Posts tagged with "Storefront for Art and Architecture":

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Architectural Stars Align at Storefront for Art & Architecture Benefit

The architecture social calendar in New York includes a bewildering array of benefits, parties, fundraisers, and charity auctions. But the yearly event that brings out the most party loving architects is the Storefront for Art and Architecture's benefit and art auction. The Storefront always gets the most fabulous venues for its events and this year's was beyond spectacular: the 1893 Bowery Savings Bank. Designed by Stanford White of McKim, Mead and White the space takes up a huge through block site between the Bowery, Grand, and Elizabeth streets. The interior is a riot of colorful Siena marble walls, mosaic floors, faux marble scagliola columns, coffered ceilings, and stairs and skylights made of cast iron. This nearly indescribable landmark was the perfect venue for Storefront's grand director Eva Franch and even more grand board president Charles Renfro to introduce the gala's honored guests Olafur Eliasson and the composer, vocalist, and choreographer Meredith Monk. They appeared on a high balcony and spotlight like opera stars, talked about the importance of the Storefront to the arts community in the city and asked everyone to bid aggressively on the art works in the auction. Robert M. Rubin, Storefront board member, bid on a small Louis Kahn sketch. Other works by Ann Hamilton, Kiki Smith, Terence Gower, and Denise Scott Brown all sold to eager buyers. Bernard Tschumi, who donated a print from his Manhattan Transcript series, also bid on and, with his wife Kate Linker, gazumped all other bidders to take away a magical Meredith Monk print of a musical score. The event bought in a total of $344,370 to the Storefront.  
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Van Alen Insitute Announces Ground/Works Competition Finalists

The Van Alen Institute has announced three finalists for its competition Ground/Work, which called on emerging designers and architects to reimagine the institute’s New York storefront. In celebration of Van Alen’s 120th anniversary, the competition furthers the institute’s ambition to bring innovative architectural ideas into the public dialog by reframing the organization’s relation to the street. Young designers were invited to consider the Van Alen's shifting role within New York City through the redesign of its physical space, integrating all of its functions and creating a more visible and accessible presence on the ground floor of 30 West 22nd Street. From over 120 teams, representing more than 350 young designers up to ten years out of school, three finalists were selected: Collective-LOK, EFGH, and Of Possible Architectures. “We are thrilled by the jury’s selections, and look forward to the finalists’ imaginative visions for Van Alen as a center for innovative projects and public programs,” said David van der Leer, Executive Director of Van Alen Institute, in a statement. “Ground/Work is an opportunity to recognize emerging talents in architecture while bringing fresh creativity to the Institute during an exciting period of change.” Finalists were selected by a jury consisting of Stephen Cassell (Architecture Research Office, and Board of Trustees, Van Alen Institute), Winka Dubbeldam (Archi-tectonics, and University of Pennsylvania), Mark Gardner (Jaklitsch/Gardner Architects), Mark Robbins (International Center of Photography, and Board of Trustees, Van Alen Institute), Ada Tolla (LOT-EK), Marc Tsurumaki (LTL Architects), and David van der Leer (Van Alen Institute). The three chosen teams will present their proposals to the jury in September, following which the finalist will have four months to finalize their design before construction is set to begin this winter. The three winning teams each present innovative, interdisciplinary approaches that diverge from the traditional architectural practice, reflecting Van Alen’s mission to support and promote pioneering young designers. Below are self-descriptions of the three firms. Collective–LOK is a team formed by Jon Lott (PARA-Project), William O'Brien Jr. (WOJR), and Michael Kubo (over,under). Our approach is shaped by an architectural mindset, but draws on a broad range of interests — historical, conceptual, curatorial, and cross-disciplinary — in order to shape discourse on design in the public realm. Our interest in the potentials of collaboration is rooted in an engagement with the history and methods of architectural practice as scholars, educators, and practitioners. We take inspiration from the rich legacy of firms that have shared a commitment to collaboration as the means to create a socially and culturally progressive architecture. EFGH (Hayley Eber, Frank Gesualdi, Spencer Lapp, Pat Ruggiero, and Ani Ivanova) is a New York-based architectural design practice founded in 2007 by principals Hayley Eber and Frank Gesualdi. The studio actively engages projects across scales: from the projective design of large urban sites to innovation at the scale of custom furniture, and everything in between. We explore design as an extensive network of interrelated and often competing issues, interrogating them along the way. Our design process reflects an intense curiosity mixed with a drive for experimentation. Of Possible Architectures (OPA) (Vincent Appel, Ethan Lay-Sleeper, Jaime Magaliff, Paul Miller, Heather Murtagh, Franklin Romero Jr., Emily Ruopp, in collaboration with Jay Atherton) is a creative practice working across spheres of architecture, social sculpture, large scale public art, and urbanism. OPA is committed to architecture as an act of cultural production and focuses on radically innovative, often self-initiated, cultural projects. What we do is based on optimistic speculations for how people and the built environment affect one another.
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On View> Aircraft Carrier at the Storefront for Art & Architecture through April 27

