Posts tagged with "Tadao Ando":

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Tadao Ando chosen to build a new art museum inside former Paris stock exchange

Japanese architect Tadao Ando has been tapped to design a new museum inside one of Paris’s historical buildings, the former stock exchange Bourse de Commerce. On Monday, French billionaire and art collector François Pinault unveiled his plans to create a contemporary museum for his private art collection within the glass-domed building, which is steps away from the Louvre and the Palais Royal. Pinault, who has worked with Ando before on the Palazzo Grassi and Punta della Dogana in Venice, chose him to lead the Paris project's design and preservation efforts, along with French firm NeM Architects, French National Heritage architect Pierre-Antoine Gatier, and engineering firm Setec. “Considering the scope of this challenge, it seemed obvious that I should entrust Tadao Ando with this mission, as Ando is one of the few architects working today who is able to create a dialogue between architecture and its context, its past and present, masterfully combining originality and discretion,” said François Pinault in a press release. Ando’s addition will be a cylinder in the iconic rotunda that will create three levels of gallery spaces that are open to the dome and encase an auditorium below ground. Corridors will also be constructed between the outside of the cylinder and the "interior facade" to create a new space for circulation. (The Bourse de Commerce incorporates several structures built over the centuries on that site; French architect Henri Blondel (1821-1897) designed an 1889 addition that serves as the current facade.) Besides a redesign of the internal space, the plans for the Bourse also include restoring its exterior and landmarked interiors—the internal facade, skylights, and frescoes. Restoration to the 19th century, neoclassical building is estimated to cost $121 million. The announcement also revives a long battle between the two well-known art collectors in France: Pinault and Bernald Arnault. They have both sought homes for their private art collections, with Arnault’s currently in the Frank Gehry–designed Fondation Louis Vuitton in Paris. The ambitious project takes on additional political significance in “tumultuous times,” where recurring terrorist incidents and Brexit cast doubt on what the future holds, as Ando described in a press release. “This is a project that calls on the people to recall France’s proud identity as a country of culture and art and to renew their hopes for the future.” The museum is expected to open in 2019.
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Three finalists named in PXSTL design-build competition

The Pulitzer Arts Foundation and the Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts at Washington University in St. Louis have announced three finalists for the second iteration of the design-build PXSTL competition. The three finalist were culled from a list of 35 artist, architects, and designers, who were solicited by the organizer. The list includes: —Randstad, NL and Istanbul-based architects Merve Bedir and Jason Hilgefort —New York/Houston-based artist Mary Ellen Carroll —Chicago-based architect Amanda Williams and artist/educator Andres L. Hernandez PXSTL (David Johnson) Canopy of the 2014 PXSTL structure. (David Johnson) All of the finalist will travel to St. Louis in mid-February to conduct detailed site analysis and give public presentations on their previous work and interest in PXSTL. The winner will be announced in March. Along with an $80,000 budget to complete the project, the winner will teach an architecture studio as visiting faculty at the Sam Fox Graduate School of Architecture & Urban Planning in Fall 2016 semester. With commentary from community stakeholders, cultural organizers and local artist, the winner will work with their students to develop the project over the semester. PXSTL (an acronym for Pulitzer, Sam FoX School, and ST. Louis) is a competition for a design-build commission to build a temporary structure on an empty lot near the Pulitzer Art Foundation in the Grand Center arts district. The fist iteration of the PXSTL was completed in 2014 by the Brooklyn-based Freecell Architecture. Their project comprises of a large canopy under which dance, music, and community events were held throughout the summer of 2014. This year’s competition will conclude in the pavilion construction in spring of 2017 and community programing through the summer of 2017. The goal of PXSTL is in engage the community with small-scale intervention to encourage urban transformation. As part of this, the public will have a chance to offer feedback in public forums to be held in the fall. “Since its founding, the Pulitzer has been dedicated to creating opportunities for art and culture to have a positive impact on the broader St. Louis community. As PXSTL demonstrates, this means working closely with and listening carefully to both our community and cultural partners.” Remarked Cara Starke, director of the Pulitzer Arts Foundation, in a press release.
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Architect Tadao Ando and artist Elyn Zimmerman win the third annual Isamu Noguchi Award

