Posts tagged with "The DryLine":

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New York City to receive $176 million in federal funding for East Side coastal resiliency project

New York City will receive $176 million in federal funding for disaster recovery. The funding would be put towards a section of the project extending from the northern portion of Battery Park City to Montgomery Street on the Lower East Side. The money is part of $181 million in funding for recovery projects in New York and New Jersey. The funds came from the National Disaster Resilience Competition, a U.S. Department Housing and Urban Development–sponsored competition to rebuild communities affected by natural disasters, The New York Times reports. The BIG–designed East Side Coastal Resiliency Project (scaled down, but known in former incarnations as the DryLine or the BIG U) calls for sea walls, retractable flood barriers, and grass berms that would double as riverside recreation areas, opening up the waterfront to create a shoreline comparable to the recreation-rich shores of Manhattan's West Side. The East Side Coastal Resiliency Project arose from Rebuild by Design, a 2014 competition to solicit ideas for six large-scale flood protection and resiliency measures in the tristate area. Rebuild by Design awarded New York City $335 million in federal funds for the East 23rd Street to Montgomery Street section. Mayor de Blasio has committed $100 million in capital funding to the project already.
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Eavesdrop> The BIG in Big Apple: Rumors say Bjarke Ingels planning several more New York City towers

Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) is off the rails lately, netting commission after commission. Five years ago, BIG set up shop stateside to supervise W57, the "courtscraper" along the West Side Highway—the firm's first New York City project. They have since collected an impressive portfolio of planned projects, and AN hears there's more on the way. It is almost unreal to hear rumors about another possible tower in Tribeca, a second westside project near the High Line, and an Upper East Side supertall tower in the pipeline. BIG could have seven large projects that would come to fruition in the next decade or so. Talk about a BIG Apple! W57, meanwhile, is well under construction. At 126th Street, BIG's project in Harlem (now in design development) would cantilever over Gotham Plaza on 125th Street. The building allegedly contains mostly studios and one-bedrooms, and there are approximately 233 total units—47 of these will be affordable. The project formerly known as the Dryline or "BIG U" is being implemented, with modifications, as the East Side Coastal Resiliency Project (ESCRP). BIG U called for ten unbroken miles of flood protection in Manhattan, from West 57th Street, looping south to the Battery and up the East River to 42nd Street. When AN checked in on the project this October, BIG U was scaled back due to funding constraints. The $335 million ESCRP will create retractable flood barriers, berms, and floodwalls in the East River from Montgomery Street to East 23rd Street. Construction is slated to begin in 2017. BIG was one of the last starchitecture firms to get a High Line commission. Good things come to those who wait: the two tower HZF High Line project, at Eleventh Avenue and 17th Street, feature 300 apartments (most with two and three bedrooms), 50,00 square feet of ground floor retail, and a three-level, 150,000-square-foot hotel. The 38 story (402 feet) western tower will its 28 story (302 feet) sibling tower to the east. The towers are expected to be complete by 2018. The stepped, 1,340-foot-tall Two World Trade Center is in design development. When it opens in 2020, it will make a dramatic impact on the skyline from all angles. If King Kong decides to terrorize Manhattan again, he'll have the perfect building to climb.
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These 2015 Holcim Award winners showcase the latest in sustainable design

