Posts tagged with "the High Line":

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New images revealed of model unit in Zaha Hadid’s 520 West 28th Street

As Zaha Hadid Architects (ZHA) wraps up work on 520 West 28th Street, the firm’s first permanent project in New York, The Architect’s Newspaper (AN) got an early look at the interiors of the striking new building. Located directly adjacent the High Line, the building occupies a prominent place in the burgeoning area around Hudson Yards. AN interviewed West Chin of New York City–based West Chin Architects, Designers, & Decorators (WCA) about his experience designing one of the 39-unit building's model apartments, and how his team approached the eccentricities of this ZHA design. AN: Zaha Hadid's design for the building conveys a powerful aesthetic; what was your overall approach to design a unit in such a distinct building? West Chin: We have always been big fans of Zaha Hadid's work, and are honored to be part of such a monumental project. We started our process by imagining what type of client would be inspired to own a piece of this iconic building resting on the High Line. We pictured a sophisticated design-conscious bachelor or stylish couple, and we created a space that would nurture their love of design. Were there any unforeseen challenges once you started working on the project? We signed onto the project after seeing the rendering of Zaha’s vision and enjoyed seeing it come to life. Raw conditions of a site during the installation phase can sometimes be challenging but the team worked together with the construction crew to bring it all together. Your firm is known best perhaps for its commitment to a minimal, functional style. How does that ethos make its way into this design? Zaha has captured the edginess of New York with her dynamic design and sculptural architectural elements. WCA has embraced these foundations and added to that a soft sensitivity and ease that allows the home to become a haven from the fast-paced lifestyle that many New Yorkers live. We took inspiration from some of the dark earthy tones found in the architectural materials in New York, and the natural colors you might see on the High Line. The custom Porro closets and storage systems we designed for the space fit seamlessly into the shell provided and offered specific places to store and display just the right amount of accessories for a personal touch. There is also a good amount of art and sculpture; did your firm select these pieces? What do you think they add to the design? Yes, we curated the art, accessories, and the furnishings to create not just a beautiful space but also style that reflects the design-consciousness and persona of its potential inhabitant, an admirer of art, design, and architecture.  We were fortunate to have just returned from Art Basel when we were working on the styling for the project. This trip came in very handy in the art selection process. What are your takeaways as a designer after working in this architecture? The building evokes the sleek details of a sexy Ferrari, and we like to think that we have provided the custom details that make the car your own, comforts and all. The highly customizable closets and modular storage systems are tailored to fit the space as well as the lifestyle of its inhabitants, while the furniture, lighting, accessories, and art are the luxurious accompaniments that complete the package. Our warm, modern style combined with the bold moments captured in Zaha Hadid's imaginative creation, both inside and out, come together to create an inviting space. For more on 520 W. 28th, see its website here. For a full list of products in Chin's design, see the PDF here.
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Lisson Gallery to open under the High Line

The much anticipated Lisson Gallery is set to open in New York next month on 504 West 24th Street underneath the High Line. The new exhibition space will be the gallery's fourth and first outside of Europe, with currently two in London and one in Milan. Designed by New York practices studioMDA and Studio Christian Wassmann, both whom have an established pedigree in gallery design, the space is formed around the foundations of the pre-High Line. In keeping with the minimalist aesthetic of the gallery's London counterparts, polished concrete is used throughout the building. An exposed all-white concrete facade will look out onto West 24th Street. A more private area for office and art handling will be housed on the building's south side. The new gallery will cover 8,500 square feet, comprising 4,500 square feet as gallery space, meanwhile 4,000 square feet will be used for the aforementioned offices, viewing spaces and storage. For the inaugural exhibition, the gallery will showcase the recent paintings of Cuban-born artist Carmen Herrera. This will last from May 3 - 18 June, 2016 and be followed by the first solo exhibition in the United States by filmmaker and artist John Akomfrah (1 July –12 August); a new installation by Ryan Gander (16 September –15 October); and an exhibition of new work by Ai Weiwei (5 November –16 December 2016). Under the supervision of Nicholas Logsdail, Lisson Gallery and curatorial support of Greg Hilty in London, the Lisson Gallery New York will seek to develop the international profile of its hosted artists, exhibiting those who have not shown in New York recently or at all.  
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As starchitect-designed condos pop-up along the High Line, Chelsea’s art galleries look for a new home

