Posts tagged with "Stirling Prize":

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Burntwood School by AHMM wins 2015 RIBA Stirling Prize

Burntwood School, a girls high school in Wandsworth, south London, has won the UK's most coveted architecture award—RIBA's Stirling Prize—with judges describing it as the "clear winner." The project by Allford Hall Monaghan Morris (AHMM) also collected the RIBA London 2015 award in the process. The concrete structure maybe a '50s throwback of sorts, but AHMM's school is by no means a concrete relic of the bygone era. In awarding the project the 2015 Stirling Prize, RIBA, which is seldom accused of playing politics, has also sent a strong message in the importance public education. The building was close to not being built as it was one of the last schools to be constructed under Tony Blair's "Building Schools for the Future scheme"—a policy ditched by current Prime Minister David Cameron in 2010. Education secretary at the time, Michael Gove, granted permission for the proposal even though the scheme had come to an end. RIBA President Jane Duncan spoke to the BBC about the school, noting how it "shows us how superb school design can be at the heart of raising our children's educational enjoyment and achievement." "Delightful, resourceful, and energy efficient buildings that will benefit the whole community in the long term," she continued. "With the UK facing a huge shortage of school places, it is vital we learn lessons from Burntwood." Judges continued that praise, describing AHMM's work as the "most accomplished of the six shortlisted buildings" and showed "the full range of the skills that architects can offer to society."  They went on to add: "Burntwood sets a standard in school design that every child in Britain deserves... It is a culmination of many years of creative toil by Allford Hall Monaghan Morris in designing schools up and down the country. This is their masterpiece." Burntwood fought off competition from five other builds, three of which were also from London. Those included project by Richard Rogers, Niall Mcloughlin Architects, Reiach & Hall Architects, MUMA, and Heneghan Peng Architects. With the price tag just north of $63 million, Wandsworth Borough Council's investment appears to have made architectural dividends as members of the awarding jury showered the building in compliments. AHMM Director Paul Monaghan said schools should be "more than just practical, functional buildings," and good design "makes a difference to the way students value themselves and their education." "Staff and students have said on many occasions that the new buildings have greatly improved the quality of their day-to-day experiences at the school and students comment that their commitment to learning has been enhanced," Burntwood School Principal Helen Dorfman commented. The awarding jury consisted of Peter Clegg, senior partner at Field Clegg Bradley Studios; Rory Olcayto, editor at The Architects' Journal; Dame Theresa Sackler of DBE; Steve Tompkins, director of Haworth Tompkins and 2014 Stirling Prize Winner; and Jane Duncan, director  of Jane Duncan Architects, RIBA president and chair.  
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British architects are now deciding which one of these six finalists is the worst building of the year

Six of the worst buildings in Britain, shortlisted by British magazine Building Design, will battle it out to claim British architecture's least wanted trophy. The projects were chosen by a panel comprising BD editor Thomas Lane; architectural critic Ike Ijeh; writer, broadcaster, and historian Gillian Darley; and architectural designer Eleanor Jolliffe. The list was whittled from ten projects put forward by readers who felt compelled enough to voice their distaste about the structures that rudely entered their view. The Carbuncle Cup is in its ninth successive year and is proving to be a humorous, tongue-in-cheek response to the Stirling Prize awarded by RIBA. Pedigree, it seems, won't save you from being shortlisted for the prize. Foster+Partners and Rogers Stirk Harbour+Partners have previously made the list for their Moor House office development and One Hyde Park projects in London. Past winners include the Strata SE1 building in south London by BFLS and the Cutty Sark renovation in Greenwich by Grimshaw Architects. Last year, Sheppard Robson's Woolwich Central took the prize. The winner of the Carbuncle Cup will be announced next Wednesday, September 9. Take a look at this year's finalists below. 20 Fenchurch Sreet (aka The Walkie-Talkie Tower) London Rafael Viñoly Architects Woodward Hall North Acton, London Careyjones Chapmantolcher Whittle Building Peterhouse, University of Cambridge John Simpson Architects Waltham Forest YMCA London Robert Kilgour Architects City Gateway Swaythling, Southampton Fluid Design Parliament House Lambeth, London Keith Williams Architects
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RIBA awards Liverpool’s Everyman Theatre the prestigious Stirling Prize

