Posts tagged with "Sustainable Design":

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Historic Rockefeller Orangerie will become a net-zero art center

Lush, gated properties are not out of the ordinary in the Westchester village of Tarrytown, New York. However, set back upon the Rockefeller family’s former estate lies something entirely out of the ordinary—a stately greenhouse for growing oranges. Built in 1908 by architect William Welles Bosworth, the building served as a winter greenhouse for orange trees, an orangerie. More than a century later, New York-based architecture firm FXCollaborative wants to give "the Orangerie," a building on the estate, a new purpose, with plans to adapt it into a public arts center with net-zero carbon emissions. Plans for the David Rockefeller Creative Arts Center began in 2015 at the Pocantico Center, a conference and community resource center developed by the Rockefeller Brothers Fund (RBF) on the former Rockefeller property in Tarrytown. The new center will include multipurpose performance spaces, a gallery, and a flexible art studio that will also accommodate community programs. “The repurposed building will give us space to elevate and nurture the creative process," said Judy Clark, executive director of the Pocantico Center, “for both emerging and world-class artists, and local community groups alike.” With an emphasis on sustainability from the very beginning, FXCollaborative’s designs include a rain garden for stormwater control and habitat restoration as well as on-site solar panels that will generate more energy annually than the building will consume. The firm will also seek LEED Platinum certification for the Orangerie in alignment with RBF’s “decades-long commitment to promote sustainable design,” as described by Sylvia Smith, a senior partner at FXCollaborative. “Our approach will elegantly fuse arts-drive and net-zero energy design,” said Smith. “The result will be a laboratory for creative production and a model for sustainable transformation.” The regeneration will present a new chapter in the Orangerie’s unusual history on the Rockefeller estate, which has played home to four generations of the family. Post-World War II, the building was used as a storage facility before ownership was transferred to the National Trust for Historic Preservation in 1979. Today, it operates as part of the larger RBF amidst terraced residences and gardens. “The goal of this project is to see artists and their work as a dynamic work in progress, instead of a static, finished project,” said Smith. “We know Mr. Rockefeller believed art changes the way one perceives the world, and we’re excited to play an important part in facilitating that change in New York.” Construction for the David Rockefeller Creative Arts Center is set to begin later this year and conclude in the spring of 2021.

INSTALLATION: MADWORKSHOP x UCLA Architecture and Urban Design x Succulent Walls

Succulent Walls tackle how architecture can respond to Southern California’s precarious relationship to water and lack of disaster preparedness. The work of a Master of Architecture (M.Arch.I) Research Studio taught by Heather Roberge, this collaboration between Mary and David Martin's MADWORKSHOP and UCLA Architecture and Urban Design prototypes a series of residential water catchment systems. By integrating a system for easily installed water storage and food production into the residential vernacular, the class of eleven graduate students hopes to transform our laissez-faire attitude towards this critical and finite resource into one of proactive self-sufficiency. Five group projects were distilled into two super-group designs that will be showcased at the LA Design Festival.

Students: Christopher Doerr, Daniel Greteman, Ian Rodgers, Caroline Watts, Jenny Zhou, Nichole Tortorici, Talia Landes, Xiangkun Hu, Xihan Lyu, Xinwen Zhang, Yiran Chen

Video teaser: https://vimeo.com/342820070. ABOUT MADWORKSHOP Mary and David Martin’s MADWORKSHOP is a design education foundation. The foundation supports technological craftsmanship through university partnerships and an immersive fellowship program. With a focus on socially conscious projects, MADWORKSHOP supports radical, sustainable, and lasting contributions to design discourse and society at large. Find out more about MADWORKSHOP: http://madworkshop.org
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New building products from Greenbuild help to meet LEED standards