The Noguchi Museum has named architect Tadao Ando and artist Elyn Zimmerman recipients of the 2016 Isamu Noguchi Award. The award, given annually since 2014, recognizes practitioners who "share Noguchi’s spirit of innovation, global consciousness, and East-West exchange." The awards will be presented during the Noguchi Museum’s Spring Benefit in May. Like Noguchi, Ando incorporates natural elements into his designs, and shapes space with humble materials like concrete. Among many notable commissions, his Osaka-baed practice, Tadao Ando Architects & Associates, designed the Pulitzer Arts Foundation building in St. Louis, Missouri (2001), the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, Texas (2002), and the Punta Della Dogana Contemporary Art Center, Venice (2009). Ando received the Pritzker Prize in 1995. Zimmerman is known for her site-specific stone installations that play on water and light. Her public commissions include the Sculpture Garden at the Birmingham Museum of Art in Birmingham, Alabama (1993), a pool and granite sculpture, for the National Geographic headquarters in Washington, D.C. (1980), as well as Suspended Arcs, a commission for the Beijing Olympics (2008). In 2015, the award was granted to industrial designer Jasper Morrison and architect Yoshio Taniguchi. Norman Foster and artist Hiroshi Sugimoto claimed the honor in its inaugural year.
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Tadao Ando opens up about his first New York City building, architecture as living light, and an early career in professional boxing

New York developers Sumaida & Khurana are breaking architectural ground with a series of residential buildings in New York City designed by architects who have never built there before. Their first is a seven-unit beaut by Tadao Ando—called ICHIGONI (152) or 152 Elizabeth—set to bring glass-smooth concrete and highly detailed steel to Manhattan's Nolita neighborhood. And now Ando is opening up about its design. https://vimeo.com/130195081 AN previously covered the project's design by Ando and Gabellini Sheppard:
According to Ando, “A living space should be a sanctuary,” and for the NoLita project, the team has chosen a natural material palette that creates spaces that compress and expand while giving “life to light and water,” according to Michael Gabellini, principal of Gabellini Sheppard. Concrete solids give way to voids of glass and light. “Concrete is a very democratic material, very accessible,” Gabellini explained. “It doesn’t create a gap between the rich and poor like some other materials.”
Now, design video 'zine Nowness has released a video interview with Ando, where he speaks about his design philosophy and process in his native tongue (with captions, too). In the video, Ando said, "A living space should be a sanctuary. It has to be a place where you can reflect on your life. When one arrives home, there's a very tranquil feeling. This project is about that." He compared the design process to his experience boxing professionally as a teenager, staying a step ahead. "Architecture is also a battle," he said. "I wanted to make something which no one else could," Ando continued. "A very quiet piece of architecture." Specifically, he sought to bring a distinct Japanese sensibility to the project while not losing its unique sense of place in the city. "Here is where you most feel, 'I'm living in New York,'" he said. In his design, he said water and light become "a living thing." Watch the video for yourself above and view more renderings here. Developers also plan another 400-foot-tall tower in Midtown by famed Portuguese architect Álvaro Siza Vieira.
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Creative Time’s Cara Starke named next director of the Pulitzer Arts Foundation

Founder and Chair of the Pulitzer Arts Foundation, Emily Rauh Pulitzer, announced today that Cara Starke, the director of exhibitions at Creative Time, will step into the role of director at the St. Louis–based cultural institution, beginning this July. During her years at Creative Time, Starke spearheaded some of the organization's more elaborate, large-scale projects and exhibitions, including this past summer's popular installation, A Subtletyby artist Kara Walker. “Cara’s approach to the work and operations of an arts institution is exceptional. She has a keen understanding of the evolving role the arts play in our lives and in our communities—a vision that is well in line with the Pulitzer’s tradition of pushing the boundaries of the arts experience,” said Pulitzer in a statement. Prior to her tenure at Creative Time, Starke cut her teeth as the assistant curator for the department of media and performance art at the Museum of Modern Art, where she helped organize several exhibitions, such as Olafur Eliasson's Take your time and Doug Aitken's Sleepwalkers. The Tadao Ando–designed Pulitzer building is currently undergoing an expansion to add 3,700 square feet of public space—complementing the 7,500-square feet of existing galleries—to carve out new areas for exhibitions and programs. Starke will take over for Kristina Van Dyke who has served as director since 2011 and worked with Mrs. Pulitzer in the conception of the institution's expansion. "The Pulitzer is a remarkable space that brings together intellectual experimentation and thoughtful contemplation with a commitment to local audiences and experiences that extend beyond the institution’s walls,” said Starke in a press release. “With the recent expansion, the Pulitzer has increased opportunities to offer unexpected, profound, and innovative approaches to artistic and cultural expression. I am honored to lead the Pulitzer into its next phase as an open and inspired space for art and culture.”
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Deafening Silence: Morphosis designs a skyscraper in the Alps next to Peter Zumthor’s famous Therme Vals spa