aircraft_carrier_02 Aircraft Carrier Storefront for Art and Architecture 97 Kenmare Street Through April 27 Aircraft Carrier examines the dramatic changes that occurred in Israeli architecture between two catalyzing moments in global capitalism, 1973 and 2008. The events of the former, marked by irreparable changes in American relations to the Middle East and the fundamental structures of Israeli society, drastically altered the course of Israeli architecture. Presented through diverse works of photography and video art from international artist Florian Holzherr, Nira Pereg, Jan Tichy, Asaaf Evron, and Fernando Guerra, the exhibition explores this transformative period, the American imprint that endowed it, and the radical changes in Israeli architecture that emerged from it.
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On View> Israeli Pavilion from the 2012 Venice Biennale Headed to New York

The Storefront for Art and Architecture is bringing Aircraft Carrier, the 2012 Israeli pavilion at the Venice Biennale, to New York. The exhibit—one of the most pointedly political statements at the biennale—confronts the influence of the United States and its foreign policy in the Middle East and how it has affected Israeli architecture. The pavilion points to the year 1973 and the OPEC oil crises as a watershed in global capitalism when American strategic interests helped enable a new level of corporate architecture in Israel. The resulting reflected glass skyscrapers set against the optimism of Tel Aviv's White City could not be more a poignant modernist image. The exhibition is accompanied by a catalogue published by German publisher Hatje Cantz and edited by the curators, which contextualizes the phenomena in larger transformative processes. The book include texts by Milton Friedman, Justin Fowler, and Eeva-Liisa Pelkonen and visual works by participating artists Florian Holzherr, Nira Pereg, Jan Tichy, Assaf Evron, and Fernando Guerra. Exhibition Opening: March 7, 2013, 7PM Exhibition: March 7 - April, 29 2013    
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Extended! Past Futures, Present, Futures Lengthens its Stay at Storefront for Art & Architecture

Past Futures, Present Futures Storefront for Art and Architecture 97 Kenmare Street Gallery open Tuesday to Saturday, 11:00pm-6:00pm Through January 12, 2013 Lucky you! The Storefront for Art & Architecture has extended the run of one of their most ambitious exhibitions to date, Past Futures, Present, Futures. Thanks to a spectacular design by LEONG LEONG, the modest proportions of the gallery seem to expand through both space and time. Visitors enter a pleasantly disorienting limbo by stepping from the street through a shimmering wall of silver vertical blinds. The exhibition, which has been extended through January 12, 2013, is divided into several "rooms" where part one of the show—101 unrealized past visions for New York, i.e."past futures"—is broken down and re-presented in a highly experiential way, through collections of images, of sound, and of contextual details (just flip over one of the blinds to reveal a dense info panel). Layered on top of these are past futures are visions for "present futures" by 101 invited architects and designers, including many young New York firms, making it entirely possible to find a Buckminster Fulller scheme next to one by SO-IL. The non-chronological, non-linear show curated by Storefront director Eva Franch with fellows Chialin Chou and Greg Barton is completely open to interpretation. In fact, visitors are even invited to add their own urban visions to the mix (just fill out one of the forms designed by Project Projects and stick it to a swaying blind). The show will continue to evolve as it enters other media, including an interactive website and a publication.
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EVENT> Critical Halloween Party: Saturday, October 27

