Posts tagged with "Sustainability":

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TransformKC Celebrates Public Transit with International Exhibition

TransformKC is underway in Kansas City, and the dozens of projects on display are provoking discussion on topics from public transit to energy infrastructure. A joint effort between the Kansas City Regional Transit Alliance (KCRTA) and the American Institute of Architects Kansas City (AIA KC) Young Architects Forum (YAF), TransformKC curated built and unbuilt work around the topic of “regional mobility” in an attempt to “inspire the public’s imagination.” Explore all of the submissions here. Categories include architecture, infrastructure, planning, transit stations and urban design. The exhibition is on display in the East Hall of Kansas City, Missouri’s Union Station through October 25. Some work is local, like BNIM’s Better Block KC. Part of the 2011 Grand Boulevard Streetscape Plan, Better Block KC “envisions a safe, livable and walkable downtown” that uses complete street concepts. Disclosure: The Architect’s Newspaper is a media sponsor, and AN contributor Gunnar Hand served as the exhibition’s co-chair. Here are a few of the high-profile projects from outside Kansas City: BIG: Loop City Bjarke Ingels Group looks to a new light rail loop connecting 20 development zones around the 4-square-mile inner city of Copenhagen. They propose tying energy and water infrastructure into the rail line, creating “an artery of true urbanity pumping life into the heart of the suburbs.” KPF: Hudson Yards See AN's coverage of Kohn Pedersen Fox’s Hudson Yards towers here. SOM: Denver Union Station Skidmore, Owings and Merrill's plan calls for turning the historic Denver station into a multi-modal transportation network. John Gendall looked into the project for AN's feature on master planning.
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Public Votes University of North Carolina Solar Home as Decathlon Choice

This past weekend, a jury of architects, engineers, and market experts scored Team Austria’s home entry as the winner of the United States Department of Energy Solar Decathlon, a student design competition aimed at educating and encouraging thought about the affordability and efficiency of solar homes. As AN reported, the Team Austria private residential design is environmentally sensitive and easily adaptable, chosen for its overall energy efficiency, attractiveness of design, cost, and comfortable living conditions. However, of the 19 designs by collegiate teams from the United States, Canada, the Czech Republic, and Austria presented in Irvine, California, the public had a dissenting opinion about the Decathlon winner. The People’s Choice Award vote went to UrbanEden from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte; this concrete and glass-based modern structure was the majority’s favorite home entry. UrbanEden is a four-room home designed for ease of indoor to outdoor flexibility. It is envisioned as existing within the urban city of Charlotte and has been designed with materials for noise reduction as well as energy efficiency. The structure is built of geopolymer cement concrete, which the team claims is “one of the first-known uses of a geopolymer mix in a building envelope.” Inside its walls are a series of tubes circulating cool water to remove heat inside the house without a compressor or refrigerant. The entire south wall is constructed of glass windows and leads to an exterior patio that can be covered, weather permitting, by a retractable photovoltaic panel roof. The patio has a vertical garden to provide greenery, privacy, and a potential food source. With these innovative technologies, the entry won third place in the Solar Decathlon Engineering Contest. However, in aesthetics, the home also makes an impression. Light-filled rooms and the easy accessibility to an outdoors terrace provide a balance of nature within an urban environment. With the beauty and comfort of its design, the DOE believes that UrbanEden earns its People’s Choice Award. Solar Decathlon comments: “UrbanEden is a house people can imagine themselves living in. A house that could easily become a home.” All Images Courtesy DOE Solar Decathlon.
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Cities as Lab: Designing the Innovation Economy

