Posts tagged with "The Living":

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Subculture show converts Storefront for Art and Architecture into living lab

Subculture: Microbial Metrics and the Multi-Species City is the new exhibition that will be held at New York City’s Storefront for Art and Architecture starting Tuesday, September 18. The exhibition will showcase the collaborative work of innovative scientists and designers, including Kevin Slavin, Elizabeth Hénaff, The Living, and Evan Eisman Company, who have merged biology, data science, and material science with design to provide viewers with a better understanding of the city's microscopic world. The gallery space will be transformed into an active genetic sequencing lab that will collect, extract, and analyze the microbes that dwell in our surrounding environment. Although the exhibition will center on fungi, bacteria, and other unspecified germs—facets of New York’s street life that most city-dwellers try to avoid like the plague—Subculture will force its visitors to come face to face with these microbes to better understand the ecologies and identities of the city’s buildings and spaces. Rather than focus on a single artist or architect, the exhibition highlights common goals that have linked the collaborators' careers over the past decade, including their commitment to reinterpreting the biological environment and providing insight into the future of design. These seemingly complex goals and ideas—represented through the installation in the gallery space, along with the analysis of various sites across the city such as rooftops, subway stations, and waterways—will be presented in a detailed and explicit manner within three distinct zones of the gallery. As one moves through the exhibition, they will find that each space has been dedicated to a specific process or idea, starting with the facade of the Storefront—an introductory area that will highlight the existence of microbial species in urban environments. The facade of the Storefront, like the remainder of the gallery space, is both modern and minimalistic, with its use of fine lines, colorless walls, and rotating geometric panels that intend to blur the border between the gallery and the street. Assembled on the doors of the facade will be a series of wood tiles that have been deliberately eroded to form a pattern of diverse microclimates. Throughout the duration of the exhibition, each tile will accumulate and host entire civilizations of microbes, which will later be extracted and analyzed within the gallery’s genetic laboratory. After exploring the concepts, images, and models on display at Subculture, visitors should come away with a better understanding of the goals of environmental architecture and design. The exhibit also urges its visitors to shun their common preferences for cleanliness and sterility, and provoke them to think of buildings as complex, evolving, and living organisms. Whether you are a scientist, architect, inquisitive scholar, or simply a resident of New York City, Subculture could help you discover the importance and presence of the bacterial diversity that dominates our urban lives.
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2017 Best of Design Awards for Green – Civic

2017 Best of Design Awards for Green – Civic: Princeton University Embodied Computation Lab Architect: The Living Location: Princeton, New Jersey This simple but forward-thinking lab will host research on the future of buildings. Designed to evolve over time, the project features components and systems that can be swapped and upgraded—students and faculty will continually rewrite and adapt the structure. The Princeton University Embodied Computation Lab is a model for new sustainability and low-carbon features, including extremely low embodied energy through a glulam structure and envelope made of local timber. It is the first engineered wood building in North America with a five-ton gantry crane. The radiant floor uses waste condensate from the building next door, with no additional energy required. The building envelope is made of reclaimed New York City scaffolding boards that otherwise would have ended up in a landfill. The facade involves the use of custom algorithms trained to detect knots in wood—bringing the power of machine-learning technology to the physical world. “A lot is achieved in a relatively small built space.  The idea of an open source building with swappable components made from reused or repurposed materials with simple yet thoughtful detailing is pretty extraordinary.” —Nathaniel Stanton, principal, Craft Engineer Studio (juror) Architect of Record: NK Architects Structural Engineers: Buro Happold General Contractor: Epic Glulam Manufacturer: Structural Wood Systems Ceiling Fans: Big Ass Fans   Honorable Mention  Project Name: United States Courthouse, Los Angeles Architecture, Structural Engineering, Interior Design, Graphics: Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP Location: Los Angeles
United States Courthouse, Los Angeles (Bruce Damonte)New United States Courthouse meets an energy target of 35k BTU/GSF annual consumption through a variety of sustainable design features. The most visible sustainable design feature is the facade—a solution that gracefully responds to the solar orientation of the site as well as principles of classic, federal architecture. Owner: General Services Administration General Contractor: Clark Construction Group Facade Contractor: Benson Industries LLC Blast Engineering: Applied Research Associates Inc. Mechanical and Electrical Engineering: Syska Hennessy Group Inc
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These urban design projects top the AIANY’s 2015 Design Awards