Can a 1,250-foot-tall skyscraper qualify as "a minimalist object” under any circumstances? It depends on who you ask—particularly if the building in question, the 7132 Tower hotel designed by Los Angeles–based architecture firm Morphosis for a site in Vals, Switzerland, would go up next to Peter Zumthor’s understated Therme Vals spa. Morphosis’ Thom Mayne said yes, calling the slender, reflective high-rise “a minimalist act that reiterates the site and offers to the viewer a mirrored, refracted perspective of the landscape.” The project’s critics, meanwhile, accuse Morphosis and client 7132 Limited of disrespecting the hotel’s surroundings, both natural and built. Zumthor, who completed the quartzite-walled Therme Vals spa in 1996, appears to be taking the “if you don’t have anything nice to say, don’t say anything at all” approach. BD Online quoted a firm spokesperson as saying, “He doesn’t want to comment on this hotel.” The tower—which would top Renzo Piano’s Shard by over 200 feet to become the tallest in the European Union—is still a long way from being built, requiring planning permission and a public vote prior to construction. Among the marks against it are the manner by which Morphosis received the commission. What began as a competition ended in February with a unilateral decision by 7132 Limited to narrow the three-firm shortlist down to one, over the jury’s objection. On the plus side, Mayne’s concept has garnered a vote of confidence from Tadao Ando, whose nearby Valser Path park is expected to be finished by 2017. “I believe it will harmonize in the beautiful landscape and will attract and impress various guests and visitors from all over the world,” said Ando.
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Moscow’s Shukhov Tower won’t be dismantled after all

One of Russia’s most distinctive pieces of architecture—the 1920s-era Shukhov Radio and Television tower in Moscow—has skirted what appeared to be its imminent death. Earlier this year, news broke that local authorities planned to dismantle the deteriorating, hyperboloid structure, which was built as a communist communications tower. Russian officials said the structure could possibly be reassembled somewhere else, but preservationists didn't buy it. And, at the time, leading architects from around the world—including Rem Koolhaas, Thom Mayne, Tadao Ando, and Elizabeth Diller—signed a petition to stop the tower’s demolition. It’s hard to know exactly what impact that petition had, but something clearly changed in the past few months. The Moscow Times is now reporting that the city has placed the structure on a federal list of protected heritage sites. While this reportedly stops plans to dismantle or relocate the structure, the Shukhov Tower is not entirely in the clear just yet. The tower has been decaying for years and needs close to $14 million in repairs. "The bureaucratic procedure of drafting documents to preserve buildings … is not a guarantee they will be saved," Sergei Arsenyev, the vice president of the Shukhov Tower Federation, told the Guardian. "If they don't allocate money for saving [the] tower, sooner or later it will die." [h/t ArchDaily]
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Details of Tadao Ando’s New York City Residential Building Unveiled