Meeting LEED standards isn’t easy. If you’re trying to design a healthy building environment, a great place to start is Greenbuild, the annual conference and expo dedicated to sustainability in the built environment. From November 20 to 22, professionals in architecture, design, construction, engineering, and planning flocked to Chicago's McCormick Place to learn more about environmentally friendly building materials and practices. You’ll find our favorite products that we saw below. Each answering to a different set of needs, they help to enhance building efficiency, human health and wellbeing, and promote sustainable design. Landmark Premium Double Hung Window  Silber Double hung?! Silber’s Landmark Premium Double Hung window opens in two directions: outward and downward. It is passive house–rated with thermal insulation and a multi-point locked, triple gasketed sash, making it airtight. Formawall with Halogen-Free Insulating Foam Core CENTRIA Dress up the facade and meet sustainability goals with Formawall. It can be used to make both vertical and horizontal designs. Better yet, the insulated panel system makes for a healthy building environment with a halogen-free foam core that provides thermal efficiency and moisture control. Mermet USA GreenScreen Nature Draper High-tech shade expert Draper paired up with sun control textile purveyor Mermet to offer a 100 percent fiberglass shade that’s 100 percent recyclable. GreenScreen Nature blocks up to 51 percent of sun, undesired heat, and harmful UV rays, helping to meet those green LEED building codes. It is offered in seven mineral-toned colors.   Metropolitan AF-690 Benjamin Moore Benjamin Moore’s color of the year is a cool, very agreeable shade of gray dubbed Metropolitan AF-690. Featuring cool undertones in a “neutral spectrum,” the shade and its harmonious 15 corresponding hues create “impactful common ground.” Living up to its namesake, it makes any room look “Metropolitan AF.” Pentagonals Tarkett Pentagonals is a collection of colorful modular tiles made of rubber, making it perfect for high-traffic areas. Pick and choose three different shapes to create virtually endless design combinations. And, with the help of Tarkett’s online visualizer tool, you can get motivated by the online inspiration gallery and create custom layouts with the design platform. Aromatic Cedar Columbia Forest Products Bye-bye pests and mildew! Cedar protects kitchens, pantries, basements, and indoor spaces alike from stink with its inherent natural properties (especially its scent). Columbia Forest Products' ¼-inch-by-4-feet-by-8-feet aromatic cedar plywood panels are offered in both mirrored and symmetrical styles.
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LEVER Architecture revamps The Nature Conservancy's Oregon HQ

  LEVER Architecture is currently renovating the Oregon headquarters of The Nature Conservancy in East Portland. The Oregon Conservancy Center (OCC), as the building will be known, is on track to becoming one of the first structures in the country to utilize U.S.-manufactured cross-laminated timber (CLT) made from Forest Stewardship Council (FSC)–certified wood. Located at the corner of SE Belmont Street and SE 14th Avenue, the three-story structure will be revamped with an open-office space for the majority of its staff. LEVER will elevate the existing facade with a weathered steel rain-screen and high-performance glazing while building a one-story addition featuring mass timber. The newly built structure will house event space and a conference center, topped with a roof garden and an outdoor deck. The architects specified sustainably-sourced Oregon Juniper, CLT, and cedar from Oregon, Washington, and California in an effort to complement the Conservancy's commitment to energy efficiency and environmental stewardship. An array of photovoltaic panels will hover over the building and cover one-quarter of its energy use while a new variable refrigerant flow (VRF) system will assist in heat recovery. “We’re excited to be part of a project that embodies The Nature Conservancy’s commitment to protecting and restoring critical ecosystems,” said LEVER’s principal Thomas F. Robinson in a statement. “The design connects people and nature by integrating materials and landscapes that are specific to The Nature Conservancy’s priority projects around the state.”   LEVER is working alongside Portland real estate developer Project^ to get the building off the ground. Project^’s vast portfolio includes the award-winning Framework, the first wood high-rise permitted in the country. Construction on the OCC started in March and is expected to be done in early 2019. The building is set to receive LEED V4 Gold certification.

