Posts tagged with "Textiles":

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London-based researcher brings architecture to life—with billions of bacteria

Bacteria often evoke a destructive image, with connotations of decay and illness. But like all living communities, as much as they consume, they also create (or, perhaps more accurately, excrete). And it's this creative power that London-based architectural researcher Bastian Beyer is harnessing in his “Column Project.” With designer Daniel Suarez, Beyer has created solid, structural forms from microbe-suffused textiles as a more sustainable, biodegradable alternative to carbon-intensive materials. The project's central innovation is a dual-use apparatus that combines a loom and a so-called bioreactor. Woven jute (tested in many patterns and weights) acts as a host for a whole environment of sprayed-on microorganisms—a microbiome—clinging to the textiles. The introduction of calcium chloride and urea spurs the sporosarcina pasteurii bacteria to action, catalyzing their production of a calcite structure that alters the underlying fibers and solidifies the knit matrix over about three days.These microbiomes are in constant (biological) exchange with their environment which varies in their activity depending on external and internal conditions,” said Beyer, speaking of the ways the environment, bacteria, and material interact. While the textile structure doesn’t have the strength of materials like carbon fiber or fiberglass, it still stands solid and can be used for “spatial dividers, shading features, reinforcement, and potentially even structural roof or wall systems,” according to Beyer. Given its unique biologically-focused design, there’s also the hope that it might be a self-repairing technology. Somewhat cryptically, or poetically, depending on your disposition, Beyer said that “the project can be understood as an architectural mediator of a multi-actor fabrication process, allowing the interdependent inputs from the digital, the microbiological as well as the human body to merge into one co-creating entity.” It collapses distinctions of biology and technology, of craft and natural processes. The project, which won a 2018 Autodesk ACADIA Emerging Research Award, is part of the broader ArcInTex initiative, a European program that supports explorations across the intersections of “architecture, interaction design, and textiles.”
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House of Peroni popup brings Jenny Sabin’s textile tubes down to Earth

The 2018 House of Peroni art popup is now open to the public, and at the preview event on October 18 in Manhattan, guests had the chance to wander through Jenny Sabin Studio’s hanging textile sculptures and snack on sugar sculptures. This year’s installation, LUSTER, which was curated by the nonprofit Art Production Fund, presented a more intimate, and refined, version of Sabin’s 2017 Lumen installation for the MoMA PS1’s Young Architects Program. The exhibition encompasses a bar serving up beers and cocktails from Italian beermaker Peroni, as well as functional seating and tables from Sabin. A woven canopy of photoluminescent materials, reflective textiles, and tubing has been lit with color-changing lights, creating a constantly shifting environment. The cell-like structure of the canopy, strung from supports just below the ceiling, both filters and diffuses sunlight during the day and seems to pulse when lit at night. “Tubes,” some defined and others deflated, hang down from the installation and encourage visitors to mingle around and touch them. Depending on the lighting, the effect varies from being inside of a cave, to drinking beer in a dense forest surrounded by tree trunks. Even the spool stools were given an update, their solid cores replaced with spindly, rebar-like supports. The same basic form of the stools was also elongated to form components of the central bar and taller tables. LUSTER was fabricated under very different constraints than the courtyard condition of Lumen. In a discussion at the House of Peroni with GSAPP’s Christoph Kumpusch, Sabin discussed the technical challenges of bringing such an installation to an enclosed space and designing it to travel. After New York, Peroni will bring LUSTER to Los Angeles, Miami, and Washington D.C. The entire canopy zips up for easy transport, and everything was built to fit the specific site. Kumpusch and Sabin also touched on the way that LUSTER openly presents boundary conditions and exposed edges, as well as how the fluid nature of fabric works as an analogy for gender. In terms of the craft itself, Sabin was quick to point out the storied history of textiles and their tangled history with technology—the first punch cards were developed to guide looms, which evolved into the calculator, mainframes, and more, paving the way for modern computing. Also present at House of Peroni 2018 was Glass Garden Lost & Found: Of Healing & Knowledge, an exhibition of carved sugar flowers from candy artist Maayan Zilberman. Mixing live flowers with candy facsimiles, Zilberman’s Peroni installation references the Orto botanico di Padova garden in Padula, Italy, a garden famously known for its collection of both medicinal and poisonous plants. The live flowers take on the healing, medicinal role, while the sugar flowers represent the deadly, artificial constructs created from human knowledge. House of Peroni 2018 will run through October 20 in New York, and then move Los Angeles on November 8, Miami on November 14, and end in Washington D.C. on November 28. Tickets and more information can be found on the House of Peroni website.