A jury of architects, landscape architects, critics, educators, and planners has named the 35 winning projects of this year's AIA New York Chapter Design Awards. "Each winning project, granted either an 'Honor' or 'Merit' award, was chosen for its design quality, response to its context and community, program resolution, innovation, thoughtfulness, and technique," the AIA said in a statement. "Submitted projects had to be completed by members of the AIA New York Chapter, architects/designers practicing in New York, or be New York projects designed by architects/designers based elsewhere." Take a look at the winning teams in the projects and urban design categories below. Honor Awards Ennead Architects Rethinking Refugee Communities
From the architects: "Can refugee settlements be a benefit to the host community rather than a burden? How can shared resources be employed to benefit both populations as well as foster a more sustainable solution? These questions arise when rethinking a new type of refugee settlement design process that fosters shared infrastructure, resources and economic exchange between incoming refugees and local residents. By creating spatial opportunities for the two populations to develop a beneficial relationship, refugee settlements can enrich the opportunities available to refugees creating more sustainable solutions during the refugees’ displacement."
The Living Hy-Fi Queens, NY
From the architects: "Hy-Fi offers a captivating physical environment and a new paradigm for sustainable architecture. In 2014, we tested and refined a new low-energy building material, manufactured 10,000 compostable bricks, constructed a 13-meter-tall tower, hosted public cultural events for three months, disassembled the structure, composted the bricks, and returned the resulting soil to local community gardens. This successful experiment offers many possibilities for future construction."
MERIT AWARDS BIG – Bjarke Ingels Group Project: Smithsonian Institution South Mall Campus Master Plan Location: Washington, DC CDR Studio Governor's Cup Pavilion New York, NY OBRA Architects Church in the Arctic Tana Bru, Norway raad The Lowline New York, NY
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Yeezus! What a Jury! The Living and The Dead at MoMA PS1’s Young Architects Program

The MoMA PS 1 jury process that selected the “100 percent organic pavilion Hy-Fi” for its 2014 pavilion may have been a contentious group. The museum announced last month that David Benjamin, the principal of Brooklyn-based firm The Living, would design the temporary structure. But several sources have told Eavesdrop that one of the short listed firms (Collective-LOK, PARA-Project, WOJR, over,under, Fake Industries Architectural Agonism, LAMAS, Pita + Bloom) was in fact told that it—not Benjamin—had won the design competition. The architects were told to come to a PS 1 meeting to discuss moving forward as the winner, but after waiting for an hour they were told that a member of the jury was not there and the meeting could not take place. They waited patiently for another hour until they were asked to go home and wait—“don’t call us, we’ll call you.” Later that week, a MoMA official contacted the firm and told them that, actually, Benjamin and his firm had been selected as the winner of the coveted summer pavilion—oops, sorry. It was, of course, a devastating blow. So devastating that the architects are not willing to talk about the episode. So MoMA will go forward with the “organic” brick pavilion. Benjamin employer Columbia University reported in its May 15 GSAPP newsletter that “Kanye West and GSAPP faculty member David Benjamin (M.Arch ‘05) are working on a ‘strictly confidential’ project.” Though other sources claim that this project involves a “new type of movie theater and 3D entertainment experience,” can we expect Benjamin’s partner to take part in PS 1’s usually rollicking summer party to inaugurate the pavilion?
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Architectural League Names 2014 Emerging Voices