Since news about a Tadao Ando–designed residential building in Manhattan's Nolita neighborhood broke in March, anticipation has been building about what the Pritzker Prize–winning starchitect had planned for his first large-scale project in New York City. Now, renderings of the seven-story project have been published by Dezeen, but they offer a frustratingly vague sense of what's in store for Elizabeth Street. Here's what we do know: the building has floor-to-ceiling windows, a significant concrete wall on at least of its sides, and a rooftop terrace with a reflecting pool. Dezeen reported, “It will be constructed using in-situ concrete, galvanised steel and large expanses of glazing"—materials that Ando has used for many projects, from his 1989 Church of the Light in Osaka to the recently completed art and design school at the University of Monterrey. The building only houses eight units, each of which has interiors designed by Gabellini Sheppard Associates. All to say, these apartments won’t run cheap so Ando fans better start saving their cash now—the building opens in 2016. While Ando has received multiple awards and international acclaim, this is his first major entry into the New York market. But it is not his first: Ando designed the lobby and penthouse at 43 Crosby Street and the interior of the Morimoto restaurant. As his first ground-up project gets underway in New York, he is also expected to break ground on an expansion of his Pulitzer Arts Foundation in St. Louis.
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Ta-da!: Ando Tipped for New York Condos

Tadao Ando appears set to realize his first ground-up residential project in New York City. Andrew Luck's favorite will be designing eight condominiums in a building to be located on a Nolita corner currently occupied by a parking garage. Developers Saif Sumaida and Amit Khurana drummed up $21 million to purchase the site and thus pave the way for what is projected to be a 32,000-square-foot structure. The  Pritzker Prize winner has previously offered smaller contributions to the city. Ando made his New York debut inside Japanese restaurant Morimoto and also designed the penthouse and lobby of a Soho apartment buildingGabellini Sheppard will take care of the interior of the new space, which is said to be opening in 2016. [Via Curbed.]
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Look Out, Los Angeles: The Architecture & Design Film Festival Is Headed Your Way

This March, Angelenos will get front-row seats to the nation’s largest art, architecture, and urbanism–oriented film festival. Founded in 2009 in New York, the Architecture & Design Film Festival (ADFF) is coming to the West Coast for the first time March 12–16. The ADFF’s program includes 30 feature-length and short films, plus panel discussions, Q&A sessions with directors and subjects, special receptions, and a Hennessey + Ingalls pop-up bookshop. ADFF kicks off with a screening of If You Build It, a film by Patrick Creadon, directory of Wordplay and I.O.U.S.A. The feature-length documentary follows designer-activists Emily Pilloton and Matt Miller through a year of work with high school students in rural North Carolina. Also screening on opening night is 16 Acres, on a decade of rebuilding Ground Zero, and Design is One: Massimo & Lella Vignelli, on the work of the husband-and-wife graphic design team. Films scheduled for the following four days range from biopics on designers including Paul Smith, Tadao Ando, and Paolo Soleri, to a short film on farming in Brooklyn, to the The Human Scale, a Danish feature film on Jan Gehl’s urbanism. The world premiere of TELOS: The Fantastic World of Eugene Tssui will take place on the second night of the festival. Three California-centric films are on the ADFF menu. The Oyler House: Richard Neutra’s Desert Retreat looks at the relationship between Neutra and his working-class client. Chavez Ravine: A Los Angeles Story, chronicles the community's destruction. Coast Modern is a video tour of modern houses from Los Angeles to Vancouver. And Levitated Mass tells the story of the 340-ton boulder’s journey from a Riverside quarry to its permanent home at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. ADFF is curated by Kyle Bergman and Laura Cardello. All events will be held at the Los Angeles Theatre Centre. For more information on ADFF, including a list of speakers (TBD), visit the festival website.
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Architects Take Milan, Part 2: Collaborations Abounded At This Year’s Furniture Fair