ARCHITECT@WORK – Canada – Where A+D meets INNOVATION!

An exclusive tailored event focusing on innovations for Architects, Interior Designers and Specifiers.  With over 500 innovative products and services showcased by manufacturers and distributors. All exhibitors go through a strict selection process with an external juding panel, ensuring the presence of high caliber innovations. FEATURES include: Keynote Speakers, Accredited Seminars, Materials Exhibit, Project Wall, ART Installation. We offer complimentary catering all day to our exhibitors and attendees, so they can focus on networking and conducting business.    
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Meet the honorable mentions in our 2017 Best of Product Awards!

Last week we shared the winning designs from our largest-ever Products Awards across 15 sundry categories, including technology, textiles, HVAC, furniture, facades, and more. Scroll through the slideshow to see the the honorable mentions from each category, evaluated by our team of judges for innovation, aesthetics, performance, and value. You can find our winners and honorable mentions featured in our September issue—out September 6! The Best of Products Awards Jury: James Biber Partner, Biber Architects Olivia Martin Managing Editor, The Architect’s Newspaper William Menking Editor in Chief, The Architect’s Newspaper Patrick Parrish Owner, Patrick Parrish Gallery Tucker Viemeister Founder, Viemeister Industries Pilar Viladas Design writer and editor HONORABLE MENTIONS To view images of all honorable mentions, please click through the slideshow above. Finishes & Surfaces CONDUCT by Flavor Paper PUZZLE by Edward Barber and Jay Osgerby for Mutina for Stone Source Bath LINEA SHOWER BASE by Fiora VERGE WITH WASHBAR by Bradley Corp. Lighting SYMMETRY by Visa Lighting LIFT WITH BIOS by Pinnacle Architectural Lighting Textiles SIGNATURE & LEGACY COLLECTIONS by KnollTextiles SHADE by Chilewich Openings GPX FIREFLOOR SYSTEM by Safti First CURVED by Vitrocsa Technology & Innovation MATTERPORT PRO2 3D CAMERA by Matterport PORTABLE ULTRA SHORT THROW PROJECTOR by Sony Kitchen 4-DOOR FLEX REFRIGERATOR by Samsung VERTICAL BAR BLOCK by Henrybuilt Interior Commercial Furniture GLASSCUBE by CARVART KANSO BENCH by HBF Interior Residential Furniture STEMN SERIES by Fyrn DICHROIC TABLE by Rottet Collection Structural FIRE AND WATER BARRIER TAPE by 3M SCHLUTER-DITRA-HEAT-DUO by Schluter Systems Smart Home Systems EVOLVED MINNEAPOLIS FULL ESCUTCHEON HANDLESET by Baldwin Hardware PANOVISTA MAX by Renson Facades PHOTOVOLTAIC FACADE by Onyx Solar TRIANGULAR RAINSCREEN PANEL by Shildan HVAC EME3625DFL LOUVER by Ruskin AIRFLOW PANEL by Architectural Applications Outdoor Public GO OUTDOORTABLE by Landscape Forms ULURU by Metalco srl/id metalco, Inc. Outdoor Residential CLOUD BENCH by Bend Goods VERTICAL LOUNGER by DEESAWAT  
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Specsheet>Contract textiles that feel like home

The latest contract textiles are evolving toward comfort and calm in a way that makes any space feel like home. Carnegie x Allsteel Allsteel Two major players in the contract world are joining forces to provide ease and increased quality for customers. Allsteel will now offer Carnegie’s PVC-free textiles graded for Allsteel furnishings. Momentum Style Library Contract The collection, comprising 15 designs, is inspired by architecture and nature. This large selection of mixable textiles comes in a variety of materials and textures. With 74 different color options, these complementary prints are a designer’s dream. Azuma KnollTextiles Inspired by traditional Japanese motifs, Azuma, which means east, features four upholstery fabrics named Kabuki, Sashiko, Zen Wave, and Kaya. Kabuki is a bold graphic print that represents the ancient style of Japanese theater, while Zen Wave features a soft print based on classic kimono designs. Each textile is suitable for a variety of uses and is water- soil- stain- and/or bacteria-repellent. Color Compound Luum An example of “Millennial Pink” creeping into the interior design realm, this collection of contract textiles was influenced by architect Luis Barragán’s use of color. The raw textures and simple geometries foster more peaceful environments. Hester Designtex Debuting at NeoCon 2017, Hester is a digitally printed wall covering inspired by Bauhaus masters. Designer Joe Kievitt created an original piece of artwork using masking tape, handmade tools, and a steady drawing hand. The painstaking process resulted in a graphic pattern with a handcrafted quality. Additionally, Hester is certified to SCS Indoor Advantage Gold.