C40: Reinventing Cities Competition

Reinventing Cities is an unprecedented global competition organized by the C40 to drive carbon neutral and resilient urban regeneration. Together 19 cities have identified 49 underutilized spaces, rapidly available for redevelopment. The initiative invites developers, architects, environmentalists and creative minds to collaborate and compete for the opportunity to transform these sites into beacons of sustainability and resiliency. The competition will serve as a model, demonstrating how the alliance between cities and business can shape the future delivering healthier, greener and economically viable urban development. How it Works: The Reinventing Cities competition helps cities identify and select the best projects to redevelop underutilized sites in cities around the world. Participating cities propose a diverse supply of land, including empty plots in new development areas, sites to densify in City centres, abandoned buildings, historical mansions, former industrial sites, underused car parks, etc... For each of these sites, the bidder teams will compete to buy or lease the site and to implement their project. Projects should address components such as energy efficiency, sustainable building materials, circular economy, water management and other components that will lead to a resilient and carbon-free development. The price won’t be the main criteria for the project selection. Supported by C40, the cities will favour bids from creative teams that deliver innovative climate solutions in combination with striking architecture and tangible benefits for the local community. An Unprecedented Competition: Beyond business as usual, Reinventing Cities targets climate-oriented project Beyond a call for ideas, Reinventing Cities targets real-life projects. It will lead to a property transfer enabling the winners to implement their project Beyond a simple design competition, Reinventing Cities targets holistic projects with innovative program, design and construction methodology Beyond frontiers, the Reinventing Cities teams will gain international exposure. They will be presented as pioneers, committed alongside Mayors to develop new models of carbon neutral and sustainable development. Reinventing Cities in Numbers:
19 participating cities 49 sites 711 ha to redevelop in total 27 sites with an area greater than 1 ha 24 empty plots to develop 14 sites to redevelop and densify 8 underused car parks to transform 9 individual existing buildings 4 patrimonial mansions & 2 markets 8 abandoned industrial sites Timeline:
December 2017:  Competition launch / Start of the 1st phase 4 May 2018: Submission of the Expression of Interest July 2018: Selection of each site’s finalist teams / Start of the 2nd phase November/December of 2018: Deadline for submission of the Final Proposals Early 2019: Selection of the winning projects / Competition closure
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AIA honors the top eleven sustainable buildings of 2018

As a fitting kickoff to Earth Day weekend, the American Institute of Architects (AIA) Committee on the Environment (COTE) has announced the 2018 recipients of its COTE Top Ten Awards. Honoring ten projects that have surpassed rigorous thresholds in integration, energy use, water conservation, and wellness benchmarks, the award showcases cutting-edge buildings that are not only sustainable, but that contribute to the surrounding neighborhood. This year’s jury included:
  • Michelle Addington, Dean, School of Architecture, The University of Texas Austin Austin, Texas
  • Jennifer Devlin-Herbert, FAIA, EHDD. San Francisco
  • Kevin Schorn, AIA, Renzo Piano Building Workshop, New York
  • Julie V. Snow, FAIA, Snow Kreilich, Minneapolis
  • Susan Ubbelohde, LOISOS + UBBELOHDE, Alameda, California
The 2018 awardees ranged in usage from libraries to art galleries, as well as one single-family home. While the COTE Top Ten Awards are given to buildings that meet certain requirements, an additional “Top Ten Plus Award” is handed out to a single project with exceptional post-occupancy performance. The winners are as follows: Albion District Library; Toronto, Ontario, Canada Architect: Perkins+Will According to the jury: "This project clearly demonstrates the immediate positive impact of good design. A district library that serves a diverse and newly-immigrant community, the library has a dramatically increased visitorship (with a notable 75 percent increase for teenagers) over the old facility." Georgia Tech Engineered Biosystems Building; Atlanta, Georgia Architect: Lake|Flato in collaboration with Cooper Carry According to the jury: "The Georgia Tech Engineered Biosystems Building weaves a large array of active and passive strategies into a highly tuned machine for this university research laboratory." Mundo Verde at Cook Campus; Washington Architect: Studio Twenty Seven Architecture According to the jury: "A 25,000-gallon cistern holds rainwater for reuse, while the gardens have increased site vegetation from zero to 40 percent." Nancy and Stephen Grand Family House; San Francisco Architect: Leddy Maytum Stacy Architects According to the jury: "This cost-effective building serves a community of sick children and their families while prioritizing environmental performance." New United States Courthouse; Los Angeles; Los Angeles Architect: Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP According to the jury: "We were impressed with the quality of the calm, light-filled interior spaces for occupants who are often in the courthouse under difficult circumstances." The Renwick Gallery of the Smithsonian American Art Museum; Washington, D.C. Architect: DLR Group According to the jury: "The Renwick Gallery renovation wove complex and robust new systems while preserving the impressive historic design and collection and allowing opportunities for new works to be displayed." San Francisco Art Institute - Fort Mason Center Pier 2; San Francisco Architect: Leddy Maytum Stacy Architects According to the jury: "The design team recognized the assets of the existing structure and created a great, low-energy building with a healthy interior environment." Sawmill; Tehachapi, California Architect: Olson Kundig According to the jury: "The team is commended for their site-specific analysis, as evidenced by the decision to let rainwater recharge the water table rather than collect it. If a single-family dwelling is to be built in a desert climate, this is how to do it." Sonoma Academy’s Janet Durgin Guild & Commons; Santa Rosa, California Architect: WRNS Studio According to the jury: "This project demonstrates that, even with an energy-heavy program that includes a commercial kitchen, a fully integrated and dedicated design team can produce a beautiful and extremely well-performing building." Top Ten Plus winner: Ortlieb's Bottling House; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Architect: KieranTimberlake According to the jury: "An exceptional example of passive strategies used in adaptive reuse of an historic urban building."
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Geodesic dome pioneer Jay Baldwin passes away at 85

