Posts tagged with "Stadiums":

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Las Vegas Raiders stadium one step closer to reality

Las Vegas is one step closer to getting its own football team and stadium. Yesterday, The Southern Nevada Tourism Infrastructure Committee (SNTIC) unanimously approved a bid for $750 million in public funding for the Manica Architecture-designed project. The decision infuses the itinerant team and it's stadium with a higher potential for realization, but there are still many questions to be answered. SNTIC’s support punts the stadium issue over to Nevada’s Republican Governor Brian Sandoval, who must now convene a special legislative session to approve the funding request. Public financing for the project would be a contingent on the legislature increasing the Clark County hotel tax, perhaps a difficult proposition in a Republican-leaning state where the governor is up for reelection. In a statement released by the governor, Sandoval pledged to hold off deliberating on the matter “until all questions have been resolved,” adding “Nevada has served as the standard bearer for global tourism, gaming, and conventions for decades. In order to remain the top destination, we must explore potential opportunities and push forward to lead this international industry into the next generation of travel and tourism. I am hopeful the work completed by this committee will serve as a roadmap to Southern Nevada’s unrivaled and continued success.” Manica Architecture’s proposal for the stadium, transplanted from an earlier, failed bid the Raiders made for a new home in Los Angeles, is projected to cost nearly $2 billion. Developers for the project consider the $750 million in public funding essential to building the stadium and bringing the team from Oakland to Sin City. The stadium proposal features a massive, retractable roof canopy that would shield the stadium’s 65,000 spectators from the blazing desert heat and aims to connect with the adjacent Mandalay Bay casino and the remainder of the Las Vegas Strip. The final site within the city for the potential stadium to occupy, however, is yet to be finalized. The team is eyeing two adjacent lots hugging Interstate 15: A compact scheme to the west of the Mandalay Bay casino towers, and another, more expansive one to their south. The southern scheme would require partial demolition of the Bali Hai Golf Club but would ultimately consist of a more heavily-landscaped proposal featuring expansive of surface parking.
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Oakland Raiders’ failed L.A. stadium proposal pitched to Las Vegas

Kansas City—based Sports stadium juggernaut Manica Architectures unused 65,000-seat stadium proposal for the Oakland Raiders is on a summer road trip. When the team’s bid to relocate to Southern California fell through earlier this year, plans for the potential Los Angeles Raiders’ Carson, California stadium were thought to have evaporated with it. But the itinerant team and their now-$1.9 billion stadium proposal were spotted in the Nevada desert late last week, as the Southern Nevada Tourism Infrastructure Committee reviewed plans for a potential new addition to the Las Vegas Strip. The design for the new stadium bears much resemblance to the old one, with a regulation-size playing field overlooked by raked seating and leisure areas. According to new renderings included in the proposal, a big difference lies in the stadium roof. While the Los Angeles scenario was presented as an open-air proposal, the Las Vegas version is topped by a massive dome shielding spectators from the blazing Nevada sun. To allow for flexibility, the curving facade elements that support the dome, recycled from the prior scheme, host equally-massive but operable expanses of glass that would open and close as necessary. Unlike Los Angeles, a densely populated and urbanized area (where the now-under-construction Los Angeles Rams stadium will sit on what is widely considered to be the last sizable undeveloped swatch of land in the region), Las Vegas, with its patchwork of casino parking lots, desert scrub, and subdivisions offers many more site opportunities. The two sites being considered: The first is west of Interstate 15 and across from the golden Mandalay Bay casino towers. On this relatively tight lot, the stadium would occupy a compactly-landscaped portion of a site that would otherwise be dedicated to surface parking lots as well as parking structures. The second potential site, located south of the Mandalay Bay casino, would replace a portion of the Bali Hai Golf Club with a more heavily-landscaped arrangement and—according to preliminary site plans—contain surface parking exclusively. The scheme is still subject to approval, leaving team owners to pitch the potential economic benefits of the stadium as justification for their insistence on the city providing $750 million in public funding for the project. Could the team’s owners be pressing their luck? Don’t be surprised if you see this stadium again, somewhere else. UPDATE: Las Vegas has voted to approve the deal.
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Come rain or shine, tennis will be played at this year’s U.S. Open