CRITICAL HALLOWEEN : On Banality, on Metaphor Saturday, October 27 10pm til Late The Autumn Bowl 67 West Street, Greenpoint, Brooklyn The second annual Critical Halloween hosted by the Storefront for Art and Architecture promises to generate a spooky skyline on Saturday. Mixing in a new theme of "Metaphor" with last year's banner of "Banality," guests are invited to critique and comment through costume. Judging by 2011 event (see below), it's the ultimate cathartic carnival for all things architecture and design. Get inspired here. TICKETS $40 Students $100 Everybody Else TICKETS INCLUDE: Admission + Open Bar + Costume Competition Enrollment + Complimentary One-Year Membership to Storefront With: Photography by Naho Kubota Installation curated by NBNY Music by dj N-Ron, Jon Santos and "The Usual Band" Open Bar Costume Competition juried by : Saskia Bos, Alejandro Zaera Polo, Charles Renfro and Eva Franch
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On View> Aesthetics/Anesthetics at the Storefront for Art and Architecture through July 28

Aesthetics/Anesthetics Storefront for Art and Architecture 97 Kenmare Street Through July 28 Storefront for Art and Architecture presents 30 newly commissioned drawings of its gallery space by emerging and established architects, now being auctioned on the Storefront website through Saturday. The gallery is plastered in wallpaper composed of images sourced from architectural drawings produced in the past ten years and describes graphic tools deployed to express properties of drawing that the architectural drawing itself cannot represent, such as birds suggesting movement or green surfaces conveying ecologic awareness. Curator and director of Storefront Eva Franch writes in a statement, “An image (and its after-image) carries within itself a history or performative script of characters, discourses, and conventions. During the last ten years there has been a resurgence of certain representational devices and clichés that operate almost as placeholders or decorative devices to an architecture unable to draw itself.”
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RAD & RED at Storefront for Art & Architecture’s Spring Fundraiser

The Woolworth Building just a few short blocks from Zuccotti Park—the spiritual home of the Ocuppy movement—was itself bathed in radical red last night to celebrate the iconic "red" work of Barbara Krueger and Bernard Tschumi. The two celebrated figures were being honored by the Storefront for Art and Architecture at their annual Spring fundraiser. The yearly event always brings out a fun mix of young and distinguished professionals who come to support the Storefront and drink with friends and collegues. For the event last night everyone was asked to wear something red, and many did including Rick Scofidio who had one long red sock rolled over his pants leg, Archigramer Mike Webb carried around a red tequila laced drink, and Bernard Tschumi wore his iconic red scarf. Storefront board president Charles Renfro (with sorta red glasses) and Beatrice Colomina introduced Tschumi and Kruger at the top of the building's grand marble staircase, but the echo in the room made it impossible to hear a single word of their introductions. Never mind everyone on the staircase looked so fashionable, especially the resplendent Storefront Director Eva Franch. Ms. Franch, who makes all of her own clothes, wore a brilliant red, loopy draped dress that could only come out of the inspired mind of a Catalan like Ms. Franch. View more photos of the event at Storefront's Facebook page.
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New York does a David Double-Take