At the end of September, the AIA released “Cities as Lab”, a report stipulating how innovative design can help strengthen modern urban America. Presented during the National Leadership Speaker Series in Washington D.C., it stressed how resilient cities are better suited to address upcoming social, economic, and physical challenges. The report is part of a larger framework looking to guide the international development agenda for decades to come. As a whole, it seeks to fuel the progress of critical sustainable programs around the world. The AIA report states that by incorporating innovative design and technology within their internal structure, cities would have the power to lead the way toward the future. Urban enclaves are being reconfigured in order to respond to changing realities and contemporary human and economic needs. Some of the key examples stated in the report include the Boston Innovation District, North Carolina's Research Triangle Plan, and the Downtown Project in Las Vegas. These programs focus on a series of urban experiments seeking to promote knowledge exchange and economic opportunities, to develop new technological hubs, to mitigate the ecological footprint through sustainable design, and to introduce new architectural archetypes in order to foster creative place-making. All of these ideas are critical linchpins for visionary and sustainable planning. In its concluding remarks, the report indicates that intelligent design and wise policy choices help create places that are suited to meet the needs of future populations, to respond to economic challenges, and to manage natural disasters. The general idea is to create more resilient communities and sustainable infrastructures that will be able to sustain future economic and physical challenges. The initiative focuses on ways to create more valuable, healthy, secure and sustainable built environments by exploring solutions to pressing issues that urban enclaves are faced with.
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World's Tallest Vertical Garden Planned for Sydney's One Central Park Tower

Defying the standards of conventional landscaping, living walls take vegetated ground cover to the vertical extreme. For the past 30 years, French botanist and green enthusiast Patrick Blanc has made a quantum leap forward in the art of gardening by designing and building these living walls all over the globe. Blanc's latest project—One Central Park Tower—is in Sydney, Australia, where nature’s tranquil features join forces with dynamic city life. The project is a collaborative effort between Blanc and Jean Nouvel. When completed, the major mixed-use urban renewal housing plan will boast the world’s tallest vertical garden. The building consists of two adjoining residential towers connected by terraced gardens, built atop a retail center. Each tower measures 380 feet in height and consists of shops, cafes, restaurants, offices, 624 apartments, and 38 luxury penthouse suites. Over the years, Blanc has perfected the art of the vertical garden by using synthetic moss instead of soil for the growing medium. At One Central Park, he envisions covering up 50 percent of the building’s facade by incorporating 1,200 square feet of plants stretching from the 2nd floor to the 33rd floor. On the 24th floor, an immense sky garden projects 100 feet out over the park below. At night, the cantilever will act as a canvas for an LED light installation designed by artist Yann Kersale, with vines running up its supporting cables. The lower part of the cantilever will be equipped with an apparatus containing a heliostat, which will reflect sunlight down onto the surrounding gardens and naturally illuminating the building. The lush green tapestry of the structure's facade will be entwined with the foliage of the adjacent park in order to replicate the natural cliffs of the Blue Mountains, which are located in the Western part of Sydney. By using plants and natural sunlight, the design projects to reduce energy consumption and will help cut down the city's greenhouse gas emissions. One Central Park represents a shift towards a new contemporary design era; one that encapsulates all that the age of living and breathing architecture has to offer. Estimated completion date is set for January 2014. Images courtesy Atelier Jean Nouvel / Patrick Blanc / Fraser Properties. one-central-park-tower-syndey-01 one-central-park-tower-syndey-02 one-central-park-tower-syndey-03 one-central-park-tower-syndey-04 one-central-park-tower-syndey-05 one-central-park-tower-syndey-06 one-central-park-tower-syndey-07 one-central-park-tower-syndey-08 one-central-park-tower-syndey-09 one-central-park-tower-syndey-10 one-central-park-tower-syndey-11 one-central-park-tower-syndey-12   Image below: Courtesy the messiah website. one-central-park-tower-syndey-13 sydney
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Facades+ Headliners Usher in The Future of Performance