Rigid Vinyl Drywall Corner Bead TRIM-TEX Available in 11 unique shapes to match any interior style. Built strong enough to withstand everyday wear and tear.

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Jenny Sabin wins this year’s MoMA Young Architects Program

Ithaca, New York—based practice Jenny Sabin Studio has won the 18th iteration of The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) and MoMA PS1’s annual Young Architects Program for her project entitled Lumen. The immersive design will be on show starting June 27 at the MoMA PS1 courtyard in Long Island City.

Lumen changes throughout the day, offering shade and shelter from the sun, while also providing artificial illumination after sunset. This is achieved thanks to a tubular lattice canopy comprised of recycled, photo-luminescent, and solar active textiles that absorb, collect, and emit light. The canopy reacts to changes in daylight, absorbing and producing light when necessary. In conjunction with this, fabric stalactites will release mist in response to visitors' proximity, allowing the adaptive structure to respond to changes in heat and the density of the crowd.

Sabin's design will be present for the 20th season of Warm Up, an outdoor music series from MoMA PS1, and will stay on view for the rest of summer. Lumen was chosen as the winner ahead of four other projects. The competition brief called for projects that address environmental issues such as sustainability and recycling. The temporary outdoor installation had to be capable of providing water as well as seating and shade.

"Jenny Sabin's catalytic immersive environment, Lumen, captured the jury's attention for imaginatively merging public and private spaces," said Sean Anderson, associate curator in MoMA’s Department of Architecture and Design. "With innovative construction and design processes borne from a critical merging of technology and nature to precise attention to detail at every scale, Lumen will no doubt engage visitors from day to night in a series of graduated environments and experiences."

Losing out to Sabin were four other finalists. These included Bureau Spectacular (Jimenez Lai and Joanna Grant), Ania Jaworska, Office of III (Sean Canty, Ryan Golenberg, and Stephanie Lin), and SCHAUM/SHIEH (Rosalyne Shieh and Troy Schaum). Despite not being realized, their work will be on show at the MoMA during the summer.

“The Young Architects Program remains one of the most significant opportunities for architects and designers from across the country and world to build radical yet transformative ideas. This year's finalists are no exception; their projects illustrate a diversity of approaches and refreshing ideas for architecture today,” Anderson added.

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Product>Tantalizing textiles

Textiles can add glamour to a space or manage noise pollution. These stylish options are more than just your average fabrics. Coco Couture Carnegie A new addition to Carnegie's Xorel line, the first and only plant-based high-performance interior textile, the couture collection adds a bit of glitz and luxury to the world of hospitality finishes. Nomad Collection Fil Doux Textiles x Clodagh A beautiful collection of upholstery textiles and bed throws for hospitality environments created collaboration with textile designer Clodagh. Inspired by her travels to over 100 countries, the designs include digital prints and woven fabrics in 15 earth-inspired color-ways. The knit throws, seen above, are machine washable. Phaedra Collection Style Library Contract Inspired by an 18th Century English Toile that has been enlarged, Phaedra includes wall coverings, upholstery, and drapery textiles that feature rich velvets and luxurious mattes. Luxe Natural Robert Allen Contract These high-performance textiles are inspired by the maker movement, with patterns that allude to hammered metals, ceramics, and handmade fabrics made of wool, linen, and alpaca. Outline Collection Knoll Textiles A graphic line that explores line work and geometry, Outline includes three upholstery fabrics, three wallcovering products, and two healthcare fabrics that integrate mesh paneling for easy maintenance. Transference Collection Suzanne Tick for Luum Inspired by disruptions in our world, including the glitches we face with technology, Transference includes four new tactile fabrics, including "Disrupt," which is a distorted take on a classic houndstooth pattern.
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The biggest hits from NeoCon