In the hustle and bustle of city life, sometimes it's hard to find the time to visit a museum. Luckily for time-strapped New Yorkers, a massive copy of Michelangelo's David was trucked around Manhattan on Tuesday, stopping off at the Storefront for Art and Architecture for a manifesto series called "Double" exploring the implications of creating copies, fakes, and replicas before heading to its new home at the 21c Museum Hotel in Louisville, Kentucky. This David, by conceptual artist Serkan Ozkaya is a copy of a copy of the original Florentine model, reimagined twice as tall and painted gold, making it the perfect centerpiece for the evening. Ozkaya's David (inspired by Michelangelo) was originally destined for the 2005 Istanbul Biennial, built of foam from a 3-D digital scan of the original statue by a professor at Stanford. At the time Ozkaya delighted in the notion of copying a work of art without ever having seen the original. After six months of construction, though, the 30-foot-tall David collapsed. Two fiberglass replicas were fashioned from the remains of the original copy, of which Louisville's David is one. Bringing art into the streets has been somewhat of an obsession for 21c founders Steve Wilson and Laura Lee Brown and their chief curator Alice Gray Stites. Outside of their own museum, the three also run Art Without Walls (AWW), bringing art to the streets of Louisville and into the daily lives of its citizens. AWW previously brought Ozkaya to Louisville to hand-render the front page of the city's daily newspaper, the Courier-Journal. At the 21c, Wilson, Brown, and Stites like to push the boundaries of 21st century art, often provoking self-reflection. "Our projects might come up with a better feeling for acceptance and tolerance," Wilson said. "Today we were very successful. I was quoted saying 'penis' in the New York Times." Similarly, Ozkaya is pushing the boundaries of authorship with the double David. Reactions to work selected for the 21c tend to draw strong reactions, and that was the case on Tuesday as the statue made its way through the city. The day got to an eventful start when the driver took the wrong toll lane on the George Washington Bridge from New Jersey, requiring the trailer to back up and causing quite a traffic situation. "A policeman came up—very angry," said Wilson. "I think he was provoked by the nakedness he saw." In front of Storefront, however, crowds gathered in stunned amusement, cellphone cameras in hand. While cameras continued to flash into the night, Ozkaya and a panel of architects and theorists including curator and writer Christopher Eamon, architect Cristina Goberna of Fake Industries, P.S.1 founder and director of the Clocktower Gallery Alanna Heiss, Princeton professor Spyros Papapetros, Hyperallergic editor Hrag Vartanian, and architect and theorist Ines Weizman gathered in front of a packed house to discuss the "Double." The panel gave context to the concept copying, from the endless iterations of Greek temples to Andy Warhol hiring his own double to stand in for him at events. "In 2012, this is one of the most original practices as a methodology of engaging with the history that lies behind us," Storefront director Eva Franch noted. Before any manifesto was delivered, however, an internet clip was shown from Hennesy Youngman where two David statuettes spray-painted black and yellow were transformed into a work of art in a matter of minutes. "The easy part is makin' it," Youngman noted. "The hard part is giving it cultural context." Now, after a brief visit to the Armory Show, David (inspired by Michelangelo) is on its way home to Louisville where it will be displayed atop a 15-foot-tall pedestal in a high-traffic area of downtown near the 21c Museum Hotel. And if you're wondering what Wilson told the Times, there's a souvenir necklace recalling the famous modesty of the replica David at London's Victoria and Albert Museum. "We're producing a necklace" with two pendants, Wilson said. "One is the fig lead and one is the penis. They're on order." A short film by Squaring Off from MyBlockNYC.
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Storefront Gets Real (estate) with NYC