AN had boots on the ground at the 2013 Milan Furniture Fair, taking the air and parsing the differences. This year saw an abundance of collaborations between furniture designers and architects. What follows is the second half of our greatest hits, everything from modular shelving and sleek hardware to design-forward consoles and practical seating. View even more architect-designed furniture from Milan in the first section of our roundup here. Parrish Collection Emeco In conjunction with its collaboration with Konstantin Grcic on the mobile interiors of the new Parrish Art Museum, Emeco released the Parrish Collection of modular indoor–outdoor chairs and tables. Chairs are available with three recycled aluminum frame designs that can be combined into four seat options, including one made of locally sourced wood from Lancaster, Pennsylvania. Ovetto Wallsystem FLOS Continuing his collaboration with Flos, Antonio Citterio designed the new Ovetto wall light for functional up- and down-lighting on walls. The light can be mounted on a rosette or in its own socket. Other additions to the Wallsystem collection include a long-necked Minikelvin design and Disco, a pivoting head that allows for adjustable directional lighting. Tools for Life Knoll Celebrating 75 years of design at this year’s Salone, Knoll introduced its new Tools for Life collection designed by Rem Koolhaas’ practice, OMA. The twelve-piece collection is designed to facilitate the flow between office and social life with adjustable tables and consoles available in a range of Knoll finishes. Dream Chair Carl Hansen & Son Pritzker Prize–winning Japanese architect Tadao Ando and Carl Hansen & Son teamed up to pay tribute to Danish furniture designer Hans Wegner, one of Ando’s own influences. Designed with a single piece of bent plywood atop a bent plywood base, the chair is also available in oak and American walnut with optional leather upholstery. Stack Shelving Paustian Designed by professor and architect Anders Brix, Paustian’s Stack shelving system is made up of stacking elements that lock into each other, allowing the shelves to be assembled without tools. Elements are available in six colors and are easily reconfigured based on evolving needs at home or at the office. ColoRing Collection Schemata Architects Young Tokyo-based architect Jo Nagasaka, founder of Schemata Architects, reinterprets the traditional technique of Udukuri, in which a wood surface is polished to reveal its coarse grain pattern, applying bright paint leftover from construction sites before polishing the surface smooth. The collection includes a variety of tables, chairs, benches, and stools.
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Colloquium to Revisit the Building of Tadao Ando’s Pulitzer Foundation in St. Louis

Tadao Ando's architecture strives for perfection, with glass-smooth concrete walls nearly as reflective as mirrors, ideal proportion and geometry creating a sacred sense of space, and design details that reveal no part of a building is too small for consideration. In fact, as one story goes, Ando requested that a foot-thick concrete wall at his Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts in St. Louis be rebuilt multiple times since it didn't meet his strict standards. The Pulitzer, one of only a handful of buildings the Japanese architect has completed in the United States and the first in the US intended for public use, opened in 2001, demurely set behind a concrete wall in the city's Grand Center neighborhood. This Friday and Saturday (February 8 and 9), the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts and Washington University in St. Louis are hosting the free Building Pulitzer colloquium looking back at the four-year construction period of Ando's Pulitzer Foundation. According to Liane Hancock, architecture professor at Louisiana Tech University and co-organizer of Building Pulitzer, "The goal of the colloquium is to reveal how a building designed by an internationally recognized architect is actually brought to fruition." Multiple events taking place at Ando's Pulitzer Foundation and at the Fumihiko Maki-designed Steinberg Auditorium at Washington University will consider the Pulitzer's design and four-year construction process. Hancock continued:
Tadao Ando asked for one simple thing—that the local designers and contractors give their personal best to the project. As the team learned more and more how to meet the challenges of the building, their personal best continuously improved. What is pretty amazing is how both the architects of record and the contractors both talk about the environment that was built to encourage collaboration, problem solving, and innovation to meet the tolerances that Ando requested.
A number of events are planned, including a tour of the Pulitzer on Friday and a series of lectures and discussions by architecture professors Liane Hancock, Eric Hoffman of Washington University, Emily Rauh Pulitzer, and others. A keynote lecture on Friday, "Collaboration and Inovation Outside of Japan," will be delivered by Masataka Yano, associate at Tadao Ando Architect & Associates and project architect for the Pulitzer. Topics at the Building Pulitzer colloquium include:
  • the working structure between Tadao Ando’s team and the St. Louis team (“Working with Osaka”)
  • the realization of Ando’s design through unique methods of construction (“Translating Design Intent: Developing Means and Methods”)
  • the development of a work environment that fostered construction excellence (“Personal Best: Creating a Receptive Environment for Construction Excellence”)
Professor Liane Hancock and Steve Morby, facilities and construction manager at the Pulitzer, are in the process of writing a book, also called Building Pulitzer, that will include information from the colloquium and interviews with Morby and other key players in the building of the Pulitzer. Building Pulitzer is free and open to the public. More information and a schedule of events can be found at Washington University in St. Louis.