The Arthur Ashe Stadium at the U.S. Tennis Association (USTA) Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in Queens today unveiled its new retractable roof as well as numerous changes and additions to the tennis complex. Finished in time for this year's US Open on August 29, the roof and masterplanning of the rejuvenated site was served up by Detroit-based firm Rossetti. In 2009, the USTA was pessimistic of constructing a roof over the stadium. They argued it was hard to justify spending such money on a stadium that was used for only a few weeks a year when the organization's primary aim was promoting tennis at the grass-roots level. Now, however, in light of Rossetti's much less costly $100,000 solution the organization has changed its tune.

A photo posted by @usopen on

Spanning 236,600 feet, the Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) weatherproof roof will be primarily used to cover the court during periods of rainfall. USTA Executive Director and Chief Operating Officer Gordon Smith said it "remains to be seen" if the roof will be used as a shading device, though later commented that the USTA's "overriding goal is to be an open court tournament at all times." At the unveiling, Smith and Matt Rossetti of Rossetti boasted of how the roof can open or close in under six minutes. This was put to the test only moments later with the roof being fully closed in five minutes and 22 seconds (under this author's watch). Once complete, there was a marked difference in both light and temperature. No longer necessary to squint, the PTFE significantly reduced sunlight glare while also drastically cooling the arena. The reopening however, wasn't quite as smooth. At the third time of asking after Billie Jeane-King beckoned: "Let there be light, again!" the roof finally opened in swift fashion. Smith later used this as a springboard to inform the audience of how the sensory components of the roof require perfect alignment for the structure to move along the track beds that are in place. Courtesy of the engineers on hand, the delay was only a mere ten minutes and Smith was quick to say that the situation of opening and closing in such a quick manner is unlikely to occur - if at all. It's worth noting that the Arthur Ash Stadium, built in 1997, is the largest tennis arena in the world though it was never designed to have a roof of any kind placed on it. Now though, it is part of an elite group of of a handful of tennis stadia worldwide that can boast a retractable roof, third on the Grand Slam tour to the Rod Laver Arena in Melbourne and Center Court at the Wimbledon Championships in London. Here, the roof takes a minimum of ten minutes to be fully deployed; conditions are ready for play around a further 20 minutes after. This added delay is mostly due to the fact that Wimbledon uses grass tennis courts in which moisture in the soil can lead to an increase in humidity when the roof is closed, making the ball behave differently. Explaining this to AN, Matt Rossetti pointed out how the U.S. Open uses a hard court system which negates this effect. Play would be able to get underway much more quickly with players barely noticing a difference. Rossetti also responded to questions from AN regarding the new problems a roof would create such as water run-off and climate control. In response to this, Rossetti identified the large metal guttering that traces the perimeter of the roofscape. 15 feet wide and four foot deep, Rossetti recalled how he reacted with shock to the design requirement. "We said no way, something's got to be wrong!" Rossetti exclaimed regarding the results of the calculations that stipulated such monumental guttering. In terms of maintaining a constant climate, Rossetti also noted the large power unit nearby which will power the the roof system as well as act as a chiller for the space. The roof isn't the only change going on at Flushing Meadows either. Part of a masterplan from Rossetti, a new Grandstand stadium has been built, replacing the old venue which was famed for its intimate environment. Rossetti iterated how this intimacy has been maintained as a key component of the new stadium's design. Sunk into the ground, the new 8,000-seat venue uses a PTFE skin to form partial bowl around the arena. Set against the edge of the nearby Flushing Meadows park, the bowl, which is perforated and broken down into segments, aims to imitate "the view through the foliage" in a similar fashion to the adjacent trees. The tectonic structure secures the 486 panels through a "cable structure with parametric geometry" while also mimicking the "branches" of the surrounding greenery. In addition to this, all the courts have seen an increase in capacity while the smaller courts have been pushed slightly south to free up circulation and facilitate the increase in visitors. Though the proposed landscaping isn't quite yet all in place, Rossetti said the esplanade to the north of the grand stand is a "phenomenal place to be."
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NY Islanders may build new arena on Willets Point

