Posts tagged with "stadia":

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Rafael Viñoly Architects may bring New York City’s first soccer stadium to the Bronx

Rafael Viñoly Architects is set to design New York City's first soccer stadium. Related is spearheading the 26,000-seat Bronx project, which will be the future home of the New York City Football Club. Similar to Hudson Yards, Related's mega-development on Manhattan's Far West Side, the stadium will be constructed over rail yards by the Harlem River in the South Bronx. While a deal for the site hasn't been finalized, YIMBY got its hands on the preliminary renderings for the RFP, which Related submitted with Somerset Partners. Somerset Partners is working on a major project on an adjacent lot, a development with nearly 1,300 units of market-rate housing along 1,200 feet of the river. Given soccer's popularity in the five boroughs, it's surprising that the Bronx stadium will be the city's first. The renderings right now make the toilet seat–shaped arena look more like a massing diagram than anything, but the design is sure to evolve if the city accepts the developers' proposal. The Architect's Newspaper (AN) reached out to Viñoly's firm and Related for comment, and both declined to share any more details on the project. The stadium will be joined by affordable housing in a project the developers are calling Harlem River Yards.  The New York City Football Club's new home and the 550 units of housing will be joined by a medical facility, retail, and an 85,000-square-foot park. Related and Somerset would lease the 12.8 acre property for $500,000 annually for 99 years, and invest $125 million total in sitework and a planned waterfront park. Harlem River Yards is expected to cost $700 million in total, and it's slated for completion by 2022.
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Texas Rangers unveil new stadium by HKS

Go Rangers, go! HKS has released renderings for its new Texas Rangers stadium as well as a design update for the new complex, dubbed the Globe Life Field. The seats at the 1.7-million-square-foot baseball stadium are closer to the field and lower than traditional stadium seating to bring a capacity crowd of 41,000 fans as close as possible to the action. A retractable, transparent roof can flood the field with sunlight or close up for inclement weather, but even when open, the roof's baffles and shields block players from direct sunlight. Arches along the upper concourse are turned 90 degrees to increase transparency along the thoroughfare, while the stadium entry is set off with an overhang – a nod to the traditional Texas front porch. Total cost? A cool $1.1 billion. Dallas-based HKS also designed the L.A. Rams stadium, which at $2.66 billion has the somewhat dubious distinction of being the world's most expensive stadium to date. Technicians punched 20 million holes in the facade's 36,000 perforated aluminum panels, eliminating the need for an HVAC system (and driving project costs sky-high). The complex is expected to be finished by 2019. Back in Texas, the groundbreaking for the 13-acre Rangers site is scheduled for this Thursday, September 28. Games at the Dallas–Fort Worth-area Globe Life Field will begin in the 2020 baseball season.
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Populous unveils plans for Jacksonville Jaguars’ amphitheater and flex field

After having already unveiled plans to develop Jacksonville's Shipyard district, the Kansas-based firm Populous has released plans for their Jacksonville Jaguars' Amphitheater and Flex Field project.  With steel bridges that stretch over the St. John’s River, Populous, as they say on their website, are intent on delivering "an icon to the City of Jacksonville." Populous specializes in stadia, sports facilities and event architecture. https://player.vimeo.com/video/153512721 The firm has already released their plans to transform the Shipyard district into a space for recreation and entertainment, a scheme also backed by the Jaguars' owner Shahid Khan. There, the plan is to rejuvenate the area and kick-start a fruitful period of economic activity. Now Khan has his eyes set on developing his teams stadium vicinity. The area appears to be a happy hunting ground for the firm. In 1995, they designed what the New York Times called the "nation’s most luxurious locker room." An undulating prefabricated canvas spans the "flex field" whose roofscape is supported by a series of long-span steel trusses, sloped columns, and an array of cables. Multipurpose arenas are almost an economic necessity for the contemporary stadium typology and Populous' scheme is no exception. The canvas roof system also allows the space to be brought to life with "dramatic" LED lighting when used for entertainment purposes, while also doubling up as a football training facility. Jags Amp Renderings4
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Kengo Kuma claims commission for Tokyo Olympic Stadium as Hadid fumes

