Posts tagged with "Spiral Jetty":

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On View> "Tacita Dean: JG" at the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles

Tacita Dean: JG Hammer Museum 10899 Wilshire Boulevard Los Angeles Through January 26, 2014 JG, the latest work in film from British-born, Berlin-based artist Tacita Dean, is inspired by her correspondence with British author J.G. Ballard and the connections between his short story, “The Voice of Time,” and Robert Smithson’s landmark earthwork, Spiral Jetty. Shot entirely on 35mm anamorphic film, JG utilizes Dean’s patented system for aperture gate masking. The labor intensive, decidedly analogue process allows the artist to expose and re-expose negatives, live on location, for a meditative, collage-like effect that melds images of the barren Utah and Central California landscapes with forms of mountains, planets, pools and Smithson’s Spiral Jetty. Spoken text, drawn from Ballard’s written work and correspondence between Dean and the author, accompanies the film. Dean’s films have been exhibited since the mid 1990s. They focus on subjects such as artists, architecture, and landscape, and are characterized by long, static shots, stillness, and a contemplative evocation of place. JG is being shown at the Hammer Museum’s video gallery in Los Angeles through January 26.
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Quick Clicks>Spirals, Alchemy Tower, Sidewalk Cocktails, & Chemicals

Spiraling Out of Control. Salt Lake Tribune reported that the New York-based Dia Foundation's failure to pay the annual land fees for Robert Smithson's Spiral Jetty has resulted in the state of Utah's appropriation of the artist's famous "earthwork masterpiece." Dia subsequently released a statement explaining that they were not aware of the pressing payment and are in negotiations with the state to ensure the water sculpture's preservation. Artinfo digs deeper to find that the problem could have been caused by a computer or clerical error and says the Dia Foundation hopes to have the matter resolved by the end of the week. Bad Chemistry. According to DNA, Lower Chelsea residents are fighting to stop Alchemy Construction's development of a 30-story tower at 31 W. 15th Street.  The development firm bypassed standard zoning regulations after securing air rights from the Xavier High School, which will utilize the lower floors as new classrooms and event space.  The Lower Chelsea Alliance maintains that construction of the 300-foot tall building is already causing noise and odor pollution and insist the tower will ruin the neighborhood's aesthetic character. Good Mixing. Further uptown, the Wall Street Journal exposes the first gourmet food truck with a one-year liquor license.  The city has permitted the Turkish Taco Truck in Central Park to serve beer, wine, and cocktails as long as it provides seating and remains parked.  Now introducing: better lunch breaks. Toxicology. The New York Times reveals the National Toxicology Program's recent report identifying formaldehyde and styrene as carcinogens. While consumers are at minimal risk due to the low quantities in wood construction materials and plastics, respectively, the chemicals pose a serious threat to factory workers.  The industry is attempting to dispute these results, but some manufacturers have already sought alternative production.