The New York Islanders may have a new home at Willets Point, right next to the Mets' Citi Field in Queens. The hockey team now plays at the SHoP-designed Barclays Center, but the 15,700-capacity space is reviled by fans and players alike. Fans have complained of seats with obstructed views (there are 1,500), while players bemoan the low quality of the ice. Home games averaged 13,626 fans, the third lowest turnout in the league. Frank Gehry's proposal had a greater capacity and better sightlines for hockey games, but the scheme was scrapped amid cost-cutting. The team moved to the Barclay's Center after its former owner wasn't able to secure public funding to build a new arena on the site of the Nassau Coliseum, the Islanders' home. The team has been discussing a move for months; it would put them closer to their Long Island fan base, Bloomberg reports. The northern Queens neighborhood the Islanders could call home is a potholed warren of chopshops wedged between Flushing Meadows Corona Park and Flushing Creek. The shops that flourish there provide skilled jobs, and its unpaved streets lined with cars in various states of assembly offer an intriguing detour (and great auto parts discounts) for intrepid visitors. But, like all New York spaces that could be developed to produce a higher return on capital, Willets Point will soon be transformed, one way or another. In 2012, Sterling and Related, Hudson Yards' developer, struck an agreement with the city to convert the neighborhood into a giant soulless shopping mall (uh, retail and entertainment district) to which the Islanders may say YES! YES! YES!
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L.A.’s new soccer stadium is one step closer to being shovel-ready

Gensler’s proposal the Los Angeles Football Club’s (LAFC) $250 million stadium complex in South L.A. moved one step closer to becoming a reality this week when the L.A. City Council “unanimously approved” the final Environmental Impact Report for the 22,000 seat stadium project. The sports arena is expected to be the most expensive privately-financed soccer stadium in the country. Like many new urban stadium proposals, LAFC’s stadium is also set to feature sidewalk-adjacent restaurants, office space, a conference area, as well as a soccer museum alongside its more traditional sports programming. The new stadium for the as-yet-unnamed franchise will replace the outmoded and unloved L.A. Sports Arena, a 1959 Welton Becket-designed, elliptical transverse steel truss roof-clad spaceship of a building. That structure has been the home for the Los Angeles Lakers and Los Angeles Clippers professional basketball teams as well as University of Southern California’s and University of California, Los Angeles’s college basketball teams in the past. It has also hosted concerts by Pink Floyd, Madonna, Michael Jackson, and the Grateful Dead. The L.A. Sports Arena held its final event in March when Bruce Springsteen performed there to a sold-out concert. Demolition of the L.A. Sports Arena is set to begin in June of this year. The new stadium is expected to open in 2018.
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FC Barcelona unveil images for new expanded Camp Nou stadium