Today, the Architectural League of New York revealed its selections for the 2014 class of Emerging Voices, a distinction that honors young firms "with distinct design voices and the potential to influence the disciplines of architecture, landscape design, and urbanism." This year's pool of winners demonstrated an entrepreneurial spirit, according to the League, "pursuing alternate forms of practice, often writing their own programs or serving as their own clients." Winners are selected by a jury from a pool of invited firms. This year's international group of eight includes The Living (which just this week was also named winner of MoMA PS 1's Young Architects Program), Surfacedesign, SITU Studio, Ants of the Prairie, Estudio Macías Peredo, Rael San Fratello, TALLER |MauricioRocha+GabrielaCarrillo|, and Williamson Chong Architects. A lecture series is planned in March where each firm will present their work and design philosophy. Betsy Williamson, Shane Williamson, and Donald Chong Williamson Chong Architects Toronto According to the League:
“Context, materials research, economies of construction, building performance, and client-based collaboration” all shape the design approach of Williamson Chong Architects. Their work ranges in scale from furniture to master planning, including the House in Frogs Hollow and the Abby Gardens Food Community master plan.
David Benjamin The Living New York According to the League:
New Yorkʼs The Living explores – through installations such as Mussel Choir, exhibited at the Venice Biennale, and the NYCEDC project EcoPark – “how new technologies come to life in the built environment.” The Living was just named as the winner of the MoMA/PS1 Young Architects Program.
Geoff di Girolamo, James Lord, and Roderick Wyllie Surfacedesign San Francisco According to the League:
The landscape architecture and urban design practice Surface Design, Inc. focuses on creating landscapes that emphasize “personal histories and connections between culture and natural environment” with projects ranging in scale from domestic projects, to San Franciscoʼs Golden Gate Bridge Plaza, to Stonesfields Quarry Park in Auckland, New Zealand.
Basar Girit, Aleksey Lukyanov-Cherny, Wes Rozen, and Bradley Samuels SITU Studio Brooklyn According to the League:
The firmʼs Brooklyn-based studio, divided between design and fabrication spaces, enables their goal to “leverage fabrication efficiencies, material re-use, flexible assemblies, and community involvement to create spaces that engage in living relationships with the urban context.” Projects have included the ReOrder installation in the Brooklyn Museum Great Hall; Heartwalk, installed in Times Square; and mapping and analysis projects.
Joyce Hwang Ants of the Prairie Buffalo, NY According to the League:
Ants of the Prairie is an arts and research practice “dedicated to developing creative approaches in confronting the pleasures and horrors of our contemporary ecologies,” as seen in work such as Bat Cave and Bat Cloud and the currently under construction bird and bat Habitat Wall.
Salvador Macías Corona and Magui Peredo Arenas Estudio Macías Peredo Guadalajara, Mexico According to the League:
Estudio Macías Peredo, acknowledging “the understanding of our regional situation (geographically and socio-culturally), where [a] craftsman is part of the building process,” embraces ideas of critical regionalism, as explored in the residences Casa Atlas and Casa Arenas.
Ronald Rael and Virginia San Fratello Rael San Fratello Oakland, CA According to the League:
Rael San Fratello shies away from working within a set philosophy, trying rather “not to define, but rather to constantly redefine ourselves” with projects, ranging from the art installation Prada Marfa to their winning entry in the Sukkah City competition, “Sukkah of the Signs, aka the Homeless House,” that “try to do the most with the least.”
Mauricio Rocha Iturbide and Gabriela Carrillo Valadez TALLER |MauricioRocha+GabrielaCarrillo| Mexico City According to the League:
TALLER IMauricioRocha+GabrielaCarrilloI focuses on “the importance of the vernacular, craftsmanship, sustainability, and socially-responsible design” in projects such as Plastic Arts School, Universidad Autónoma Benito Juárez de Oaxaca and the Hall for the Visually Impaired, Ciudadela.
The League's Emerging Voices lecture series will take place at the Scholastic Auditorium located at 557 Broadway, New York. For exact dates and ticket information, visit the League's website. The 2014 jury included Fred Bernstein, Paul Lewis, Kate Orff, Thomas Phifer, Annabelle Selldorf, and Adam Yarinsky. Previous Emerging Voices winners include Jeanne Gang, Morphosis, Steven Holl, Tod Williams, Deborah Berke, Brad Cloepfil, Michael Maltzan, and many others.
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EVENT> January 24: New Practices Finale with The Living + Google