Pioneering environmental architect and industrial designer James Tennant Baldwin has passed away. The 85-year-old architect often went by the name of Jay and is well-known for his pioneering research in the realm of geodesic dome design and for work inspired by the research of Buckminster Fuller. An avid inventor and tinker, Baldwin leaves a legacy of non-stop experimentation and inquiry that includes pursuing innovative social ideals, developing advanced and sustainable construction systems, and interrogating new technologies. Baldwin is perhaps best known as the inventor of the so-called “pillow dome,” a modular metal tube structural system filled-in with ETFE panels. Early in his career, Baldwin pioneered solar geothermal and sustainable technologies and is among the earliest adopters of nascent sustainable approaches to design and building. Baldwin was born in 1933 and attended the University of Michigan in 1951, where he studied automobile design. As a young student, Baldwin once witnessed Fuller lecture for 14 hours straight; the episode inspired Baldwin to study under and eventually work for Fuller before graduating. After graduating in 1955, Baldwin worked for Bill Moss Associates, designing advanced camping gear. During the 1960s, Baldwin was a visiting lecturer at Southern Illinois University and the design editor of the Whole Earth Catalog. Baldwin was later employed in the California state government under the first Jerry Brown administration in 1975, serving in the California Office of Appropriate Technology. In the 1990s, Baldwin wrote a book about Buckminster Fuller’s work and legacy titled Bucky Works: Buckminster Fuller's Ideas for Today. Baldwin—a life-long educator—taught at the variety of educational institutions including California College of the Arts in San Francisco, University of San Francisco, the San Francisco Institute of Architecture, and Sonoma State University. In a statement, CCA president Stephen Beal said,
"I am privileged and proud to say that Jay was a part of our CCA community for over 20 years, inspiring generations of CCA students beginning in 1995 and continuing through his recent retirement in 2016. From his groundbreaking work in sustainable design, to his contagious spirit and undying passion for the field, Jay was a remarkable human being. It was truly an honor to have known him and to know that our students had the chance to learn from him."
   
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Utah museum by Brooks + Scarpa echoes the surrounding desert landscape