Despite being arguably one of the biggest, if not the biggest names in club soccer, FC Barcelona occupies an aging stadium. The Camp Nou, as it is known today, was originally built in 1957 with the iconic Francesc Mitjans-designed open bowl. Today, the all-seater stadium can hold 99,354 fans, and while the arena had upgrades 1982, 1995, and 2008, the need for radical modernization has been in the pipeline for quite sometime. Behind the $651.9 million project is the Japanese firm Nikken Sekkei, who will be delivering their first project in Europe, collaborating with Catalan architects Joan Pascual and Ramon Ausió. Paying respect to Mitjans' original concept, whose design allowed the arena to essentially become a modern day colosseum with no roof and roaring crowd, the team have "inverted" the bowl. A roof is now set to encapsulate every spectator—an upgrade on the meagre canopy that before only sheltered the monarchy and high-rollers. The ETFE-clad translucent roof will visually maintain the sense of openness and also boost the atmosphere: it will amplify the stadium's acoustic qualities by keeping sound in and allowing it to reverberate around. https://youtu.be/-i6gsb_bRW8 “Our design is derived from the essence of the original stadium,” said Takeyuki Katsuya of Nikken Sekkei. “The great open space around the stadium is like a large piece of origami, carefully arranged not to disturb the flow of people into the stadium. People can be outside, enjoying the Mediterranean climate." “It is a perfect match,” added Pascual. “We’re speaking as architects to architects. This has allowed us to get to know each other well. We understand what Barca is, what it represents and we know what it means for the city. The project is very respectful of the work of Mitjans and the solution was to continue his path." “The whole project needed to simultaneously capture the two settings, the stadium and the city. It will feel timeless. The members will continue to feel at home; they will not see the difference. They will only notice the improvements.” In terms of capacity, allocation will be expanded to an estimated 105,000 spectators. While only averaging an attendance of just over 70,000 in recent years, some 98,760 piled in to watch el classico (vs. Real Madrid) in March last year. While needs must, the refurbishment of the stadium's often unseen underbelly will be a loss to some. The rugged concrete aesthetic of the stadia's inner workings had an honest appeal. The stadium bore the scars of disgruntled fans through visible etchings and crater marks. As a result, the stadium had developed a character. The concrete infrastructure was also partially open to the elements. This was unusual compared to the arena's contemporary counterparts but, given the structure's size, it allowed the coastal breeze to supply natural ventilation (a must on a balmy evening in the mediterranean) and also offered views across the vicinity. Nikken Sekkei have dutifully maintained this aspect and have in fact taken it further. The upper concourses will be much more open, facilitating panoramic views, with only pitched eaves as barriers to the outside. Subsequently, this continues the theme of openness and sense of honesty, perhaps restoring what will be lost through materiality.   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hfsxpnLXSxg At ground level, the stadium's perimeter will be bound by a glass facade, meanwhile escalators and elevators will be added to improve accessibility to all tiers, replacing the stairways that exist today. Current Barcelona player Andrés Iniesta commented that “for me and everyone at the club this is an important step forward in our history. Having a stadium like this means we’ll continue to set new standards as the best team in the world.” Work on the new stadium will continue through to the 2021/22 season, by which time Iniesta will be 37. "Everyone will be able to enjoy the New Camp Nou in their own different way," he said, with a hint that he may not be in the team at that point. The stadium is part of a wider scheme to develop the immediate area which will see American firm HOK design a new Palau Blaugrana multisports arena. An hour-long video of the full stadium presentation, which has been open to public can be view below. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e94wrr02120
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Populous unveils design for Minnesota United FC’s stadium

Major League Soccer’s newest expansion team, the Minnesota United FC, unveiled the first renderings of its planned 20,000-seat stadium. Designed by Kansas City–based stadium experts Populous, the field is expected to be complete by the start of the 2018 season in the Snelling-Midway neighborhood of St. Paul. The outdoor stadium will be enveloped in an LED-illuminated translucent PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) facade, which will act as a shade for the spectators.

Currently the proposed site, a parking lot for city buses, is not so fondly referred to as the “bus barn.” But the team believes the location, outside of downtown, can grow with the team and that the stadium can help give the area an identity all its own. Much to the praise of the public, the team plans to privately finance the entire $150 million budget, a departure from the economic model of most stadiums. Once completed the stadium will become publicly owned. Plans for the surrounding area have also been unveiled, including mixed-use retail, office, and residential developments. Completion is scheduled for 2018.

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Populous unveils plans for Jacksonville Jaguars’ amphitheater and flex field