There's a lot to be excited about in the jam-packed schedule of intimate dialog and tech workshops on day two of AN and Enclos’ upcoming Facades+ PERFORMANCE conference. But don't forget about the exciting keynote-speakers headlining day one! Industry leaders Stefan Behnisch of Benisch Architekten and Gerardo Salinas of Rojkind Arquitectos will set the tone as they discuss the effects of emerging design, fabrication, and construction techniques on building facades in our current technological, environmental, and economic landscape. Leading innovators from across the AEC industry will be on-hand to redefine sustainable facade performance, so don’t miss this rare opportunity. Register now and mark it down on your calendar: Facades+ PERFORMANCE, October 24th-25th at the Illinois Institute of Technology’s Main Campus in Chicago. “For me, performance means going beyond the technical behavior of a facade or technical system to incorporate new-found relationships between technology, fabrication, and understanding the full potential and use of the local craftsmanship to obtain the desired results," Salinas told AN. "At Rojkind Arquitectos, we look at every project as a state of active awareness fueled by continuous research, cross-pollination and context sensitivity. Rather than focusing on 'all' we selectively choose a context and adapt our thinking to recognize opportunity under those parameters.” Before returning to his native Mexico in 2010 to become the first partner at Rojkind Arquitectos, Gerardo Salinas worked on several master planning and institution projects with Ellerbe Becket, acted as Senior Project Designer with HNTB and Senior Associate at Anderson Mason Dale Architects, and demonstrated his expertise and dedication to sustainable design as a member of the U.S. Green Building Council. In his keynote address, “The Economics of Fabrication,” Salinas will discuss how, by viewing the users' needs as sources of inspiration, his firm is able to construct designs that maximize potential while maintaining attainability. “The facade as a building’s skin is becoming a more and more complex element in architectural development,” said Stefan Benisch, founder and principal of Behnisch Architekten. “Considering that the number of trades and different materials within a building is decreasing, and the remaining, fewer trades will become more complex, the facade then needs to become a highly sophisticated, complex, integrated element, not unlike what the skin represents for the body.” In his keynote address, “Techinical and Architectural Expectations: The rapidly developing role of the building skin in the wake of new technologies,” Bensich will bring his decades’ worth of knowledge and experience to the Facades+ stage. Through his award winning work, like the Norddeutsche Landesbank in Hannover, Behnisch has infused dynamic, eye-catching design with forward-thinking sustainable technologies to create buildings that provide maximum benefit to their users, the public realm, and the natural environment. Join him on October 24 to see the projects that are paving the way for the next era of sustainable facade design and construction. Reserve your space now to hear more from these and other groundbreaking professionals on the future of high performance facades and the technologies that are revolutionizing our built environment, only at Facades+ PERFORMANCE
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Cory Brugger of Morphosis Redefines Performance at Facades+ Chicago

Anticipation is growing for AN and Enclos’ eagerly awaited Facades + PERFORMANCE conference, touching down in Chicago from October 24th to 25th. Leading innovators from the architecture, engineering, and construction industries will share their insights on the latest in cutting-edge facade technologies that are redefining what performance means for 21st Century architecture. Don’t miss your chance to join Cory Brugger, Director of Technology for Morphosis Architects, as he is joined by a group of industry specialists to lead an in-depth dialog workshop on expanding the idea of performance in the design, engineering, and fabrication of innovative building systems. "Traditionally, performance has been defined in singular terms," Brugger told AN, "but when it comes to delivering architecture, it can encompass everything from energy usage to fabrication technique. For us, performance is multifaceted and interdisciplinary. We have found that technology provides a platform for incorporating a variety of performance criteria in our design process, allowing us to create innovative architecture, like the Cornell NYC Tech project on Roosevelt Island." Set to open its doors in 2017, Morphosis’ winning design for the highly publicized Cornell Tech campus will be breaking ground on Roosevelt Island in the coming year. As part of this ambitious, 2.1 million square foot development, Brugger and his colleagues at Morphosis hope to earn LEED-Platinum certification by with their 150,000 square foot academic building by utilizing cutting-edge modeling techniques and an array of sustainable technologies. "In general, we are designing for extremely high EUI (energy use intensity) goals, which are being accomplished through the use of comprehensive models that integrate mechanical systems, day-lighting analysis, and architectural assemblies," said Brugger. "This effort is being supported by a 140,000+ square foot PV array that is integral to both the performance and aesthetics of the design. Other technologies include high performance facade systems, smart building technology, and geo-thermal wells." In conjunction with master-planners SOM and landscape architects James Corner Field Operations, Morphosis are working to create a new model for high-tech education in the information age by extending the definition of performance beyond traditional notions to incorporate far-sighted social and technological considerations. Reserve your space at Facades+ PERFORMANCE now to take part in an intimate discussion. Brugger will be joined my Paul Martin (Zahner), Tyler Goss (CASE), Matt Herman (Burro Happold), and Marty Doscher (Dassault Systèmes ) on Friday, October 25th at the Illinois Institute of Technology Main Campus in Chicago. Don’t forget to check out our other exciting key-notes, symposia, and workshops on the complete Facades+ PERFORMANCE schedule.
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Unveiled> Philippe Starck and Riko Design Series of Pre-Fab Homes

[beforeafter]starck_prefab_03a starck_prefab_03b[/beforeafter]   World-renowned designer Philippe Starck has earned yet another feather for his cap in a recent collaboration with Riko, a European manufacturer of sustainable wooden buildings. Stemming from a drive to develop industrially manufactured homes that fulfill housing needs across the globe, the pair created P.A.T.H. (Prefabricated Accessible Technological Homes), a line of 34 turnkey homes merging timeless design, advanced technology, functionality, and sustainability. P.A.T.H. can be customized from layout and interior finishes to distinctive facades and roofing. [beforeafter]starck_prefab_02a starck_prefab_02b[/beforeafter]   Each P.A.T.H. model is characterized by Starck’s signature design, yet homeowners choose each aspect to create their unique spaces. The pre-fab homes provide a range of housing models that vary in size, number of rooms, levels and floor plans. A configurator allows homeowners to browse and select their preferred models. In the early planning stage, all details of the home are meticulously engineered and rendered. Then, bulky building elements such as walls and roof structures are prefabricated, filled with insulation and finished with closing panels in a strictly controlled fabrication facility. The prefabrication system shrinks the amount of time necessary for on-site assembly, which takes several weeks following the completion of the initial infrastructure and foundation. Two months are necessary for electrical and mechanical installations and to outfit the home with the selected finishes. Total time from start to finish is six months. The most sophisticated sustainable construction engineering has been utilized in developing P.A.T.H.  Only high-quality, environmentally friendly materials are used throughout the production and building process. Wood has been selected as the system’s main building material since it is natural and renewable, giving the homes zero-energy or even positive-energy potential. [beforeafter]starck_prefab_01b starck_prefab_01a[/beforeafter]
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San Francisco Facades+ Performance: Day 1 Speaker Highlights

San Francisco Facades+ PERFORMANCE is only three weeks away! Connect with other architects, fabricators, developers, consultants, and other design professionals and earn up to 8 AIA LU credits per day at the conference, presented by AN and Enclos, July 11 to 12, 2013. Invaluable information, networking opportunities, and hands-on workshops are on the lineup for this year’s two-day event. The symposium on Day 1 involves exciting presentations and discussion-based panels. Here are just a few of the speaker highlights on the agenda for Facades+. Claire Maxfield, Director of Atelier Ten, in conjunction with Jeffrey Vaglio of Enclos, will offer introductory remarks on Day 1. Her expertise includes facade optimization and water systems. Ecoarchitect Ken Yeang of Hamzah & Yeang is an architect, planner and ecologist known for his distinctive green aesthetic. He trained at the AA School and received a PhD from Cambridge, and he will present a keynote address at the symposium titled "Ecoarchitecture: Living Facades and Architecture." Edward Peck of Thornton Tomasetti will speak about The Components of Performance on Day 1. Peck has over 15 years of experience in architecture, building skin technologies and building systems fabrication. Gary Handel, Founding Partner of Handel Architects, has directed the expansion of his firm to over 150 architects, designers, and planners since its start in 1994. Handel focuses on enriching the urban environment and will present a keynote address on Day 1 titled "Glass Without Guilt." Stephen Selkowitz, Senior Advisor of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, has over 35 years of experience in building energy performance and sustainable design. With a focus on RD&D of energy efficient glazing and facade technologies, he will give a lecture titled "Measured Building Energy Performace: First Results from the New York Times HQ Building." Don't miss out on conversing with some of the world's top design professionals. Early Bird registration has been extended—register online today!
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Brooklyn Navy Yard's Duggal Greenhouse by Studios GO Officially Opens

New York entrepreneur Baldev Duggal and Studios GO architect Gregory Okshteyn have brought new life to an old building in Brooklyn’s Navy Yard. The 100,000-square-foot, eco-friendly project called the Duggal Greenhouse was once a deserted, asbestos-stricken eyesore. Now it's a state-of-the-art venue where Duggal Visual Solutions tests and manufactures an assortment of green products. The $10 million retrofit of Duggal Greenhouse preserved the existing structure, while fully modernized it. Duggal Greenhouse is the hub of Duggal Energy Solutions, a corporation dedicated to resolving global electricity, water, and agriculture problems. Duggal first began researching energy, since the green initiatives he cared most about require power. Lumi Solair, the company’s first product, is an off-grid, solar-powered streetlight. More than 50 of these lamps are installed in the Navy Yard. Lumi Solair is also installed on the Atlantic City boardwalk, where it was the only streetlamp to continue functioning through Hurricane Sandy last year. With a backyard that opens up to a riverside terrace with scenic Manhattan views, the Greenhouse is not only open for business schemes. Heineken held a 1,300-person celebration in the building to launch a new bottle, and Beyonce has rehearsed in the space. Duggal’s Navy Yard venture began over a decade ago with a single 10,000-square-foot space. Now, he owns 10 times the space across seven buildings. Duggal plans to obtain an additional property neighboring the Greenhouse, where he wants to build a cafe, eco-lounge, and urban farm on the roof. The Navy Yard played an active part in helping Duggal grow. CEO Andrew Kimball, whose group contributed $500,000 to the Greenhouse and saved more than $600,000 by utilizing Lumi lamps, has called him a creative genius.
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Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects Breaks Ground in Shanghai

On May 30, Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects, the East China Architecture and Design Institute (ECADI), and the Shanghai Expo Construction Development Company announced the start of construction for a new 164,000-square-foot mixed-use development on the 2010 Shanghai Expo site. The project, known as Green Valley, will transform the former industrial dockyard into a commercial district of shops, restaurants, and offices. The design features two main buildings positioned on either side of a central courtyard. Each incorporates hanging gardens in glass-enclosed atria that will be visible from the street. The buildings will offer high standards of finish and sustainability, both in terms of environmental performance as well as low operating costs. The design focuses on openness and convenience so those working in the buildings will have superb views of the hanging gardens and the city. The expo site itself will maintain the ample green space, walking paths, and cultural attractions left after the Expo concluded and the pavilions were demolished. Green Valley is the start of new permanent development on the site. Green Valley is one of four projects by Danish studio Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects transpiring within Shanghai. Each is a redevelopment of the once industrial area along the waterfront. Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects won the competition to design the project last year. It is located next to the iconic Chinese pavilion. Completion is expected in 2015.
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Paris Trots Out Black Sheep as a Lawnmower Alternative

Since Wednesday, four black ewes have a new home, and new jobs as groundskeepers on a small patch of municipal land in Paris. Fenced in on a half-acre lawn in front of the city’s archives building in the 19th Arrondissement, the New York Times reported that the sheep are part of a new “eco-grazing” program which aims to cut out loud, gas-guzzling lawnmowers and toxic herbicides in favor of a more agrarian solution. If all goes well at the archives, city officials have plans to bring more mouton to pastures across Paris. Their hilly home on the eastern edge of the city is a near perfect paddock for the animals, Marcel Collet, the farmer overseeing the sheep, assured the Times. The special two-foot-tall sheep, known as Ouessant, were brought from the Breton coast and selected for the hardiness and diminutive size. Contained by a three foot electric fence and monitored by a lone guard, the sheep face few threats aside from domestic dogs and the hazard of tipping over (if a sheep falls, someone needs to be there to flip it back over). “Otherwise, it risks smothering itself,”  archives director Angés Masson quipped to the Times. While she is happy with her new employees, they weren’t exactly what she was hoping for, telling the Times that, “Myself, I wanted a donkey.” Others also have their doubts about the sheep, as some worry that they may endanger the local biodiversity. Four distinct types of orchids have been found on the sheep’s new pasture, but scientists will stand by to monitor the interaction between the animals and plant life. The sheep are part of a larger greening effort by Mayor Betrand Delanoë, who has brought bike- and car-sharing programs, bike and bus lanes, and pedestrian pathways to the city since being elected in 2001. At a mere $335 for the four, the sheep provide both a sustainable and affordable solution to Paris landscaping needs.
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Empire Stores in DUMBO Might Finally Get a Make-Over

The Brooklyn Bridge Park Corporation issued an RFP last week seeking qualified developers to revamp the post-Civil War Empire Stores warehouse in DUMBO, according to Crain's. The adaptive reuse project, originally drafted in 2002, has been postponed several times over the last decade due to a lack of developers willing to address the building’s “scary structural issues.” Proposals, which are due on December 10th, could add up to 70,000 square feet and two additional stories to the existing buildings. Projects must be community friendly and address design challenges at the intersection of preservation and sustainability.