At last, design for the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Stadium has finally been decided with Kengo Kuma's winning commission. The Japanese firm fought off a plan by Toyo Ito to claim the prize. Zaha Hadid, however, was less than complimentary of the decision. The 80,000 capacity stadium will cost $1.2 billion, almost half the cost of Hadid's proposal and will crucially be constructed by Taisei Corp, a major firm in Japan. That's not to say that decision isn't still mired in controversy. Nicknamed the "hamburger," several architects, according to the Financial Times, claim it bears “remarkable similarities” to a an earlier design that was scrapped in July. Utilizing a wood and steel roof, Kuma's design creates a green space within the city of Tokyo with the facade’s horizontal lines seemingly referencing the 1,300-year-old Gojunoto wooden pagoda at Horyuji Temple. Meanwhile the environment is completed via the implementation of Jingu Shrine trees and other foliage found within the vicinity of the stadium. Prime Minister Shinzo Abe spoke of the design, saying "I think this is a wonderful plan that meets criteria such as basic principles, construction period and cost," when he announced the winning practice. Hadid, though, has other ideas. “Sadly the Japanese authorities, with the support of some of those from our own profession in Japan, have colluded to close the doors on the project to the world,” Zaha Hadid Architect's said in statement. "This shocking treatment of an international design and engineering team ... was not about design or budget." "In fact much of our two years of detailed design work and the cost savings we recommended have been validated by the remarkable similarities of our original detailed stadium layout and our seating bowl configuration with those of the design announced today," she continued. Completion is set to be around November 2019, though there are doubts that it will be ready in time for the Rugby World Cup that Japan is hosting that year. This was initially a requirement that was demanded by the Japan Sports Council and one that Hadid says her firm would have been able to meet. “Work would already be under way building the stadium if the original design team had simply been able to develop this original design, avoiding the increased costs of an 18-month delay and risk that it may not be ready in time for the 2020 Games.” Meanwhile, president of Tokyo 2020, Yoshiro Mori, has said, “The stadium incorporates the views of experts in the construction field and we are looking forward very much to using the new stadium as the centrepiece of the Tokyo 2020 Games.”
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Pittsburgh Penguins hire Bjarke Ingels for new residential housing development

The Pittsburgh Penguins, via their residential developer are set for, in the words of Bjarke Ingels, a "promiscuous hybrid" form of residential housing aimed at bridging the Uptown and Downtown areas of Hill District. The development will occupy a 28-acre plot of land around the former home of the Penguins the Civic Arena. Pittsburgh and the residents of Hill District must be ready for an iconic and maybe even bizarre piece of development, as the Danish firm specializes in the outlandish and obscure. Copenhagen, where the firm started, has become accustomed to Ingels' eccentric works, with some 26 projects having been built there already, but this is Ingels' first foray into a mid-size American city. BIG's Pittsburgh reception remains to be seen as no renderings have yet been released, though it's hard to see it not having a positive impact in the vicinity. The area to be developed, called the Hill District, is in need of rejuvenation and has been for sometime. According to the Post-Gazette, in 2010, over 40 percent of the local population was living below the poverty line but there is positive news as well, development projects in the area are on the rise—a supermarket opened in 2013, ending a more-than-30-year food desert. Quite what BIG will dream up, no one knows. Travis Williams, COO of the Penguins, claims hiring Mr. Ingels is a coup. "It will be something new and unique for Pittsburgh and I think the results are going to be phenomenal," he told the Post-Gazette. Quite what Hill District will make of it however, remains to be seen.
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Woods Bagot Sets Lofty Heights for ‘Modern Colosseum’ in Rome