This year's Neocon had a lot of standouts. There were big names with new design collaborations and some up-and-coming designers that really stood out. Here are a few of our favorites from The Mart in Chicago. Brooklyn-based Uhuru made the leap to contract furniture with their very first collection dubbed Essentials Workplace. The brand's dedication to craftsmanship and material sensibility is apparent in the new line that offers industrial-yet-modern pieces that can be incorporated into a variety of different office styles. Allsteel showed a lot of great options for the evolving workplace using fresh and bright textiles, including Parallel (shown above) which is designed with wide arm rests to allow for informal, relaxed meeting places. A manufacturer of innovative glass and resin architectural materials, Sensitile debuted Celeste, a fully customizable backlit canvas. Either LED panel lights, projection light, or daylight can be used to emphasize the the etched glass patterns that appear to be infinite.
    Tarkett debuted a collection of luxury vinyl tile collections from a group of very impressive designers including Suzanne Tick, 2X4, D.B. Kim, K&Co, and Sagmeister & Walsh. The products ranged from subtle-yet-beautiful ombre wood-look tiles to all out in-your-face florals that faded into colorful pixels. In a match made in heaven, Scholten & Baijins has designed a serenely beautiful collection of graphic gradient patterns for Skyline Design. Its subtle patterns, which can be arranged in multiple ways to allow more light or more privacy, are paired with a curated color palette that look great as a whole. One brand that really stood out in terms of innovation was DIRTT, which stands for "doing it right this time." Not only can they build practically anything designers and architects can dream up, they can do it in a very short amount of time. They have also pioneered new virtual reality technology that allows users to edit 3-D models in real time, as well as being able to physically walk inside these digital models. The Conexus lounge chair by HBF, designed by Michael Vanderbly, maintains the craftsmanship and style of luxury residential furniture alongside ultra-durable materials that would suit practically any hotel lobby, upscale retail store, or office reception area. In addition, they also debuted a striking collection of textiles designed by European designer Christian Müller. Other impressive textiles include Carnegie's Alunet, an open-neat weave that controls heat and glare with maximum transparency, and Reflectacoustic, an innovative design that controls sounds as well as delivering heat and glare reduction through yarn, weaving, and metalized backing technology.
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Product>aesthetically pleasing contract textiles

Age-old classics juxtapose modern technology for versatile interiors. Haberdasher Collection Herman Miller

Herman Miller’s Laura Guido-Clark, who designed the collection, was inspired by the classic fabrics and sewing tools one would find in a tailor’s workshop. The mix of prints and solids are available in a large assortment of colors and meant to commingle. 

Terra Collection Alcantara

With names like Pangea, Laurasia, and Ur, Alcantara’s second luxury collection is designed with the theory of supercontinents and the texture of earth’s different terrains in mind. The material is antibacterial and can be specified as fire-retardant and weatherproof.

Balance Collection Knoll Textiles

Balance is comprised of one wall covering, one drapery, and five upholstery fabrics that play off one another and harmonize. The collection is full of durable options, with four out of the five upholstery options achieving 100,000+ double rubs Wyzenbeek. The Wit fabric is bleach cleanable, and both Melody and Tinge are 21 phthalate-free vinyl, making them environmentally responsible to boot.

Configure Shaw

Building on the success of its existing hexagonal collection, Plane, Shaw added 14 new colors to the palette, as well as three new styles of shifting shapes that can be combined to create subtle tonal patterns or impactful entryways. All of the styles are 26-ounce, multi-level pattern, cut-loop construction made with EcoSolution Q nylon and EcoWorx backing.

Fast Track Sina Pearson Textiles

With sportswear trends taking over the fashion world, "athleisure" has made its way to interior design with Sina Pearson’s newest collection of textiles. Patterns like Marathon, Sprinter, and Mesh are made from high-performance upholstery fabric that feature Sunbrella contract yarn and PVC-free polyurethane.

Plaid Chilewich

One of two new weaves launching at Neocon, Plaid is available in wall-to-wall flooring, as well as wall textiles in six-foot roll widths. Designers can also opt for 18-inch-square tiles and 6- by 36-inch planks to create a more patterned look. The collection is offered in tan, multi, and gray colorways.

