reimagine a historic garden stage that was once a focal point of its property. In these short years, the Ragdale Ring competition, and the accompanying Adrian Smith Prize, have proven to be architecturally adventurous, and often playfully eccentric.

This year’s iteration will be built by the Ann Arbor, Michigan–based T+E+A+M, a collaboration among young designers Thom Moran, Ellie Abrons, Adam Fure, and Meredith Miller. Their proposal, entitled LIVING PICTURE, superimposes images of the original 1912 Ragdale Ring onto a set of lightweight objects spread throughout the grounds. The scene of the original ring will be an immersive, if not surreal, space for the audience to become part of the theatrical setting. The varied scale of the objects also allows for the audience to position itself in relation to the stage, either sitting on or standing among the installation. The shapes, which make up the stage itself, will blend historic imagery with the lush surroundings of the property.

While the imagery on the installation will mostly be seen as disparate yet related images, audience members approaching from the Ragdale House will see the entire original Ring snap into view. Watching from the other approaches, viewers will discover the scene as a series of separate vignettes of the original.

“At the beginning of this year we suspended our individual practices and committed fully to T+E+A+M, but the fact that the four of us have practiced individually is one of the unique strengths of our collaboration,” Fure explained. “Each of us has different audiences through our previous work’s engagement with conversations inside and outside the discipline.

The objects will range in form, making up seating areas and platforms for performances. Arranged in seven clusters, most of the objects will also be hollow to provide storage. Their arrangement centralizes the audience while providing masked areas where performers can enter from stage-side.

The project will be built in late May, to be ready for four performances starting in mid-July. T+E+A+M, along with a group of workers, will live at Ragdale for 18 days to build the installation. The Adrian Smith Prize, sponsored by Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture, provides $15,000 for the construction.

The members of T+E+A+M are not strangers to exhibition and installation building. Between the four members, their work has been shown in multiple Venice biennales and at the Beijing International Art Biennale, the Shenzhen and Hong Kong Biennale, the Storefront for Art and Architecture, and the Graham Foundation, to name just a few.

T+E+A+M will join the ranks of past Ragdale Ring designers SPORTS Collaborative, Bittertang, Design With Company, and Stephen Dietrich Lee. Last year’s iteration by SPORTS, entitled Rounds, won The Architect’s Newspaper’s 2016 Best of Design Award for Temporary Installation.

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Historic Queens movie palace threatened with demolition

A 1928 vaudeville and movie palace in Queens by architect Thomas Lamb would be substantially demolished and replaced with a 269-unit residential tower designed by Pei Cobb Freed & Partners, under a plan that New York City’s Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) will consider Tuesday. RKO Keith’s Flushing Theater at 135-29 Northern Boulevard in Queens is the building that would be replaced by a residential tower. Along with the Valencia, in Jamaica, Queens, the RKO Keith’s appears to be one of two surviving "atmospheric" theaters of note still standing in New York in good condition, according to architectural historians. Originally seating 2,974 but closed since 1986, it featured marble staircases, an indoor fountain, gilded plasterwork and chandeliers in the auditorium, and a vaulted blue ceiling with lights that simulated stars. It’s listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The owner and developer of the Queens property is Xinyuan Real Estate, a Chinese firm that bought it last year for $66 million. Xinyuan is seeking to raze the bulk of the theater to make way for its project. The plan requires approval from the Landmarks Preservation Commission because the city has designated part of theater an interior landmark, and that means it can’t be altered without approval from the preservation panel. The theater as a whole was landmarked in 1984, as the best one of only two surviving movie palace atmospheric theaters in New York City, based in large part on the preserved condition of its auditorium and the reversible nature of its division into a three-screen cinema. That designation was later amended by the city's Board of Estimates to remove the auditorium and the majority of the theater, leaving landmark protection for the ticket lobby, original ticket booth, grand foyer, ceilings, and fixtures and interior components of these areas. The LPC issued a permit in 2005, extended to late 2017, to demolish all but the designated sections. After the transfer of ownership in 2016, with a new architect attached, the LPC has an opportunity to review an expiring Commission decision from 2005, when Queens was not as vibrant as it is today, and when the city approved substantial demolition of an exceedingly rare New York-specific community-centered building type in order to spur residential development in the area. Xinyuan, based in Beijing, is the latest in a series of owners who have attempted to redevelop the property. The developer has proposed to temporarily remove and restore plasterwork and other ornamental features from the protected section of the theater, while work on the residential tower is underway. It would then reinstall the plaster pieces as part of the replacement structure. The reinstalled sections would presumably provide a reminder of the larger theater that previously occupied the site and help attract residents. According to documents on file with the city, the developer’s application is to re-authorize a Certificate of Appropriateness for the construction of a new building to enclose the interior landmark, and to “disassemble, restore off site, and reinstall salvaged ornamental plasterwork and woodwork and replicas.” Ayon Studio is listed in the application as coordinating the preservation-related aspects of the lobby rehabilitation. Drawings on file with the city indicate that the Pei Cobb Freed tower would be 16 stories tall and glass-clad. It would be H-shaped in plan, with walls and balconies facing Northern Boulevard and other streets at a slight angle. The ground level would contain commercial space, and underground parking would be provided for about 300 cars. The exterior would show no trace of the Thomas Lamb theater currently on the site. Atmospheric theaters closely followed the designs of planetariums and were first designed by Austrian-born theater architect John Eberson in 1923. The first was the now-demolished Majestic Theater in Houston (1923), where the auditorium ceiling simulated the night skies, with hidden machinery that projected "clouds" moving across the plaster ceiling, painted deep blue with star-like electric lights, with walls often built up in stages for the effect of garden follies. Reproduced around the country in a variety of architectural styles, these theaters recognizably featured an open, lit evening sky with stars and clouds, and walls built up, symmetrically, as stage sets suggesting a foreign setting. Eberson wrote that, "We visualize and dream a magnificent amphitheater, an Italian garden, a Persian Court, a Spanish patio, or a mystic Egyptian templeyard, all canopied by a soft moonlit sky." Although Eberson was the originator of this type, Lamb, already the most prolific movie palace architect, became well associated with this type of movie palace, especially in New York. A survey of the country's movie palaces cites 27 major New York examples. Seven of these were designed as "atmospherics" out of 34 listed from across the country: the RKO Keith's, the now-demolished Triboro in Astoria, Queens, the Valencia in Jamaica, Queens, the now-demolished Loew's 72nd Street (in Manhattan), Pitkin in Brownsville, Brooklyn (now retail), the Paradise in the Bronx (now a church), and the Brooklyn Paramount (now a school gymnasium). In its heyday, the RKO Keith’s attracted performers such as Judy Garland, Mae West, Bob Hope, Jack Benny, and the Marx Brothers. Xinyuan's application notes that precedents for temporary removal and installation of ornamental plasterwork include the Lyric, Apollo, Selwyn (also known as the American Airlines and the Roundabout), and Eltinge (also known as the Empire and AMC 25) theaters in Times Square. Other Xinyuan projects include The Oosten in Williamsburg and a 100-unit development in Hell’s Kitchen. JK Equities was the seller of the RKO Keith’s. The hearing on the theater is scheduled to start around 9:30 a.m. at 1 Centre Street, ninth floor.  If the project is approved, according to the application, the developers would remove the ornamental plasterwork and other protected material this spring and start tearing down the surrounding structure in the fall. Their schedule calls for construction of the residential tower to begin in the spring of 2018 and be complete by the spring of 2020. For more details on the hearing, see the LPC's web page here.
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Theaters nationwide dim lights in honor of architect Hugh Hardy, who passed away last week