After having already unveiled plans to develop Jacksonville's Shipyard district, the Kansas-based firm Populous has released plans for their Jacksonville Jaguars' Amphitheater and Flex Field project.  With steel bridges that stretch over the St. John’s River, Populous, as they say on their website, are intent on delivering "an icon to the City of Jacksonville." Populous specializes in stadia, sports facilities and event architecture. https://player.vimeo.com/video/153512721 The firm has already released their plans to transform the Shipyard district into a space for recreation and entertainment, a scheme also backed by the Jaguars' owner Shahid Khan. There, the plan is to rejuvenate the area and kick-start a fruitful period of economic activity. Now Khan has his eyes set on developing his teams stadium vicinity. The area appears to be a happy hunting ground for the firm. In 1995, they designed what the New York Times called the "nation’s most luxurious locker room." An undulating prefabricated canvas spans the "flex field" whose roofscape is supported by a series of long-span steel trusses, sloped columns, and an array of cables. Multipurpose arenas are almost an economic necessity for the contemporary stadium typology and Populous' scheme is no exception. The canvas roof system also allows the space to be brought to life with "dramatic" LED lighting when used for entertainment purposes, while also doubling up as a football training facility. Jags Amp Renderings4
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Bjarke Ingels’s design concept for moat-lined Redskins Stadium unveiled on 60 Minutes

In a segment on 60 Minutes this weekend, architect Bjarke Ingels provided a glimpse of the football stadium he is designing for the Washington Redskins. A scale model displayed on the CBS news program showed a curvaceous, open-air seating bowl enveloped in some sort of fabric or mesh—and surrounded by a moat. The model depicts the stadium as a semi-transparent, wave-like structure. The moat is depicted as a space for kayakers, with parks and pedestrian bridges for tailgaters and fans. “The one thing that everybody is…excited about is that the stadium is designed as much for the tailgating, like the pre-game, as for the game itself,” Ingels told 60 Minutes interviewer Morley Safer in a statement released by CBS News and partially aired during the program. “Tailgating literally becomes a picnic in a park. It can actually make the stadium a more lively destination throughout the year without ruining the turf for the football game." On Friday, the NFL team confirmed that it had hired Ingels’ firm, BIG, of Copenhagen and New York, to design its new stadium. The team has not disclosed a location for the project. It is reportedly considering sites in Prince George’s County, Maryland; Loudoun County, Virginia; and the District of Columbia. The team currently plays at FedEx Field in Landover, Maryland, but has its headquarters in Ashburn, Virginia. The stadium is one of many BIG projects featured in the 60 Minutes profile of Ingels, who was described as “the architect of the moment.” Safer referred to him as a starchitect, putting a heavy emphasis on the c-h in starch. Other BIG projects shown on the program included the Google headquarters in California, the LEGO headquarters in Denmark, Two World Trade Center in New York, and Via 57 West,  the “courtscraper” project in Manhattan that is a combination of a skyscraper and a courtyard building. Safer, 84, expressed admiration that Ingels, 41, is getting such large commissions even though he is relatively young. “A lot of people are willing to lay down millions of dollars for this kid,” he said. Ingels told Safer he originally wanted to be a cartoonist but ended up studying architecture and became “smitten.” He said he is aware of the irony of his firm’s name, which stands for Bjarke Ingels Group. “Denmark,” where he was born and started his firm, “is one of the smallest countries on the planet,” Ingels said. “There was something funny about calling a company BIG. If I started in America, I don’t think I would ever have named it BIG.” Ingels said he was touched when he learned that a firefighter in New York thought of his stepped-tower design for Two World Trade Center as a “stairway to heaven,” evoking the staircases where first responders lost their lives in the 9/11 terror attacks. “It’s probably the most watched skyline in the world,” he said of Manhattan. “So it’s a place where you better get it right.”
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Two groups renew the effort to save the all-concrete Miami Marine Stadium