As rents go up in a city succumbing to gentrification, the few remaining art galleries in Manhattan's Chelsea neighborhood have either left or are looking set to leave. This however, is nothing new for the art galleries of New York, according to Stuart Siegel, senior vice president at real-estate broker CBRE Group who specializes in Chelsea. The galleries have been been victims of their own success before. "The galleries put Chelsea on the map. Then the world followed them," Siegel told Crain's. Now, high-end development along the High Line is responsible for chasing many galleries away. Crain's went on to note that only "high-end emporiums" such as Gagosian Gallery, Gladstone Gallery, and David Zwirner—all of which own their own buildings—remain. They have learned the lessons of the past when art galleries previously "revitalized" Soho, only to be forced out due to increasing rent prices. The hike has even affected Jeff Koons, the world’s most expensive living artist at auction according to Crain's. Koons plans to move out within the next two years. Developments from Zaha Hadid, Foster+PartnersFrank Gehry, and others have popped up all along the High Line, and will only further the gentrification of the area as rent prices continue to increase. Troy McMullen at the Financial Times commented that "at present there are more than 20 new developments – with more than 2,700 new units – planned either near, alongside or under the High Line, according to New York City’s Department of Buildings, making this narrow, 2.3km-long strip of land one of the highest concentrations of new architecture and property development in the US."
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Pictorial> Take a walk along New York City’s starchitect-lined High Line

If you haven't been up on the High Line recently, or perhaps ever–looking at you Mayor de Blasio–then you've been missing out on some big new projects from architecture's biggest names–we're talking about your Hadid’s, your Foster’s, your Piano’s, and your Kohn Pedersen Fox’s. AN recently took a stroll along the 'ole rail line to see the progress on Renzo Piano’s nearly-completed Whitney Museum, the quickly-rising Hudson Yards, and all the fancy condos rising in between. Take a look at the gallery below to see all that's been happening on the park that every city wants to recreate.
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New York City Zoning Board Burns Studio Gang’s “Solar Carve” Tower Along the High Line

Chicago’s Studio Gang Architects announced plans for their New York debut in late 2012. The proposed building, located near the High Line along 10th Avenue between 13th and 14th streets, features a serrated edge that maximizes daylight on the elevated park next door—Jeanne Gang called it “solar carving.” But the legal path to realizing that faceted glass facade had some unexpected kinks of its own. The Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation (GVSHP) was “thrilled to report” that the building’s developer withdrew their application for a zoning variance for the building. At 213 feet tall, the tower would have been 34 percent larger than current zoning allows. After a few appearances before the Board of Standards and Appeals, the project's land use attorney told the New York Observer that the zoning request had fallen flat. The developer, William Gottlieb Real Estate, is apparently moving forward with a modified application, but for now the project remains blocked. The High Line intersects the site, which is currently an empty meatpacking plant. Gang’s design placed the tower near the Hudson River, abutting the High Line. GVSHP contested the developer’s position that sandy soils and the High Line’s proximity constituted a “hardship” worthy of a zoning variance. The 186,700-square-foot office tower was planned to open in 2015. If a revised application seeks different setbacks, the “Solar Carve” tower might meet less resistance from neighborhood groups. “We have no objections to the proposed development setting back differently than the zoning requires, as this would have no negative impact upon the surrounding neighborhood,” wrote GVSHP’s executive director, Andrew Berman. “Increasing the bulk of the proposed development, however, would have such a negative impact.”