Posts tagged with "sustainable":

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William McDonough’s multi-use ICEhouse can be quickly assembled using local materials

Architect William McDonough's Innovation for the Circular Economy house (ICEhouse) was a gathering space during the 2016 World Economic Forum. The temporary meeting space was designed to exhibit the “positive design framework described in the book Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things, the sustainable development goals of the United Nations, and the reuse of resources implicit in the circular economy." ICEhouse experiments with McDonough's concept WonderFrame—a structural system designed for quick assembly, local materials, and a variety of uses. McDonough explained WonderFrame is “designed to help us find ways to utilize many kinds of affordable materials to create dignified buildings for people in a variety of situations. We are calling it ‘wonder’ because we want people to wonder what it’s made of, and ‘frame’ because it is meant to be whatever structure each community and culture may need, and constructed from whatever materials they have available in that place at that time.” ICEhouse is made up of aluminum and SABIC’s LEXAN. The walls and roof structure were assembled in only a few days, and Shaw Contract Group provided the flooring. To allow constant relocation, McDonough's building was designed to be disassembled and reassembled in a few days. After its week of use at the forum, ICEhouse will be deconstructed and transported to The Valley, Schiphol Trade Park, where it will be rebuilt on site.
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On Deadline> MoMA Calls For Ideas For Rockaway Exhibit

The Rockaways was one of many waterfront communities that sustained serious damage from Hurricane Sandy, which makes it an appropriate site for MoMA PS1’s upcoming exhibit. But first, MoMA PS1 and MoMA’s Department of Architecture and Design are reaching out to artists, architects, and designers to come up with ideas for creating a sustainable waterfront—whether that touches upon protection of the shoreline or alternative housing—to be presented at the show. Twenty-five proposals will be selected and presented online and at MoMA PS1’s temporary space, the VW Dome2 in Rockaway Beach during the month of April. But hurry, the deadline for proposals is tomorrow. Submissions should be in the format of a short video (under 3 minutes).
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Product> Haiku, by Big Ass Fans

Big Ass Fans are, as their name suggests, a producer of very large fans. They're used everywhere from dairy barns to art galleries to outdoor public installations like Wendy, HWKN's star-shaped pavilion for MoMA PS1's summer Warm Up series. They also make residential models, like Haiku, the latest product in their line up. Once you get over the eye roll-inducing slogan—Haiku: Poetry in Motion—it's a really incredible product. According to Energy Star it's the world's most efficient residential ceiling fan, and even exceeds their efficiency requirements by 450 to 750 percent. Whereas most fans use 90 to 100 watts, the Haiku uses just two to 30 watts, costing an average of $5 per year. The fan blades are made from Moso bamboo, a super-strong, fast-renewing material that's harvested sustainably in China and handcrafted in Kentucky. Before the bamboo is dried and finished, each individual stalk is inspected for imperfections. Haiku also comes in a glass-infused matrix composite in black or white. Either way, black, white, or bamboo, the cool-running motor is completely silent, even on the highest setting (there are ten in all). There's also a brand new mode called the Whoosh, which pulses to simulate natural variations in air flow. "Human thermal receptors have peak sensitivity to wind gusts that vary by 0.47 Hz; Providing air movement with this variation can increase perceived cooling by up to 40 percent." So far Haiku has won a handful of awards, including a red dot design award for product and bronze in the International Design Excellence Awards (IDEA) in the living room and bedroom category. Haiku in bamboo retails for $995.
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Quick Clicks> Of Newsprint, Shipping Containers, Plastic Bags, and Sustainable Intelligence

Store in Print. Aesop director Dennis Paphitis and Brooklyn architect Jeremy Barbour of Tacklebox stacked 1,800 copies of the New York Times for the new Aesop skin care kiosk in Grand Central Station. While perhaps not our preferred choice for newsprint here at the paper, the gray pages create a rich texture on which to displayed beauty products. More at Co.Design. Shipping Shop. London hopes to claim the world's first pop-up shopping center made of shipping containers, to be designed by British firm Waugh Thistleton. Renderings of BoxPark revealed on Treehugger show the site-manufactured boxes stacked and outfitted with reusable materials. Bagging a House. At the Studi Aperti Arts Festival in Ameno, Italy, design studios Ghigos Ideas and LOGh presented their architectural response to the seemingly endless supply of plastic bags. With help from students at Milan Polytechnic, the architects transformed an unfinished building with a wing made entirely of grocery bags. More at We Heart. Green Talk. DesignIntelligence released their 2011 "Green & Sustainable Design Survey," claiming that despite innovation in sustainable building, green construction is not yet mainstream practice. DI editor James Camor said sustainability and LEED is on the table, but maintained architects have not recognized the initiative’s urgency. More at The Dirt.
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Scarpa is King of the World (Updated!)

[ Updated 02.08.2011: Added the interview video, a gallery of Scarpa's 502 Colorado project, and more. ] You know you've hit the big time when you're not only invited to appear on Oprah, but you're interviewed by Leonard DiCaprio on Oprah. Such is the case with Larry Scarpa, of Santa Monica firm Brooks + Scarpa, who talked to Leo about his former firm Pugh + Scarpa's  502 Colorado in Santa Monica, which DiCaprio calls the “first green affordable housing project in the country.” Whether or not that’s true, the building does include 200 solar panels on its rooftop, providing much of the building’s energy. DiCaprio doesn’t ask Scarpa about any of the 44-unit building’s other green elements (including strategic orientation, natural ventilation, co-generation, and recycled materials), but that’s okay, he'll dream about it later. At least Scarpa gets to remind stubborn developers that building green can be cheaper than conventional building. By the way, we think Scarpa, who’s already a dead ringer for Top Chef’s Tom Colicchio, has earned himself a spot on DiCaprio’s next film, Devil in the White City, about the architects of the World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago.  Wake up and get that architect an agent NOW.