Posts tagged with "st. louis rams":

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With the Rams leaving town, SPACE Architecture speculates on a St. Louis pro soccer stadium

St. Louis–based SPACE Architecture + Design has release a series of renderings for a speculative Major League Soccer (MLS) stadium for downtown St. Louis. This proposal comes in the wake of news that the NFL’s St. Louis Rams football team would be leaving St. Louis for Los Angeles, and subsequently not building a new stadium along the Mississippi River. Sports buzz has picked up again about a possible MLS team making its home in the city. Since the news that the city would be losing the professional football team, MLS Commissioner Don Garber and State Governor Jay Nixon  have continued to discuss the possibility of an expansion team in St. Louis. SPACE initiated the discussion of what a major league stadium would look like within their office two years ago when rumors of MLS’s interest in the city started to spread and fans began grassroots efforts to attract a team. In a discussion with AN, Alex Ihnen of SPACE explained the office’s motivations behind preemptively presenting the city with a stadium plan. “We think too often politicians and people who are excited think about money, they think about how we are going to pay for this, where do the taxes come from," he said. "That is their domain, but our domain as architects is to figure out how can this add to the city, which is bigger. It is important to get out ahead of this” The offices proposal involves a sunken field directly south of the historic Union Station. Union Station itself is under redevelopment. Located along Clark Street, SPACE envisions its proposal as a part possible downtown sports corridor, which would include the Major League Baseball Busch Stadium, home of the St. Louis Cardinals and the Scottrade Center, home of the National Hockey League’s St. Louis Blues. And though the proposal is an unsolicited speculation, the discussion of funding a stadium is already being taken seriously by state legislators. A ballot initiative has been presented by State Rep. Keith English to incur a one tenth of one percent sales tax in St. Louis and St. Louis County. The bill is written as to try and avoid a similar fiasco as the current Rams stadium, Edward Jones Dome, which has not been fully paid for despite the team leaving the city.
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With Rams move to Inglewood comes a new HKS stadium

On Tuesday, L.A. football fans had their dreams answered. NFL owners voted to approve the St. Louis Rams’ move to Los Angeles for the 2016 season, with an option for the San Diego Chargers (and perhaps the iconic Raiders) to also come to their new stadium in Inglewood designed by HKS. The proposed stadium is just one of a slew of stadium schemes that have been bandied about over the last few years, such as MANICA’s Charger’s 72,000-seat stadium on a 168-acre site in Carson, Gensler’s Farmer Field in Downtown Los Angeles, and other plans for the City of Industry, Elysian Park, the Rose Bowl, and the Los Angeles Coliseum. Located on the site of the former Hollywood Park racetrack, the HKS design promises a shell-like transparent roof over a 70,240-seat stadium with and extra 30,000-person capacity for standing-room-only events. Slated for opening in 2019, the approximately $3 billion plan includes a large landscaped area and mixed-use development on the city-owned land. “It's going to be so much more than going to a football game,” HKS’s Mark Williams told the LA Times. “You're going to be absorbed into the site, absorbed into the stadium and get a very wide bandwidth of experience. It's the kind of memory people are going to cherish for a lifetime.” See the gallery below for more images of the project.
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HOK and 360 Architecture unveil new renderings of a revamped stadium for the St. Louis Rams

HOK last week released new renderings of a speculative stadium on the banks of the Mississippi River—the latest in the saga of the NFL's Rams franchise as it mulls leaving St. Louis for its original home, Los Angeles. St. Louis Rams owner Stan Kroenke last year bought 60 acres next to the Forum in Inglewood and has announced plans to build an HKS-designed, 80,000-seat stadium there. In St. Louis, a city-appointed task force replied with a 64,000-seat, open-air stadium designed by HOK and 360 Architecture on which they have staked “the reinvention of St. Louis’ city center.” The latest renderings don't show many changes, but do offer a bit more detail on how the Rams' St. Louis home would look, should they choose to stay. Earlier this month a judge approved the use of public money for the project, although many have criticized such pursuits, noting thin evidence that subsidies for sports franchises have any positive impact on municipal economies.   NOTE: (HOK completed the acquisition of 360 Architecture in early 2015 and they are now one firm. HOK recently launched a new Sports + Recreation + Entertainment practice.)
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New HOK stadium renderings show off St. Louis for restless Rams football franchise

Missouri's football fans are savoring plans for a new NFL stadium in downtown St. Louis, but it remains unclear if the HOK-led designs will be enough to keep the Rams from leaving. In January fans of the St. Louis Rams got new reason to fear their football team might depart when owner Stan Kroenke announced plans to build an HKS-designed 80,000-seat stadium in the Los Angeles suburb of Inglewood. Twenty years after the NFL team left L.A. in the first place, they may well move back—but not if St. Louis officials and fans have their way. New renderings released in March give more substance to plans that could woo the Rams into staying: a football and soccer stadium on the banks of the Mississippi River designed by St. Louis–based HOK. The National Football League has said no team relocations will happen this year, but either stadium plan could be ready for construction in 2016. A proposal for a new NFL stadium in downtown St. Louis. (HOK) A proposal for a new NFL stadium in downtown St. Louis. (HOK) A proposal for a new NFL stadium in downtown St. Louis. (HOK) A proposal for a new NFL stadium in downtown St. Louis. (HOK)
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St. Louis offers the Rams a new stadium on the Mississippi—if they stay

St. Louis' NFL franchise, the Rams, left Los Angeles in 1994. Twenty years later they're mulling a move back, but not without a fight from the residents of their new Midwestern home. Last week plans for a new arena on the banks of the Mississippi River upped the ante, promising Rams fans 64,000 seats and an open-air stadium designed by HOK and 360 Architecture that a city-appointed task force called “the crown jewel of the reinvention of St. Louis’ city center”. L.A., where the Rams were founded and played for nearly 50 years, offers an 80,000-seat stadium designed by HKS. The Associated Press said last week that billionaire Rams owner Stan Kroenke wasn't returning calls from St. Louis city officials. In November Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon appointed Former Anheuser-Busch President Dave Peacock and Attorney Bob Blitz to lead a task force on the new stadium proposed for the North Riverfront area of downtown. Their plan, released Friday, said “the new stadium will impose no new tax burden on taxpayers in the local region or the State of Missouri”. It proposes bridging I-44 to link the Edward Jones Dome with St. Louis' Great Rivers Greenway network and the CityArchRiver grounds, where the city's iconic Gateway Arch and Museum of Western Expansion are undergoing a massive renovation and expansion. If approved, the stadium, which would also play host to Major League Soccer games, would start construction in 2016 and be ready for games in 2020. That is, if St. Louis still has a team; The National Football League has said no team relocations will happen this year. st louis arena (courtesy HOK, 360 Architecture) aerial st louis arena (courtesy HOK, 360 Architecture) 3 st louis arena (courtesy HOK, 360 Architecture) elevation st louis arena (courtesy HOK, 360 Architecture) field st louis arena (courtesy HOK, 360 Architecture) soccer