The Storefront for Art and Architecture launched Ingredients of Reality: Dismantling of New York City last Tuesday night.  The show features work by Lan Tuazon, whose bio reads that she was born in the Philippine Islands and "lives and works in New York whether she likes it or not." It would seem from the show, that she likes it--but with reservations.  Through a series of seemingly disparate works, Tuazon calls attention to how real estate decisions have the ability to divide the New Yorkers economically and socially. The piece exemplifying what Storefront's website calls the "repressive logic of property" is "New York City Bar Graph." The installation uses a series of building models, not all necessarily based on the same scale. The models are separated onto different shelves. Sprinkled among some of the more recognizable buildings, like the Chrysler and One World Trade, are several proposed buildings that haven't been built yet. Separated onto its own shelf are the unmistakable forms of public housing complexes. That shelf is dwarfed by the many long shelves devoted to corporate architecture. The artist's commentary is clear: the amount energy the city devotes to corporate square feet far exceeds efforts for public housing. A good chunk of the show addresses the automotive landscape. Two sculptures placed on the floor of the gallery deal with existing parking lots. One wooden sculpture forms an typographical island derived from the city's parking lots, while a similar "landmass" formation made of foam invites visitors to sprawl out on territory that was heretofore verboten for lounging. The most dynamic piece in the show is a wrought iron sculpture called "Architecture of Defense." For the average city dweller the piece looks a tree guard gone awry. Three concentric layers of wrought iron fences culminate with a circular fence at the center whose exclamatory gesture seem more celebratory than threatening. Eva Franch, the gallery's director, compared the piece to the temporary fencing that remained around the circumference of Zuccotti Park several weeks after the Occupy Wall Street demonstrators had been evicted. Likewise, Franch said that the show as whole deals with "different notions of protection, what's public and private--not just for you and me but for us and them." Ingredients of Reality runs through April 12.    
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Critically Costumed For Storefront

"Banality," the theme of Storefront's Critical Halloween costume fundraiser, was manifested in an array of clever--and occasionally perplexing--forms on Saturday evening at the 3-Legged Dog in Manhattan. Blizzard-like conditions did not deter a group of over 250 design-o-philes and at least one (in)famous party crasher from getting decked out in spandex, foam, plush, rubber, tulle, and acres of cardboard. The weather did prevent Liz Diller from arriving to judge the costume contest, but her fearless partner Charles Renfro stepped into the breach, and channeling Damien Hirst in a rhinstone-studded skull mask ("Greed"), took his place alongside judges Wangechi Mutu (embodying Pantone's "Bluebird") and Justin Davidson (dressed as an architecture critic). Each of the three judges picked a winner, and all the winners happened to come in pairs: "Eyes of the Beholder" (Lisa and Ted Landrum); "1:1 Human Scale, male + female" (Kyle May and Julia van den Hout); and the intriguing "Doll Face" (Mark Kroeckel/moustache and Alison Cutlan).  Some architects riffed on their own current work in the costumes (Jing Liu/SO-IL, Meissen exhibition) while others seem to reflect more a state of mind (Bjarke Ingels/BIG, King Kong with colleague Daniel as the Empire State Building; Mitch Joachim/Terreform1 as "Not Bucky"). Now Storefront and Domus are sponsoring an online People's Choice contest. Whose costume gets your vote for most critically banal? See the line-up here.  
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EVENT> 10/29: Storefront’s Critical Halloween

The closest thing we have to Carnival in the US, Halloween offers a chance for type A-types (yeah, we're looking at you, architects) to blow off some steam. Tomorrow night, Storefront for Art and Architecture's hosts its Critical Halloween costume soiree at the 3-Legged Dog at 80 Greenwich St. The theme? Banality! Lest you thought this might be an eggheads-'round-the-punchbowl affair, be aware that this party just made New York Observer's list of New York's 10 Hottest Halloween Events to Die For alongside fetes hosted by the likes of model Miranda Kerr and V Magazine. With a live performance by the Danish band Hess is More, costume prizes bestowed by a jury including architecture critic Justin Davidson of New York Magazine (no banal costume ideas? Go to NY mag's "Approval Matrix" archive and peruse the lower left quadrants), and a stunning array of drink sponsors ponying up not just beer but rum, whiskey, vodka, AND (uh-oh) tequila, we think Storefront's event is going to take banal to new heights (depths?). Tickets are $100 (which includes a year-long membership to Storefront), and students tickets are $40. Because Halloween is all about banality--it just takes architects to make a point of it.