Dazzling Dialogues Moooi

Designer Noortje van Eekelen explores modern symbols in her Dazzling Dialogues design that uses warped emojis to create detailed patterns that serve as a reminder of how we communicate with one another in this tech-driven world. 

Floor Tiles Mosa The ideal in floor design is to achieve superb aesthetics in every project, while also ensuring design integrity and minimizing risk. Risk within the project, and risk to the designer’s reputation and bottom line, can be minimized with thoughtful floor design, combined with careful and diligent specification of tiled surfaces. Learn more about the top 5 factors to consider before specifying tile.
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Cooper Hewitt announces fall exhibitions focusing on textiles, socially-responsible design

The two exhibits take a very different approach to their subject matter, with the first heavily centered on a specific medium and industry (textiles) while the second focuses broadly on how design can tackle social challenges ranging from healthcare to transportation infrastructure. Read below for more details! Scraps: Fashion, Textiles and Creative Reuse, Sept. 23–April 16, 2017 Traditional craft and modern sustainability will intersect within this exhibit, which will include more than forty works from Reiko Sudo of Tokyo-based textile design firm Nuno, Luisa Cevese of Milan-based studio Riedizioni, and Christina Kim of Los Angeles-based brand dosa. Museum Director Caroline Baumann said in a press release, “Telling the inspiring and empowering stories of three women designers and entrepreneurs who hail from three continents, Scraps brings critical focus to the human and environmental costs of fashion consumption while also offering viable solutions for reducing waste and raising awareness." By the People: Designing a Better America, Sept. 30–Feb. 26, 2017 Cynthia E. Smith, the Cooper Hewitt’s curator of socially responsible design, spent two years compiling By the People. It will cover 60 projects that relate to health care, alternative transportation, sustainable land use, food, education, and more. An introductory section of the exhibition, which will include a video by Cassim Shepard and an interactive data visualization titled Mapping the Measure of America, aims to explore social inequality in the U.S. and contextualize the other exhibit's other projects. Baumann added "By the People will showcase the innovative and impactful actions generated through design, and inspire creative problem-solving at local, regional, national and even international levels."
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Product> Pretty in Pink

When it comes to interiors, pink has grown from a trendy accent color to one of the most popular hues. There has been a large focus on bold geometric prints, adapted from textile motifs such as powdery roses and in-your-face coral window coverings. Sahara Aelfie

All of designer Aelfie Oudghiri’s products are handwoven on traditional dhurrie floor looms in India. Berber textiles, Islamic geometry, and North African ceramics melded with the youth culture and fashion of the moment inspire her modern designs.

Cross Cut Danskina

A luxurious wool and viscose material composes this graphic grid rug that evolves into an organic pattern at its end. The cutouts allow the floor to be visible, creating a stark contrast. Cross Cut is available in nine color options to suit any decor.

Roller Blinds Kvadrat

Paris-based brothers Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec have designed Kvadrat’s brand-new line of top-quality aluminum blinds that control light as well as glare and temperature. The system utilizes a patented fixing mechanism that hides all screws and hinges. The blinds are available in chain, switch, and remote-control-operated versions.

SILAÏ Charlotte Lancelot for GAN

The newest collection from Belgian designer Charlotte Lancelot for Gandia Blasco’s indoor brand, GAN, is motivated by the work of craftsmen. Woven over a plastic grid, four different stitches create a combination of detailed patterns.

Bright Angle Scholten & Baijings

Suitable for commercial and residential upholstering, this 40 percent cotton, 33 percent polyester, and 27 percent nylon blend is also available in custom antimicrobial stain-resistant finishes with impermeable backing. This print is by Amsterdam-based design studio Scholten & Baijings, which is known for its clean, minimal product designs.

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Marimekko for The Masses! Finnish design house debuts collection for Target

Daydreaming of the sun shining down on your cold, pale skin? In Helsinki (where Marimekko is based), the sunshine lasts until nearly midnight in the summer months, inspiring a cheerful uplifting palette of punchy prints that are bound to brighten up any interior year-round. The timeless brand has been creating original prints since 1951. Now, a collaboration with Target will bring the colorful designs to the masses. The collection will feature more than 200 pieces that span outdoor décor, furniture, entertaining essentials, and apparel. It will be available in stores starting April 17.