Cedar City, Utah—about two and a half hours northeast of Las Vegas and three hours south of Salt Lake City—is a diamond in the rough. Or in this case, in the mountains. It’s surrounded by peaks and foothills and is in close proximity to a staggering array of national parks, including the Grand Canyon, Glen Canyon, Dixie National Forest, Bryce Canyon, and Zion National Park. Therefore, Brooks + Scarpa wanted to incorporate the timeless, yet eroded look and feel of these landscapes into its new building, the Southern Utah Museum of Art (SUMA)—the newest piece of Southern Utah University’s Beverly Taylor Sorensen Center for the Arts campus. The vivid, white, 28,000-square-foot building, clad on its flanks with textured, ribbed concrete panels, indeed resembles many of these carved-out formations. Its most noticeable element is the sculpted roof that features a 120-foot cantilever protecting the museum’s 20-foot-tall west-facing glass curtain wall from solar gain and glare. It also creates a covered social and event space underneath. The underside of the roof is a continuation of the plaster surfaces inside the museum. “I wanted to make the museum’s interior available to people outside without going in,” noted Brooks + Scarpa principal Larry Scarpa, who calls the single ply roof, visible from almost anywhere around the museum, the museum’s “fifth facade.” The roof also collects snow and rainwater, pitching and bending into a canyonlike formation that funnels water and snow melt, without any drains, into concealed wells at the base of the structure, where they are collected and recharged back into the aquifer. The museum’s interior consists of a large, open orthogonal gallery space that can be easily divided via freestanding partitions. These will host traveling exhibitions, student and faculty shows, artists, and a permanent collection of landscape-inspired work by local painter Jim Jones. Smaller spaces edging this core include a large classroom, offices, and back of-house storage. One hundred percent high-efficiency LED lighting, green materials, drought-tolerant plantings, and a trigeneration system to create heat, electricity, and cooling in one process, all contribute to energy conservation. Brooks + Scarpa, along with landscape architects Coen+Partners, carried out the revised master plan for the five-and-a-half-acre, $39.1 million Sorensen Center for the Arts, which includes sculpture gardens, parks, a tree-filled allé, and exterior spaces for live performance and public use. Its buildings include the Engelstad Shakespeare Theater, the Randall L. Jones Theater, the Eileen and Allen Anes Studio Theater, and an artistic and production facility. “We wanted the facilities to have their own identities, but still work together as a single complex,” explained Scarpa.
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Is mass timber really sustainable?