Can decay on the Bay be forestalled? In 2014, a local group floated the idea of murals, and now, two nonprofits, the National Trust for Historic Preservation and Dade Heritage Trust, are renewing efforts to restore the Miami Marine Stadium on Biscayne Bay. Shuttered since 1992, both organizations have had their eyes on saving the seaside stadium for years. The National Trust listed the structure, built in 1963, on its annual 11 Most Endangered Historic Places in 2009, and declared it a National Treasure three years later. In a bid to cement its preservation in perpetuity, the stadium has been nominated for inclusion on the National Register of Historic Places. If approved, the cost of the restoration would be reduced by $6 million, as the project would qualify for federal historic tax credits. To introduce attendees to the preservation cause, the Dade Trust and the National Trust will run an information kiosk at the Miami International Boat Show, in Virginia Key, from February 11 to 15. A petition that circulating there and online asks City of Miami commissioners to prioritize the stadium's restoration this year. Already, the city has created an advisory committee to decide on future directions for Virginia Key, which includes the restoration and reopening of the stadium. An RFQ for engineering and architectural services for the stadium is out, and so far Miami has spent more than $20 million on restoring land around the stadium. Designed by Hilario Candela, a 27 year old Cuban architect, the all-concrete, 6,566 seat stadium was built to watch speedboat races. The roof, as long as a football field, was the longest span of cantilevered concrete in the world when it was built. The folded plate roof is anchored by eight concrete columns set back as far as physics would allow to afford almost unimpeded views of the bay. To draw attention to their cause and highlight the stadium's design, the National Trust will project vintage stadium footage in the evenings onto the structure this Friday through Sunday.
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With the Rams leaving town, SPACE Architecture speculates on a St. Louis pro soccer stadium

St. Louis–based SPACE Architecture + Design has release a series of renderings for a speculative Major League Soccer (MLS) stadium for downtown St. Louis. This proposal comes in the wake of news that the NFL’s St. Louis Rams football team would be leaving St. Louis for Los Angeles, and subsequently not building a new stadium along the Mississippi River. Sports buzz has picked up again about a possible MLS team making its home in the city. Since the news that the city would be losing the professional football team, MLS Commissioner Don Garber and State Governor Jay Nixon  have continued to discuss the possibility of an expansion team in St. Louis. SPACE initiated the discussion of what a major league stadium would look like within their office two years ago when rumors of MLS’s interest in the city started to spread and fans began grassroots efforts to attract a team. In a discussion with AN, Alex Ihnen of SPACE explained the office’s motivations behind preemptively presenting the city with a stadium plan. “We think too often politicians and people who are excited think about money, they think about how we are going to pay for this, where do the taxes come from," he said. "That is their domain, but our domain as architects is to figure out how can this add to the city, which is bigger. It is important to get out ahead of this” The offices proposal involves a sunken field directly south of the historic Union Station. Union Station itself is under redevelopment. Located along Clark Street, SPACE envisions its proposal as a part possible downtown sports corridor, which would include the Major League Baseball Busch Stadium, home of the St. Louis Cardinals and the Scottrade Center, home of the National Hockey League’s St. Louis Blues. And though the proposal is an unsolicited speculation, the discussion of funding a stadium is already being taken seriously by state legislators. A ballot initiative has been presented by State Rep. Keith English to incur a one tenth of one percent sales tax in St. Louis and St. Louis County. The bill is written as to try and avoid a similar fiasco as the current Rams stadium, Edward Jones Dome, which has not been fully paid for despite the team leaving the city.
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With Rams move to Inglewood comes a new HKS stadium

On Tuesday, L.A. football fans had their dreams answered. NFL owners voted to approve the St. Louis Rams’ move to Los Angeles for the 2016 season, with an option for the San Diego Chargers (and perhaps the iconic Raiders) to also come to their new stadium in Inglewood designed by HKS. The proposed stadium is just one of a slew of stadium schemes that have been bandied about over the last few years, such as MANICA’s Charger’s 72,000-seat stadium on a 168-acre site in Carson, Gensler’s Farmer Field in Downtown Los Angeles, and other plans for the City of Industry, Elysian Park, the Rose Bowl, and the Los Angeles Coliseum. Located on the site of the former Hollywood Park racetrack, the HKS design promises a shell-like transparent roof over a 70,240-seat stadium with and extra 30,000-person capacity for standing-room-only events. Slated for opening in 2019, the approximately $3 billion plan includes a large landscaped area and mixed-use development on the city-owned land. “It's going to be so much more than going to a football game,” HKS’s Mark Williams told the LA Times. “You're going to be absorbed into the site, absorbed into the stadium and get a very wide bandwidth of experience. It's the kind of memory people are going to cherish for a lifetime.” See the gallery below for more images of the project.