Posts tagged with "terrazzo":

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French researcher "quarries" on site for a new type of recycling and restoration

“The mass-production of rubble constitutes one of modern architecture’s main legacies,” said the French designer and researcher Anna Saint Pierre. So much of what gets built gets demolished, or decays and needs to be restored or renovated. She explained that “The building sector accounts for 50 percent of natural resource consumption and almost 40 percent of waste production within European territories.” To help combat this waste she’s developed a new technique of in-situ recycling called Granito. The concept is to “quarry” materials on-site, taking stone from surrounding demolished structures and pulverizing it for use in new aggregates—by reusing these materials on location there’s no need for transportation. An architect at the French firm SCAU, Saint Pierre is putting Granito to the test on one of the office’s Paris projects. Saint Pierre’s proposal is to take 182 tons of unwanted granite panels from the extant structure, an office block also designed by the firm and opened in 1997 as the headquarters of Télédiffusion de France, and grind, sort, and reincorporate the material into terrazzo floors for the new building, a co-working space. Saint Pierre says that the granite and terrazzo floors, visible from the street, will act as “a fifth facade.” In addition to working to create terrazzo, she’s also been using in-situ recycling to create gabion walls, including for a future housing project. Since announcing Granito earlier this year, Saint Pierre has worked to tweak the process to become more energy efficient. “This project highlights the impact that the ever-shortening life of tertiary real estate programs has on the life and death cycle of the materials used,” Saint Pierre said. In this manner, Granito is not just a practical solution, but also a commentary on issues of architectural preservation. “Granito investigates new modes of memory transmission through [the] in-situ transformation of rubble,” she explains. “It’s an alternative to both ‘tabula rasa’ approaches or strict restoration.” Granito, “investigates site-specific loops of remembrance,” and understanding just what “in situ” might mean in this context is key to understanding the purpose of Granito. It’s about “the existing site, its memory, and its mutation.”
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Matt Woods leaves every inch uncovered in a renovated Sydney cafe

Sydney-based designer and self-professed foodie Matt Woods is known for his unbridled aesthetic. Motifs of his oeuvre include beautifully repurposed objects, attention to a material, and a conceptual design approach, all of which show up again and again in his significant body of work—a plethora of cafes, restaurants, bars, and retail spaces. His designs don’t hit you over the head with historic references or millennial stylistic nuances. Rather, the overall effect stems from a pleasantly unexpected aesthetic; where if you were to take all furniture, wall coverings, light fixtures, and all other elements apart and separate them into a collected pile, it would look like those things wouldn't normally go together—and yet somehow, they do and to an impressive degree.  Enter the otherworldly atmosphere of the Messenger Cafe, a sweeping space swathed in terrazzo. The materiality of the aggregate-manufactured tiles that clad most of the space has become a metaphor for the scheme: beauty found in irregularly and seeming lack of uniformity. The walls, floors, countertops, and caramel leather cushioned banquettes seating are also anchored by terrazzo slabs produced by Fibonacci Stone. Woods are implemented in steeple-like triangle planes, placed in the foreground of the cafe's curtain walls. Read the full article on our interiors and design website, aninteriormag.com.
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OMFGCO's Hideout bar offers a riotous nod to Hawaiian modernism