This is an article from our special November timber issue. We like to blame a lot of things for climate change—namely coal and cow farts—but if we were to search for a worthy scapegoat, architects might end up looking in the mirror. The building sector is responsible for 44.6 percent of U.S. carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. And, with an estimated 1.9 trillion billion square feet to be built in the next 33 years, those emissions will not subside without significant intervention. On the flip side, for architects anyway, this means the power to reduce carbon emissions is quite literally in your hands. “No designer—I think—wakes up and says, ‘I want to make the world worse today,’” William McDonough, architect, designer, and sustainable development leader said. “To make the world better, that’s our job.” Identifying successful ways to build sustainably can be difficult in a haze of greenwashing and checklist-style certifications, but many environmental experts, architects, and scientists are looking to mass-built timber as a reliable way to reduce carbon and fossil fuel output. A recent study, “Carbon, Fossil Fuel, and Biodiversity Mitigation with Wood and Forests,” stated that using wood as a building-material substitute could save “14 to 31 percent of global CO2 emissions and 12 to 19 percent of global FF [fossil fuel] consumption by using 34 to 100 percent of the world’s sustainable wood growth.” Building with timber reduces the overall carbon footprint in several ways. First, wood is a renewable resource, and growing a tree is a low-impact method of production (i.e. it uses photosynthesis rather than a plethora of machines). Second, trees are grown in abundance all over the United States and don’t need to be imported from abroad, reducing the amount of energy expended on shipping. “Right now we harvest less than half of what we could and still be well within the threshold of sustainability,” Kathryn Fernholz, the executive director at Dovetail Partners, an environmental nonprofit, explained. “That’s not the same in every single scenario, but in general in the U.S., we have an abundance of wood.” Third, and perhaps counter-intuitively, many environmentalists believe that harvesting trees allows forests to become more efficient at carbon sequestration. The logic is simple: When a tree is harvested, it stores carbon, then when another tree is planted in its place, it also will store carbon, making that plot of land’s carbon sequestration infinitely multipliable as trees are planted, grown, and harvested. “There is a widely held belief that cutting down trees is bad and causes loss of forest, but a strong market for wood products would cause us to grow more forests,” Fernholz said. “The vast majority of deforestation is land conversion, using the land for something else like development or agriculture. We know what resources we have and we monitor them and adjust. Forestry is not in the same place it was a hundred or even fifty years ago when deforestation was an issue.” While that stance of de-and reforestation is under debate among environmental experts, across the board, timber is generally a more sustainable building material because it is a renewable resource (provided that responsible forest practices are used). This includes the energy consumed to produce cross-laminated timber (CLT) in factories, which have a carbon emissions advantage over steel because the wood does not need to be heated over 2,700 degrees Fahrenheit like steel or concrete—in fact, unless the wood is kiln dried, heat isn’t need at all. Although embodied carbon is typically measured per building, because different amounts of each material are used in different scenarios, Wood for Good, a campaign by the timber industry to promote the material, claims that a ton of bricks requires four times the amount of energy to produce as a ton of sawn softwood (wood used for CLT); concrete requires five times, steel 24 times, and aluminum 126 times. “Reporting carbon emissions for wood includes a range of different assumptions and methods,” explained Kathrina Simonen, an associate professor of architecture at the University of Washington and director of the Carbon Leadership Forum. “So sometimes it ends up negative and sometimes it ends up positive. It can be confusing.” She is optimistic, however, that research is close to resolving the differences. Responsible forestry practices are already underway, with harvest occurring on long rotations so that the forest has time to regenerate itself and care can be taken to avoid removing other plants, roots, and branches in the process. Lastly, “Wood can be a durable good, as we've seen in ancient wooden buildings like the Temple at Nara, Japan [originally built in 745 AD and rebuilt in 1709],” McDonough said. “In [wood’s] history, it is often put into a cycle of use and reuse that can take it from large numbers to smaller and smaller [components].” Its ability to withstand centuries and to be disassembled and then reassembled into other buildings and furnishings keeps it out of the landfill and in a perpetual cycle of use until it can ultimately be returned to the environment in some form. Although well over 90 percent of one-to-three-story residential buildings are already wood-built, there are only a handful of mid-rise and tall timber buildings across the United States, a result of building codes that often prohibit timber-built structures larger than four to six stories. However, thanks in part to innovative wood products, including CLT, nail laminated timber (NLT), and glue laminated timber (glulam), wood construction can be used in buildings as tall as 40 stories. A study by consulting and engineering company Poyry and the New England Forestry Foundation shows that the greatest potential for timber-built is in mid-rise (six to 14 story) buildings, as it also tends to be more economical to build with timber at that scale. According to the Soft-wood Lumber Board, over two-thirds of the square footage in the mid-rise sector could be made with mass timber. These statistics combined, in addition to the taller structures that mass timber can create, have the potential to make a sizable dent in our CO2 and fossil fuel emissions. Like virtually everything in architecture, though, it is all in the details; for timber to be sustainable it has to be done correctly, from responsible forestry practices to environmentally safe glues and binders to craftsmanship and the design itself. “It is tremendously exciting. Building with wood creates diverse opportunities—there are different species and materials that all can work,” Fernholz said. “However, it is important to recognize that some things can come from wood, but nothing replaces good design and planning.”
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Architecture at Zero's net-zero energy competition winners announced

The 2016 winners for the Architecture at Zero competitionand the competition’s up-to-$25,000 prize—have been announced. This year’s competition focused on the development of zero-net energy (ZNE) student housing for the San Francisco State University campus in California. Entrants were asked to create an overall site plan to accommodate the erection of 784 housing units and attendant programs like a student services center, food hall, and child care facility. The schemes were also asked to address parking issues. Further, the competition brief compelled participants to develop the design of one particular building from their proposal to a greater level of detail in order to convey ZNE performance compliance and to provide documentation attesting to these performance standards. The competition is focused on fostering the development and proliferation of ZNE design due to an impending California state law requirement calling for all new single-family residential construction to be ZNE by 2020 with all new commercial construction to follow suit by 2030. Competition winners were appropriated based on two categories: those submitted by professional architecture firms and those submitted by students. Within each applicant category, winning entries were selected at the “special recognition,” “citation,” “merit,” or “honor” awards levels. Winners for student entries: Special Recognition Award: Sharing and Living by a student team from Tamkang University in Taipei, Taiwan.   Merit Award: Communal Operations by Steven Loutherback, Texas Tech. Honor award: Energized Canopy by Romain Dechavanne, Ecole Nationale Superior d’Architecture in Grenoble, France. Winners for professional entries: Citation Award: Piezien Circuit by Modus Studio, Fayetteville, Arkansas. Merit Award: Nexus by Dialog in Vancouver, Canada. Merit Award: Fog Catcher by LITTLE in Los Angeles. For more information on the Architecture at Zero competition, see the competition website.
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Time to experiment anew: David Benjamin on embodied energy and design