The Holcim Foundation has announced the three winners in its Global Holcim Awards for Sustainable Construction. The international competition, now in its fourth year, celebrates projects that "deliver tangible benefits to local communities." This year, the winners will collect a total $350,000 between them, and each walk away with a trophy. Take a look at the gold, bronze, and silver winners below. Gold Prize Articulate Site, Colombia By Mario Fernando Camargo Gómez and Luis Orlando Tombé Hurtado of Colectivo 720 From the architects:
This project for a public park centers on creating spaces around and above a series of water reservoirs. Architectural form takes inspiration from the site’s history, surrounding topography, and structure of the existing tanks and pools, resulting in an intervention with minimal environmental impact. Special attention is given to water management, using recycling technologies involving rainwater and grey water harvesting through simple systems for irrigation of the park.
Silver Prize Post-War Collective, Sri Lanka By Milinda Pathiraja and Ganga Ratnayake of Robust Architecture Workshop From the architects:
With the aim of reintegrating former soldiers into post-civil war society, young men from underprivileged backgrounds are trained in building techniques through their involvement in the construction of public buildings – such as this Community Library. The slender building sits lightly in the landscape and wraps around an inner courtyard, taking full advantage of cross ventilation and daylighting. Rammed-earth walls and recycled materials reduce the building’s ecological footprint.
Bronze Prize The Dryline, New York City  By BIG, One Architecture, and Starr Whitehouse Landscape Architects and Planners From the architects:
The Dryline (or BIG U) project addresses the vulnerability of New York City to coastal flooding and proposes a protective ribbon in Southern Manhattan. The master plan uses a raised berm to create a sequence of public spaces along the raised bank at the water’s edge. The infrastructural barrier incorporates a range of neighborhood functions and as a result offers multiple design opportunities, fostering local commercial, recreational, and cultural activities.
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These urban design projects top the AIANY’s 2015 Design Awards

A jury of architects, landscape architects, critics, educators, and planners has named the 35 winning projects of this year's AIA New York Chapter Design Awards. "Each winning project, granted either an 'Honor' or 'Merit' award, was chosen for its design quality, response to its context and community, program resolution, innovation, thoughtfulness, and technique," the AIA said in a statement. "Submitted projects had to be completed by members of the AIA New York Chapter, architects/designers practicing in New York, or be New York projects designed by architects/designers based elsewhere." Take a look at the winning teams in the projects and urban design categories below. Honor Awards Ennead Architects Rethinking Refugee Communities
From the architects: "Can refugee settlements be a benefit to the host community rather than a burden? How can shared resources be employed to benefit both populations as well as foster a more sustainable solution? These questions arise when rethinking a new type of refugee settlement design process that fosters shared infrastructure, resources and economic exchange between incoming refugees and local residents. By creating spatial opportunities for the two populations to develop a beneficial relationship, refugee settlements can enrich the opportunities available to refugees creating more sustainable solutions during the refugees’ displacement."
The Living Hy-Fi Queens, NY
From the architects: "Hy-Fi offers a captivating physical environment and a new paradigm for sustainable architecture. In 2014, we tested and refined a new low-energy building material, manufactured 10,000 compostable bricks, constructed a 13-meter-tall tower, hosted public cultural events for three months, disassembled the structure, composted the bricks, and returned the resulting soil to local community gardens. This successful experiment offers many possibilities for future construction."
MERIT AWARDS BIG – Bjarke Ingels Group Project: Smithsonian Institution South Mall Campus Master Plan Location: Washington, DC CDR Studio Governor's Cup Pavilion New York, NY OBRA Architects Church in the Arctic Tana Bru, Norway raad The Lowline New York, NY
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Video> Watch Bjarke Ingels’ Manhattan “Dry Line” form before your eyes

The Bjarke Ingels Group's plan to wrap Lower Manhattan in a landscape berm to keep floodwaters at bay was definitely one of the most architecturally interesting proposals to come from Rebuild By Design, the Department of Housing and Urban Development’s competition to boost resiliency in a post-Sandy world. Last June, the plan—known as "The BIG U" or "The Dry Line"—also became the competitions's biggest winner. To implement BIG's ambitious vision, New York City was allocated $335 million, significantly more money than what was provided for the other five winners. Last fall, Daniel Zarrilli, the director of New York City’s Office of Recovery & Resiliency, told AN that the de Blasio administration was “absolutely committed” to realizing the plan, but that the end result wouldn't necessarily look like what we saw in the renderings. For one, the money would not be spent on the entire circuit, but rather one section of it on the Lower East Side. As the city continues taking steps toward make this plan a reality, a production company called Squint/Opera has released a pretty cool short film about BIG's grand vision. The piece is part of the firm's current exhibition HOT TO COLD at the National Building Museum in Washington, D.C. If you can't make it to D.C. for the exhibition, we've got you covered and have posted the video above.