Rome is home to what is likely the most iconic example of sport architecture on the planet. The Colosseum is a distant precedent for the design of most stadiums, but Woods Bagot has chosen to make the connection explicit in their new project for local soccer club AS Roma. The international firm has unveiled their vision for a new, more centrally located venue set to open at the start of the 2016–2017 season. Stadio Della Roma is a 52,500 seat stadium designed explicitly with the concept of home-field (pitch if you're in Europe) advantage in mind. The building features a tightly wrapped seating bowl and a steeply-pitched, explicitly-delineated Curva Sud section for the club's "ultras" or most ravenous supporters. Ancestral inspirations manifest themselves in the form of a circular opening and a floating stone screen that envelops the structure and rewrites the curves of the arches of the Colosseum in a sharper, more angular vocabulary. The scheme also calls for a large hydraulic elevator system that consciously or unconsciously nods to another Ancient Roman contribution to sporting venues. The new stadium's lift will be used for bringing players to the surface rather than ferocious exotic animals. High-tech training facilities, a Nikestore and a Roma Hall of Fame will be other new amenities housed on the grounds. Dan Meis, a familiar figure in American arena architecture, will be leading the undertaking.
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London’s Weston Williamson Take Flight with Bird-Inspired Brasilia Stadium

London-based Weston Williamson won first prize in an international competition to design the Brasilia Athletics Stadium, an innovative skeletal structure inspired by the wings of a bird in flight. The huge, feather-like formations that create the structure's undulating roof canopy will be constructed from lightweight concrete and steel connections. This feather-like roof will be in a constant state of flux, as the individual sections respond to environmental fluctuations, such as wind and sunlight. "The exterior form of the new athletics stadium reflects the utopian spirit of the Brasilia plan by incorporating a geometry that is ever-changing," the studio said in a statement. "The stadium, therefore, has no fixed identity, but alters in relation to the condition of its surroundings." The circular stadium sits on a wood-clad plinth surrounded by pools of water and dense vegetation which allows for cooling and ventilation of the structure. Should Weston Williamson’s 70,000-seat design vision be realized, the Brasilia Stadium would be home to the Rio 2016 Olympic Games. The architects at Weston Williamson will be awarded a $12,000 prize for conceiving the winning entry.
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Out-of-This-World Cup Stadia in South Africa