Theaters in New York City and around the country dimmed their marquee lights last night in honor of Hugh Hardy, the architect who passed away this month at age 84. Hardy helped restore many of New York’s best-known theaters, including Radio City Music Hall, the New Amsterdam, the New Victory, and the Majestic Theater. He died, ironically, after suffering a fall on March 15 while on the way to see a dance performance at one of the theaters he worked on, the Joyce. He died two days later and, according to his office, there was no funeral service. The tribute was organized by the Joyce Theater Foundation, operator of the Joyce Theater at 175 Eighth Avenue. “We at The Joyce, one of the many theaters that Hugh designed, are working to organize a tribute to Hugh, who gave so much to the arts, culture, and architecture communities here in New York and beyond,” executive director Linda Shelton wrote to theater operators nationwide. “Hugh loved the marquee of the Joyce and we think it would be a fitting tribute to simultaneously dim the lights of the marquees of all the theaters that Hugh designed,” Shelton continued. “We will dim the lights of the Joyce marquee on Wednesday evening, March 22, at 7:30 p.m. Eastern Time for one full minute. We hope that Hugh’s other theaters will dim their marquee lights at the same time.” According to Caroline Shadle, programmatic assistant at the Joyce, 19 theaters agreed to participate in some way, out of about 30 U. S. theaters that were contacted. “Some of the theaters don’t have marquees, but they said they will dim their lobby lights or participate in some other way,” she said. In Baltimore, the Hippodrome didn’t have a performance on Wednesday, so the operators turned the marquee lights on for a minute, not off. The participating theaters, which show the scope of Hardy’s work, included:
  • The Joyce Theater (New York, NY)
  • Brooklyn Academy of Music (New York, NY)
  • Lincoln Center Theater (New York, NY)
  • Theatre Row (New York, NY)
  • New Amsterdam Theatre (New York, NY)
  • National Dance Institute (New York, NY)
  • Theatre for a New Audience (New York, NY)
  • Dance Theatre of Harlem (New York, NY)
  • Radio City Music Hall (New York, NY)
  • The New Victory Theater (New York, NY)
  • Signature Theatre (New York, NY)
  • Performing Arts Center at Purchase College (Purchase, NY)
  • Royden B. Davis Performing Arts Center, Georgetown University (Washington, D.C.)
  • The Glimmerglass Festival (Cooperstown, NY)
  • Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center (Great Barrington, MA)
  • Hippodrome Theatre at the France
  • Merrick Performing Arts Center (Baltimore, MD)
  • Wilma Theater (Philadelphia, PA)
  • Two River Theater (Red Bank, NJ)
  • Orchestra Hall (Minneapolis, MN)