Buildings are ideas made physical. They carry silent histories. They manifest culture, values, and technologies. And they also embody environmental impact. In terms of numbers, buildings account for about one-third of the world’s solid waste, energy consumption, and carbon emissions. They are serious and un-ignorable. The physical presence of buildings has always been imposing, and now the making of buildings has become imposing in a new way. The energy story involves a striking twist: in the past fifty years, operational energy—defined as the energy for things like heating, cooling, and lighting—has actually declined as a percentage of total energy consumption in buildings. At the same time, embodied energy—defined as the sum of all energy required to extract raw materials and then produce, transport, and assemble the elements of a building—has rapidly increased. This makes embodied energy an increasingly urgent topic for architecture. But where exactly is all of this embodied energy? How is it calculated? What are the forces involved? How is embodied energy actionable? And how might architects design with it? Perhaps one clue is time. Maybe architectural materials should no longer be considered static and permanent, but instead dynamic and continually transforming. And architects will actively design these transformations. They will study where matter has been, specify how it takes shape in building blocks, and plan where it ends up going. In addition to managing the technical performance of energy, architects should choreograph the acts of embodiment and dis-embodiment—and ultimately re-design the experience of time. Embodied energy is complex, and no single formula or framework is sufficient to encapsulate it. As architecture, engineering, and construction navigate the latest materials, technologies, politics, and environmental outlooks—as well as the increasingly important intersection of quantitative and qualitative factors in design—there has never been a better time to discard default thinking and experiment anew. David Benjamin is Founding Principal of The Living and Assistant Professor at Columbia University Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation (GSAPP), where he has organized the symposium Embodied Energy and Design on April 22. Columbia GSAPP's Embodied Energy Pilot Project is supported by Oldcastle BuildingEnvelope®. Visualizations by Accurat, based on research by David Benjamin and the Embodied Energy Pilot Project at Columbia GSAPP.  
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Ford sets its sights on a radical new high-tech Headquarters

This month, Ford motorcar company will break ground on a new complex as part of a major upgrade to its 60-year old Dearborn campus in Michigan. New buildings, located in two campus' designed by Michigan-based architecture firm SmithGroupJJR, will see a fifty-percent reduction in energy consumption, save water, and include a new zero-waste, zero-energy, zero-water Sustainability Showcase building. The move comes as Ford attempts to realign their focus within the rapidly changing automobile industry. “As we transition to an auto and a mobility company, we’re investing in our people and the tools they use to deliver our vision,” said Ford President and CEO Mark Fields. “Bringing our teams together in an open, collaborative environment will make our employees’ lives better, speed decision-making and deliver results for both our core and emerging businesses.” https://youtu.be/VOrHhaEnvEM Of the two new campus' in question, one will be devoted to "products" and the other will act as a headquarters. Together they will comprise 70 buildings for 30,000 employees. Within they ten year time span Ford have set their sights on "more than 7.5 million square feet of work space will be rebuilt and upgraded into even more technology-enabled and connected facilities." Within the campus' a network of walkable community with paths, trails, and covered walkways will connect buildings. On the product campus, autonomous vehicles, on-demand shuttles and eBikes will also be available to use. The showpiece however, will be a new state-of-the-art design center that will boast more than 700,000 square feet of space for design studios as well as an outdoor courtyard for work and socializing. Meanwhile, at the second campus, 1.3 million square feet will be transformed to house the Ford World Headquarters and a Ford Credit facility. All in all, the transformation will see an additional 100 acres of green space and 3.8 million square feet of new buildings. Construction is due to begin this month at the Ford Research and Engineering Center (to become the new product campus), while Ford says that they expect most of the work to be done by 2023. Work on the Ford World Headquarters will begin in 2021, being complete by 2026.