With a tropical twist on Marmoreal by Dzek, the new Hideout bar by creative design agency OMFGCO at the Laylow hotel in Waikiki, Hawaii, is simply this: a riot.
A riot of textures. A riot of patterns. A riot of stylistic references wrapped up and rolled into one indoor-outdoor bar and restaurant that surfs a tropicalia-tinged wave of maximal eclecticism. The watering hole is set in a revamped 1960s-era modernist hotel that was renovated and rebranded by OMFGCO with help from San Francisco–based Randolph Designs, who collaborated on the interiors and created furniture for the hotel’s 251 guest rooms. OMFGCO handled branding, interior design, and art direction for the project’s public spaces, deploying a highly curated set of self-consciously referential design elements to promote familiarity and style. Using playful repetition and a no-holds-barred, mood board–focused approach for the project, the designers generated spaces that pay tribute to popular tropical tropes, like birds of paradise, hula bobblehead dolls, and straw-backed chairs, in playful, raucous ways.
The project, according to Fritz Mesenbrink, cofounder and creative director at OMFGCO, is heavily inspired by the work of Hawaiian modernist architect Vladimir Ossipoff—and it shows in the crisp, low lines of the bar, the peek-through screened entry, and the rough-hewn materiality of each of the spaces. A bamboo entry deck is situated at the face of the Hideout, where a bobblehead-backed reception desk and waiting lounge also sit. Here, a 100-foot-long terra-cotta breezeblock wall designed by Spanish architect Patricia Urquiola for Mutina and collections of potted tropical plants create an area that sits both outside and within the hotel tower. The lounge areas, like the remaining parts of the bar and restaurant located beyond, are scattered with lounge furniture, some of the pieces hand-picked by OMFGCO’s design team from vintage collections, others were specifically made for the project. The bar and restaurant spaces within hold even more special furniture, including vintage Arthur Unano barstools that run parallel to beadboard paneling and countertops made out of Marmoreal—an engineered marble stone aggregate that resembles terrazzo—along the bar. The L-shaped bar is backed by cabinets that incorporate Marmoreal shelving as well, serving to highlight the “modern tiki” theme the designers sought. Mesenbrink said, “The Umanoff barstools are probably my personal favorite piece of furniture at the Laylow. We had to gather them from all over the country and a few from overseas, then had them touched up to feel new again.” Leafy, hand-painted wallpaper murals by Michael Paulus and an accent wall populated by a field of drink umbrellas fill out the lobby areas, which connect the bar to a small restaurant packed with wicker seats and a wraparound booth. Beyond the restaurant? A poolside veranda—called a lanai—containing conical fire pits, drink stands, and sand-filled floors.
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Specsheet > Luminous, sustainable pavers and decks

Pavers and decks are increasingly attractive, interactive, and environmentally sustainable, while easily withstanding open-air foot traffic.
E_STREET Edilgres This collection of porcelain stoneware pavers is extremely durable, excellent for high-traffic areas such as commercial interiors and pool decks. These tiles are available in five colors and come in three sizes (24 by 48 inches, 24 by 24 inches, and 12 by 24 inches).
TERRAZZO LUMINA Sensitile This interactive concrete building material comes in slabs and tiles embedded with light-conducting channels that shift, shimmer, and twinkle in response to light, movement, and shadows. Each slab or tile is unique in composition—they are fashioned from a sustainable material containing at least 20 percent postconsumer waste for LEED credits.
STILL NO_W Flaviker Part of Flaviker's Wide collection, Still No_w is 1⁄4 inch thick, perfect for use as both a wall covering and flooring. The dry-pressed porcelain stoneware slabs come in a wide range of styles and shapes, which include triangular tiles that can be mixed and matched with contrasting shades to create a unique pattern.
NATURAL FEELING Novabell Novabell’s wood-look porcelain tiles come in four distinctive tones and seamlessly transition from an indoor to an outdoor space. Each plank bears a texture that mimics wood grain, but without the concerns that typically accompany the maintenance of aging outdoor surfaces. The Natural Feeling collection is made up of 40 percent recycled content.
NORDIC STONE Italgraniti Resembling the characteristics and qualities of Burlington stone, the Nordic Stone collection comes in six shades and seven different sizes. Italgraniti captured the distinct veining in each porcelain tile with a silky and soft finish. Functional and versatile, this collection responds well to large public spaces with heavy traffic.
PORCELAIN PAVERS Handydeck Available in wood, stone, cement, and rustic styles and in over 30 colors, these structural pavers can support loads over 2,000 pounds. They can be installed directly over existing concrete, laid over sand or gravel, embedded in mortar and grouted, or placed on adjustable-height pedestals for elevated decks and terraces.