TheLiving-LivingLight(1) Framed:Interfaces, Narratives, and the Convergence of Architectural and Internet Technologies Thursday, January 24 6:00pm-8:00pm AIA New Practices New York 29 Ninth Avenue/Axor NYC Showroom The Living, which sounds like an indie band but is actually one of the 2012 AIA New Practices New York winners, will conclude this year's New Practices conversation series with a bang. The firm has gained recognition for developing futuristic forms through new technologies and prototyping, and for "Framed: Interfaces, Narratives, and the Convergence of Architectural and Internet Technologies" The Living's David Benjamin, who also directs the Living Architecture Lab at Columbia's GSAPP, will sit down with Jonathan Lee, a designer at Google UXI, that company's design think tank. Following what promises to be a lively presentation and conversation, a reception will celebrate the conclusion of the New Practices series. The January 24 event, which is co-hosted by The Architect's Newspaper, will be held at Axor's NYC showroom. Free of charge with AIA CES credits provided. RSVP here.
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AIANY Names Seven Young Firms among 2012 New Practices

Seven young and creative architecture firms were named as recipients of AIANY's New Practices New York awards for 2012. Now in its fourth iteration, the biennial award established in 2006 and sponsored by Hansgrohe "honors firms that have utilized unique and innovative strategies, both for the projects they undertake and for the practices they have established." This year's New Practices honorees are SLO Architecture, Holler Architecture, Abruzzo Bodziak Architects, Marc Fornes and the Very Many, Formless, The Living, and Christian Wassmann. Winners will be featured in an exhibition opening June 14 at the Center for Architecture, participation in the AIA national convention, and, of course, a free subscription to The Architect's Newspaper (the competion's media sponsor). Abruzzo Bodziak Architects From the jury: "An inspiring—and very consistent—portfolio; a serious and mature practice for its relatively young age. Good dialogue between ideas, practice, architecture, client, builder, and consultants." Firm web site. Holler Architecture From the jury: "It was refreshing to see the 'systems approach' to sustainability that was evident in their work. The architects were careful to treat the complex processes with rigor and to leverage them to inform their innovative design propositions. Firm web site. formlessfinder (Garret Ricciardi and Julian Rose) From the jury: "John Cage once said that an experimental act is one where the outcome is not known in advance. For Garret and Julian, matter and ideas are one. The perform material experiments not with a specific outcome in mid, but in an authentic spirit of exploration—sometimes ugly, often surprising, the results are materially rich and experientially suggestive." Firm web site. Marc Fornes & The Very Many From the jury: "Marc Fornes designs and builds meticulous constructions that are formally intricate, tactile, and experientially complex. The one and the many have never been so many. He is a highly sophisticated scripter and user of complex software but he is also a canny, hand’s on maker of things, and it is this interplay between the virtual and the real that makes his work so compelling." Firm web site. The Living From the jury: "We loved the blend of invention, humor, and the deep conviction that the work done should make the world a better place. The communication of their research is done in ways that are elegant and absolutely visceral." Firm web site. SLO Architecture From the jury: "The 3 projects presented in this portfolio—Bronx River Crossing, Bushkill Overflow, and Harvest Dome—display a compelling and unified vision of architectural research. In their selection of what to focus on, who to work for and how to bring an architectural perspective to regional concerns they take seriously their claim to "explore how nature can transcend preconceived boundaries to trace new trajectories of urban life." Their formal creations-developed in dialog with users and the public- all bring a light, sensitive touch to their sites and show promise that SLO can themselves transcend preconceived boundaries of community architecture." Firm web site. Christian Wassmann From the jury: "Although we all had difficulty in navigating through the folding portfolio, when we did we found a coherent sense of exploration. Ideas were pursued at various scales and through various media and techniques—there is a clear sense that a true and thoughtful practice is in formation." Firm web site.   Click on a thumbnail to launch slideshow: