Posts tagged with "Supertall":

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Viñoly's latest Manhattan skyscraper will only be half the size of his 432 Park tower, but that's still really tall

Rafael Viñoly's latest Manhattan luxury tower almost seems quaint next to his 1,396-foot-tall, trashcan-inspired 432 Park AvenueNY YIMBY has published renderings of the architect's 281 Fifth Avenue in NoMad, which is only about half the size of his Park Avenue behemoth. To be clear, this does not mean the new tower is short—it weighs in at 705 feet tall—but it does reinforce that 432 Park Avenue is really, really tall. As for its design? On its most basic level,281 Fifth Avenue's limited renderings released so far show a glassy box—a lot like other recent New York City skyscrapers. The tower sets itself apart with a series of horizontal spandrel bands between rows of ribbon windows that increase the amount of glass as it ascends—much like a slinky being pulled up from the ground. According to permits filed with the New York City Department of Buildings, the building contains 141 condominiums and nearly 8,000 square feet of retail on the first and second floor. Demolition is currently underway at the site, and the building is slated to be completed in 2018.
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Was Rafael Viñoly's 432 Park tower inspired by an architect-designed trashcan?

AN had the unique opportunity to walk around the top floor of the supertall 432 Park Avenue tower, where the full-floor penthouse with a $95 million view of Central Park is nearing completion. A Saudi billionaire, Fawaz Al Hokair, was recently announced as the buyer. Ironically, The Real Deal has reported this week that it was also announced by one of the architects—at a Cornell Center for Real Estate and Finance lecture in December—that the Rafael Viñoly design was inspired by, wait for it, a trashcan. 432-park-trash-can2 It's no ordinary trash can, however. The alleged inspiration is a design by Viennese Secession/ Wiener Werkstätte mastermind Josef Hoffmann. His gridded designs represented a new rational, rigorous way of composing objects in the beginnings of modern industrial design. Today, apparently, they are being copied at a larger scale for entire building. The geometric purity of the tower originally looked to us like it came from Aldo Rossi, but Hoffmann makes more sense, especially given the urban context/political ambiguity of the building. In the lecture, Harry Macklowe, who co-developed the building with the CIM Group, revealed that Renzo Piano was also considered for the tower but didn’t work out. The idea for a tall building with a pure form came from Piano, and Macklowe carried that idea forward through the project. “Renzo Piano had said to me—if you have a pure architectural form like a square and you uphold the integrity of that architectural form you will build a beautiful building,” Macklowe to the Real Deal. “That stayed in my mind, and I had considered Renzo Piano for the architect, but it didn’t work out for several reasons.” While the world's super-elite who will soon call the tower home likely would snub the idea of living like an albeit more sophisticated Oscar the Grouch, they might do well to pick up their own Hoffmann trashcan, available for a cool $225 from the Neue Galerie.
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Another supertall tower to rise in Manhattan's increasingly crowded supertall district

If you guessed that the newest luxury tower planned for Midtown, Manhattan would be very tall, skinny, and glassy then you, wise architectural observer, are correct. But don't be too proud of your guessing skills—predicting that a luxury New York City skyscraper will be a glass-wrapped giant is like guessing Hillary Clinton will be the Democratic nominee. It's too easy is what we're saying. Without further ado, we present to you 1 Park Lane, a 1,210-foot-tall glass condo tower revealed by New York YIMBY and designed by Handel Architects. The new building will replace Central Park South's Helmsley Park Lane Hotel which did not receive landmark status last year. "Windows will measure 10×14 feet, while ceilings on every floor will stand 15’5" tall," wrote YIMBY. "It appears the developers will maximize views by gutting the vast majority of the existing Helmsley Building and turning it into an enormous foyer, which will allow them to stack the extra floorspace up top." After a few massing setbacks, the building begins it rise. On the way up, there are four seemingly double height notches that are filled-in with plantings and get illuminated at night. The effect is similar to the passthroughs at Viñoly's 432 Park Avenue a few blocks away. The building is expected to be completed in 2020, so get those checkbooks ready, global elite!
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Take a look at the view from the tippy top of Rafael Viñoly's 432 Park, the supertall tower that will soon house the world's billionaires

AN got a rare look at the penthouse of 432 Park, Rafael Viñoly's soon-to-be-tallest residential building in the western hemisphere. After a six-minute ride on the construction lift, expansive, $95 million views open up in a 360 degree panorama from large square windows along all four sides of the full-floor apartment. While the building is still under construction, it has already topped out some 1,396 feet above New York City's sidewalks below. The 85-story tower is expected to be completed early next year, but some of the lower floors will be available for move-in this fall, if you are interested. Deborah Berke is handling the interior architecture in the building. Here are some pictures from the six penthouses at the top of Viñoly’s incredibly tall building on Manhattan’s Billionaires' Row.
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In just a few years, this tower by Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill will be the tallest residential building on Planet Earth

The tallest of Manhattan's rising supertall towers has been revealed—and believe it or not, the building that will make New York's current crop of skyscrapers look like walkups is very, very glassy. Real estate blog New York YIMBY obtained the first official renderings for 217 West 57th Street—the under-construction building that has been dubbed the "Nordstrom Tower" for the department store that will occupy its base. Chicago-based Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill designed the tower and Extell is developing the project. The roof of the hotel and condo tower will reach 1,479 feet, but the building doesn't stop there—no, it just keeps climbing. When all is said and done, Nordstrom Tower's spire will stand at 1,775 feet tall—just one foot below One World Trade Center's very historically-minded height of 1,776 feet (spire included). But since One World Trade has a significantly taller spire, the 57th Street supertall is actually the bigger building. And since Midtown's elevation above sea level is about 70 feet higher than Lower Manhattan, YIMBY noted that the new building will actually reach 1,850 feet above sea level—making it the tallest residential building on planet earth. Since the building won't be completed until 2018, it's probably best for people to get their Central Park sunshine now, as the new crop of 57th Street towers will be throwing some literal shade on New York's backyard.
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Jeanne Gang, Wanda Group unveil new renderings for supertall Wanda Vista tower in Chicago

Studio Gang's Wanda Tower may climb even higher than originally planned. New renderings revealed Monday night show the tower topping out at 93 stories instead of the previous 88. At 1,144 feet, the tower, whose development is being bankrolled by Beijing-based Wanda Group, would be the third-tallest tower in Chicago (provided it fits the standards of the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat, who arbitrate such matters.) Formally dubbed Wanda Vista, the $950 million tower will seek LEED Silver certification and is anticipated to open in 2019. The new renderings reveal a continuum of blue-green glass along the building's vertical profile. Gang said Monday the design is meant to mimic the reflection of light off Lake Michigan. The new design retains the massing of three tall, thin towers stepping toward the East, but gone are the balconies along the north and south facades. With more than 1.8 million square feet of real estate, the development will include 405 luxury condominiums and 169 hotel rooms. The Chinese real estate giants announced their plans last year without listing an architect; the design team was soon revealed to be local firms Studio Gang Architects and bKL Architecture. Chicago-based Lakeshore East, which has worked with bKL and Gang to develop the Lakeshore East neighborhood, owns a 10 percent stake in the project.
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Wanda's plans for a new Studio Gang–designed Chicago supertall tower come into focus

City officials laid to rest Wednesday some, but not all, of the supertall rumors swirling around Chicago since July. Beijing-based real estate giant Wanda Commercial Properties is indeed planning what would be the city's third tallest building for 375 East Wacker Drive in the Lakeshore East neighborhood. Since news of the ambitious project first broke this summer, the design has visibly shifted. The project, dubbed Wanda Vista, is now 88 stories instead of 89. Its facade has traded sky blues for shiny silver. The highest of its three volumes is now the westernmost, stepping down towards Lake Michigan instead of up, as originally rendered. The form is still a cluster of three high-rises, made of stacked frustums—cut-off pyramid shapes—that interlock and terminate in green roofs. The middle tower would still straddle North Field Boulevard. Any real detail, however, remains obscured, as the projects' designers, Studio Gang Architects and bKL Architecture, are staying mum. Though the project awaits approval from 42nd Ward Alderman Brendan Reilly and City Council, its developers hope to break ground in 2016. Plans for the mixed-use building include a five-star hotel, apartments, and retail, potentially to open by 2018. The 88-story project is estimated to cost $900 million, a sum not unreasonable for Wang Jianlin, Wanda's chief executive and the richest man in mainland China. Chicago-based Magellan Development, which has worked with bKL and Gang to develop the Lakeshore East neighborhood, owns a 10 percent stake in the project.
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New renderings and details of SHoP's supertall Midtown tower

Despite concerns that New York City’s high-end housing bubble is about to burst, the supertall towers that have come to symbolize that upper-echelon of the market keep coming, one after the other. Now, with One57 open, and 432 Park topped off, SHoP’s 111 W. 57th Street—widely seen as the most attractive of the bunch—is preparing to head skyward. As the tower begins its roughly 1,400-foot climb, new renderings and details of the project have surfaced. The new information about the highly-anticipated tower was divulged by Simon Koster, principal at the JDS Development Group, at the Municipal Arts Society's 2014 Summit for New York. CityRealty's 6sqft blog was there and reports back on the latest plans. Along with a floorplan of a typical unit in the building, 6sqft unveiled some new, detailed images of the tower's skin. On its east and west-facing sides, 111 W. 57th,  is clad in a terra cotta panels separated by glass, and bronze filigree details. The other two sides of the building are primarily glass—to provide optimal views of Central Park to the north and Lower Manhattan to the south. For residents of 111 W. 57th Street, this presents a conundrum: which view to pick. Just kidding, no it doesn't—apartments take up entire floors. When complete, the tower won't just be one of the tallest buildings in New York, it will be the skinniest skyscraper in the world with a floor plate of only 60 feet by 80 feet.
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UPDATE: Related wrests control of Chicago Spire site from Garrett Kelleher

spire UPDATE [3:00 P.M.]: Related now has control of the Spire site, after embattled developer Garrett Kelleher transferred the deed Monday night. Related withdrew their claim in U.S. Bankruptcy Court following the transfer, reported the Chicago Tribune. They haven't released plans for development or sale of the notorious site, but President Curt Bailey issued this statement:
We are pleased to have resolution on 400 N. Lake Shore Drive, the site of the former Chicago Spire project.  We recognize the importance of this site to the City of Chicago and look forward to creating an architecturally significant and thoughtful development befitting this premier location. We are proud to have a long track-record of developing landmark buildings with world-class architects like 840 N. Lake Shore Drive, 500 N. Lake Shore Drive, Park Tower, 340 on the Park and most recently, 111 W. Wacker Drive.  We look forward to continuing that legacy on this marquee site.
-- Halloween came and went last Friday, and with it so may have developer Garrett Kelleher's chance at reviving the Chicago Spire, an ambitious supertall project that faltered during the recession and left an empty cofferdam at 400 North Lake Shore Drive. Under the terms of an earlier settlement in bankruptcy court, Kelleher's company, Shelbourne North Water Street, was required to make a payment to Related Midwest by midnight Saturday. When it did not receive the payment, Related promptly filed papers with U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Chicago to wrest control of the prime real estate from Kelleher. Last year Related moved to buy the dormant project's mounting debt, but part of Related's development team later sued Kelleher for more than $95 million in guarantees for the project. Kelleher surprised many observers in February by offering bullish statements to the media and stirring rumors of a second chance for the Santiago Calatrava–designed skyscraper. Friday's missing payment undercuts those claims. As the Chicago Tribune's Mary Ellen Podmolik reported:
Related, arguing that Shelbourne breached an already approved settlement and the confirmed bankruptcy plan by not making a payment or handing over the deed, wants U.S. Bankruptcy Court Judge Janet Baer to order Shelbourne to relinquish the deed to the 2.2-acre site.
It looks increasingly unlikely that the Spire will rise again. Under Related's control, however, the downtown location could see some sort of development—if not the audacious starchitecture for which it was intended. A court hearing on the motion is scheduled for the morning of November 4.
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Talking tall buildings in Shanghai

In September the Chicago-based Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) gathered high-minded designers, developers and engineers for a conference in Shanghai. CTBUH, which often partners with AN on conferences, including our own Facades+ events, invited me to serve as a special media correspondent for the conference, held September 16–19. I spent most of the time conducting video interviews with the symposium guests, which we'll post here on the AN blog as they become available. For now, here' a quick overview of the topics discussed. The theme of this year's conference was “Future Cities: Towards Sustainable Vertical Urbanism.” It was an especially relevant topic given the venue—held in the elegant, SOM-designed Jin Mao Tower, the conference looked for lessons (and warnings) in the kind of supertall, super-dense development that turned the Lujiazui area of Shanghai's Pudong district from farmland into a world financial center in just 20 years. Symposium presenters tackled sustainability from several angles. Matthew Clifford, head of energy and sustainability services for North Asia at JLL, stressed building operation and management is as important as design when it comes to energy use and building performance. Cathy Yang, manager of Taipei 101, recounted how “greening” the 101-story building did not turn a profit until the initiative's sixth year, but then made up for it in just three years. The Taiwanese supertall remains the largest LEED Platinum–certified building in the world. Jianping Gu of Shanghai Tower Construction and Development espoused the benefits of the “stereoscopic” form of his building, which at 2,073 feet is set to become the tallest building in China upon completion next year. “If you compare Shanghai Tower to Taipei 101Petronas Towers, those were all isolated," Gu said. "There were already two towers in the vicinity when we started. We had to pay particular attention to harmonizing with those buildings. We consider this an issue of sustainability.” But towering, monumental architecture may not be for everyone. David Gianotten, an OMA partner heading the firm's Hong Kong office, told me OMA gets so many briefs seeking “iconic” design that the word has begun to lose its meaning. “If everything's special, then nothing's special,” he said. That debate continued onto the conference floor, where developers discussed how China's third- and fourth-tier cities should embrace the tall building boom—or whether they should at all. On the conference's final day, Mun Summ Wong of Singapore-based WOHA talked about the psychological environment of horizontal cities, and how tall buildings should better embrace the human scale. “The idea is to inject more urban life into the high-rise city,” Wong said. “We introduce horizontal movement in the high-rise building because it changes the dynamic. When you talk to the people next to you in an ordinary high-rise, it is considered rude. But in the street, you talk to people, build relationships and bonds.” Similarly, Yang Wu of the Bund Finance Center warned of the risks of homogeneous skylines. “When I open my eyes in the morning and I am in Shenzhen, I still think I am in Shanghai because they look the same,” he said. “[China is] duplicating buildings and the mistakes of the West. There is focus on building bizarre and tall buildings but ignorance of the connotations–resulting in cold buildings for cold cities. As a developer, I call on architects: you need to have your own independent ideas that bring vitality.” You can read more about the conference on CTBUH's website. Check back here as we post video interviews.
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New Drawings Appear for 225 West 57th Street - The Tallest Residential Building in the World

New details have emerged on New York’s latest, tallest, super-tall skyscraper—the Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill–designed tower rising on, where else, 57th Street. Real estate blog NY YIMBY has uncovered new drawings for 225 West 57th Street, which will rise to a height within one foot of One World Trade Center. The 1,775-foot-tall tower, known as the Nordstrom Tower for the store that will anchor its base, will have a glass curtain wall accentuated by aluminum louvers and steel fins. There have been limited renderings for the project from the start, and the latest drawings only hint at what is next. Here's what we do know: as noted by YIMBY, at its height, Nordstrom Tower has a higher roof than the Willis Tower in Chicago and is slated to become the tallest residential building… in the world.