The Everyman Theatre in Liverpool, England—a cultural institution with a democratic spirit and a history of producing thespian talent—has topped the competition including Zaha Hadid and won the much sought-after 2014 Stirling Prize from the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA). The new building, designed by Haworth Tompkins, a London-based firm boasting of more than a dozen theater projects, replaces Everyman’s former home in the shell of Hope Hall, a 19th century dissenter’s chapel. Completed in 2013, the new venue now features a 400-seat auditorium, a series of creative workspaces, a sound studio, a “Writer’s Room,” and dedicated spaces for community groups, in addition to a bistro in the basement, a street level café, and several foyers and catering areas. Roughly 25,000 bricks from the original chapel were salvaged and reused for the wrap-around auditorium. This is just one of many sustainable strategies employed, with the goal of achieving a BREEAM Excellent rating, including rooftop rainwater collection, locally-sourced and recycled materials, natural ventilation systems, and a combined heat and power unit to reduce energy consumption. In conceiving the design, the architects sought the feedback of Liverpool locals. The theater’s community-oriented mission is reflected in the “Portrait Wall” mounted on the west-facing facade, which is comprised of 105 aluminum sunshades featuring life-size images of the city's residents. “The new Everyman in Liverpool is truly for every man, woman and child. It cleverly resolves so many of the issues architects face every day. Its context—the handsome street that links the two cathedrals—is brilliantly complemented by the building’s scale, transparency, materials and quirky sense of humour, notably where the solar shading is transformed into a parade of Liverpudlians,” the judges said in a statement. Everyman Theatre beat out high profile projects on the shortlist, such as: Mecanoo’s Library of Birmingham, London Aquatics Centre by Zaha Hadid Architects, London School of Economics by Saw Swee Hock, Student Centre by O’Donnell + Tuomey Architects, Manchester School of Art by Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios, and The Shard by Renzo Piano Building Workshop.
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An Education: Zaha Hadid wins the Stirling Prize

A South London state-funded school is a far cry from an international exhibition center, but in the last two years the annual Stirling Prize, organized by the RIBA, has recognized Zaha Hadid's designs for both as exceptional examples of British architecture. This year's winner, the Evelyn Grace Academy in Brixton was the London-based practice's second consecutive win after last year's prize for the enigmatic Maxxi Museum in Rome. Hadid's design was up against a swathe of accomplished competitors including Hopkins' London Olympics Velodrome, the Royal Shakespeare and Swan Theatres in Stratford by Bennetts Associates and Chipperfield's Folkwang Museum in Essen, Germany. The winning selection signifies an important shift in design for institutional buildings in the UK. The Academy champions a controversial system of non-selective, inner-city schools introduced throughout Britain under the previous government, which aim to bring excellence at every level, including design. Speaking at the event, RIBA President Angela Brady, chair of the judges, said it is “a highly imaginative, exciting Academy that shows the students, staff and local residents that they are valued... what every school should and could be.” For Hadid the challenge was to wrap four schools in one block, maintaining independence for each while expressing an overall unity. On a tightly carved-out urban site, the glass and steel structure slots and snakes around 151,000 square feet and uses Hadid's characteristic structural dynamism to impress upon students a sense of ambition, pride and strength. Taking the Academy's specialist subject, sport, the design makes a theatrical feature out of it, with views on to the grounds and one lasting image of the school has its crisp red running track guiding students to the entrance and sweeping beyond, beneath and around the zig-zag of classrooms, laboratories and offices. The prize also comes at a good time for one of the UK's leading architects who, much to her disgruntlement, has built only three other buildings on home soil, including the Maggie's Center in Scotland and the London Olympics Aquatic Center. The runners-up in the RIBA Stirling Prize 2011: An Gaelaras, Derry by O’Donnell and Tuomey The Angel Building, London by Allford Hall Monaghan Morris (AHMM) Folkwang Museum, Essen, Germany by David Chipperfield Architects Olympic Velodrome London 2012 by Hopkins Architects, supported by the Olympic Delivery Authority Royal Shakespeare and Swan Theatres, Stratford by Bennetts Associates