Americans do like soccer, contrary to what many around the world believe. American architects, though? Hard to say.. But even for the most soccer-agnostic architects, there are four good reasons to watch -- or at least glancingly pay attention to -- this year's World Cup in South Africa. Four of the 10 stadia designed or renovated for this year's quadrennial World Cup really are worth checking out beyond the context of international soccer matches. These stadia will be long-lasting legacies of the World Cup; that's good news for people who want to check these structures out, but potentially bad news for the cities that have invested hundreds of millions of dollars in what may become massive white elephants. And here they are, AN's favorite four!! Soccer City Stadium, Johannesburg The showpiece of the World Cup, this striking earth-toned stadium will play host to eight of the tournament's 64 matches, including the opener and the final. Designed by  South Africa-based Boogertman + Partners in conjunction with U.S.-based Populous (formerly HOK Sport) the stadium is actually a renovation of the original Soccer City, built in 1987, the structural profile of which remains at the core of this updated version. The new design gives the stadium a three-tiered structure with room for about 94,700 people -- the biggest in Africa. It was modeled after the calabash, a traditional African gourd pot, and its bowl-like appearance makes it one of the most interesting World Cup sights to see. Driving down the Soweto Highway at night, it can almost be mistaken for a far-off twinkling city skyline. Now accessible by the Johannesburg's World Cup-instigated Rea Vaya bus rapid transit system, the stadium will see some continued use in the future as home to the South African National team, as well as various cultural and sporting events. And additional commercial and residential developments are also expected to rise up around the stadium, so locals are hoping the $440 million the city invested will pay off in the long-run. Moses Mabhida Stadium, Durban This brand new stadium in Durban has maybe the most unexpected design of all the World Cup Stadia. Modeled after the South African National Flag, the stadium has a 105-meter-high arch that runs the length of the oval-shaped structure. At one end, that arch splits as it heads towards the ground, creating a gap that provides a view of nearby downtown Durban to people in the stands during its seven World Cup matches. The stadium as a whole has a very ship-like feel to it, which is appropriate in Durban, South Africa's famous beachside city. And, as an added novelty, the arch boasts a funicular "skycar" that transports tourists up to its apex for what are probably some very sweet views of the city. The bold can even bungee jump from the top, though a series of malfunctions with the skycar left a number of tourists stranded at the top of the arch on multiple occasions leading up to the Cup. This stadium was designed by GMP Architekten, a German firm, and the designer of two other notable stadia on this list. At a cost of 4.8 billion Rand (roughly $640 million), Moses Mabhida Stadium is the second most expensive stadium built for the World Cup. There will be seating for 70,000 for the World Cup, but the amount of seating can be reduced to 54,000 or increased to 80,000 depending on the need. Need, however, is a concern in Durban, as no professional team (soccer nor rugby) has yet decided to use it as their home base. Nelson Mandela Bay Stadium, Port Elizabeth GMP Architekten's design for this brand new stadium in the relatively small but growing oceanside city of Port Elizabeth has an appropriately nautical feel. Overlooking the city's North End Lake, the stadium exterior emulates the sails of an early trading ship, and its pointed bulges are like the ridges on a bottle cap. Host to just five World Cup matches, the stadium's impressive features are likely to push it across TV screens far more than its game count would otherwise merit. After the Cup, the city is hoping that two local teams -- one rugby, one soccer -- will take it on as their home field. But both of those teams have not succeeded in climbing into their sports' respective top leagues, which makes the prospect of regularly filling a 48,000-seater for minor league sports unlikely. This unfortunate reality has left the city questioning the wisdom of its $270 million investment -- and worried about the stadium's future. Cape Town Stadium, Cape Town This subtle but attractive stadium is less a statement of its own than an exclamation point for a city with more than its share of iconic scenery. Positioned near the tip of Africa, Cape Town boasts an incredibly scenic oceanfront. And with Table Mountain and Signal Hill behind it, the addition of this brand new stadium to the city's beach side Green Point Common is just icing. Its strong vertical walls and gently dipped roof line accentuate the flatness of the city's famous mountains, and also provide a classy look to what is already a posh and cosmopolitan city. Though there has been some controversy about the selection of Green Point as the site of a brand new stadium when existing stadia in the city could have been World Cup-ready with little investment, the stadium is already considered a postcard asset. GMP Architekten's design includes a translucent skin, which turns the stadium into a bright glowing light during evening events. And an innovative roof design contains much of the sound generated at the stadium within its walls, a boon to nearby residents who would otherwise be subjected to the impressively loud sound of up to 68,000 vuvuzelas. Seating will be reduced to 55,000 after Cape Town's eight World Cup matches are over. At a total cost of roughly $773 million, this is the most expensive stadium of the World Cup. City officials have contracted with a management company to book events in the stadium to help pay off what has been a major investment for the city.
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Change At Wimbledon

There's a feeling of drastic change this year at the All England Lawn Tennis Club, home to the Wimbledon tennis tournament. Don't worry, the players are still wearing all white and bowing and curtsying to the Queen. But when one looks upward from Centre Court they'll see a new translucent, retractable roof, meant to keep away the rain that inevitably delays the matches every year. Designed to close in about ten minutes, the new roof , designed by Populous (formerly HOK Sport; they switched names a few months ago) is constructed of tensile Tenara fabric, which unfolds, accordion-style, across the ceiling. Held up by roof trusses,  the fabric has a 40% translucency that lets light penetrate and—vitally— reach the grass below. Working with a system that immediately removes humidity when the roof closes, it seems to be working well. But some wonder if it's really the same tournament without all the sogginess and with all the high-tech gimmickry. Especially at a place best known for its resistance to change. We don't know, but we'll be happy to check it out! Anyone? Anyone?