Posts tagged with "Soho":

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Design worth its salt: Dattner and WXY team up for municipal infrastructure on Manhattan’s West Side

The New York City Department of Sanitation's (DSNY) Soho facilities prove that design for trash need not be rubbish. On a grey December day, five architects gave a tour of two buildings—the Spring Street Salt Shed and Manhattan Districts 1/2/5 Garage—that comprise DSNY's new facilities on Spring Street at the West Side Highway. The five architects leading the tour included WXY principal Claire Weisz, Dattner Architects principals Kirsten A. Sibilia and Paul Bauer, Dattner associate Gia Mainiero and Rick Bell, executive director of the Office of the Chief Architect at the NYC Department of Design and Construction (DDC). The first stop on the tour was the Spring Street Salt Shed. The structure is a textbook take on "form follows function." Designed to resemble a salt crystal, the cast-in-place concrete shed can hold up to 5,000 tons of road salt. When salt is piled up, Mainiero explained, it assumes an "angle of repose." The roof is slanted to match that angle, with walls ranging from two to six feet thick. While the structure's form embraces salt, the materials were chosen to prevent its corrosive effects: the concrete admixture is self waterproofing and architects applied a hardener to the concrete floor. Trucks drive into the salt shed to pick up their loads, so the lower portion of the walls are plated with steel to prevent errant shovel dings. In New York City, each Community Board (the neighborhood-level governing body) is responsible for its own sanitation. The Spring Street facilities are shared by Community Board 1, 2, and 5, as well as UPS, and a Con Ed substation. The garage can hold 150 sanitation trucks, and contains fueling, washing, and repair stations for vehicles, as well as administrative offices. Though the building is four stories, it feels more like eight, with interior ceilings up to 30 feet high. Citing community concerns about a potentially loud, unsightly sanitation facility in the neighborhood, the DDC and the design team worked closely with area stakeholders to create a facility with curb appeal. Walking from the salt shed to the garage, the architects pointed out the double-skin facade that wraps the 425,000 square foot building. Each floor has a different, but equally cheery, color-code. 2,600, 30 inch wide fins made of perforated, coated aluminum line the exterior. The panels are timed to move with changing position of the sun, though workers can manually override the settings to control light flow. "The color is interesting and subtle from the outside," explains Weisz. "The louvers create a composition and a scrim, yet the facade is very calm." In a nod to surrounding tall luxury developments, the design team treated the roofs of both buildings as facades. A 1.5-acre green roof, planted with 25 different species of succulents and perennials, helps control runoff, cool the building, counts towards the building's (eventual) LEED Gold certification, and could be used as an events space. Party planners take note: there are sweeping views of the Hudson on three sides. Design decisions were made to reduce the overall mass of the garage. At the rear of the building, the roof slants, mirroring the angle of the three lane driveway, one story below.
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Archtober Building of the Day 29> The Musket Room by Shadow Architects

The Musket Room 265 Elizabeth Street, Manhattan Shadow Architects If we visit Michelin star restaurants next Archtober, we’ve got to make a deal for the meal. The meal’s the thing here. The Musket Room moved into Manhattan's old Rialto space, a long-gone hangout for architects working in the nearby Puck Building. It's got a gun over the bar. Larry Cohn of architect-of-record Shadow Architects, prepared the filing documents that wended their way through the post-Sandy building department. The warm woods and teal leather banquettes specified by London-based Alexander Waterworth Interiors, have replaced the bright red plastic ones that lined the brick side walls of the not-forgotten Rialto. A nice chap, Larry, took us through the restaurant, and showed us the spanking clean basement kitchen with its array of chemical lab experiments called food. Frank Hanes, the sous chef, explained the polyethylene-encased meats that were being cooked sous-vide: venison leg fillets, a specialty of the house on the menu as “New Zealand red deer/flavors of gin,” which includes licorice and fennel – and maybe a juniper berry or two. You can tell I’m not a foodie. It was nice to see nasturtiums growing in the raised beds in the back that serve as an herb garden for the chef, New Zealander Mack Lambert, who conjures a nasturtium vinaigrette that might appear somewhere in the early courses of our future meal. We could top it off with Pig’s blood/berries/rhubarb/herbs for dessert. Cynthia Phifer Kracauer is the Managing Director of the Center for Architecture and the festival director for Archtober: Architecture and Design Month NYC. She was previously a partner at Butler Rogers Baskett, and from 1989-2005 at Swanke Hayden Connell. After graduating from Princeton (AB 1975, M.Arch 1979) she worked for Philip Johnson, held faculty appointments at the University of Virginia, NJIT, and her alma mater.
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Gaetano Pesce walks the line between art and architecture with new exhibit in Soho

  Gaetano Pesce is a designer who works between art and architecture and wants his designs to attack or argue against the results of standardized commercial design. He uses poetry, sometimes humor, color, and texture (in foam, resin, and urethane ) to create whimsical chairs, couches, and domestic art for gallery spaces. Last summer his designs filled the ground floor of Rome’s MAXXI museum in a provocative but fun filled array of his designs. Now you can see a small collection of his objects in a design show at the Allouche Gallery on Spring Street in Soho. This includes a wooden version of his anthropomorphic UP 5&6 chair and ottoman, depicting a female body chained to a ball. First created in 1969, the work is meant to denounce sexism and women’s enslavement to male prejudice. In the front of the gallery there is a fluffy (if Epoxy Resin, Dacron, and Metal can be described in this way) white cloud lamp (top) that looks a bit like a double atomic bomb blast to this reviewer. But then it also looks as if it is about to walk off! Go have a look at the gallery at 115 Spring Street.
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Eavesdrop> Breakfast in Peril: This enormous mirror comes crashing down on the Soho brunch set

  One doesn’t expect to be in danger when noshing on a croissant and sipping some coffee at a swanky Soho Brasserie—maybe a spilt Bloody Mary at worst. But, one morning in February, at Keith McNally’s Balthazar, the preeminent power breakfast spot in Soho, customers got quite the fright when an enormous mirror, mounted to a wall, came crashing down on them. https://twitter.com/beabea_cakes/status/568799802315575297 The incident elicited cries to call 911, according to the Daily News. Arnaud Montebourg, a French Politician and rumored presidential candidate, saved the day by catching the frame. The New York Times also reported that several employees and diners fortunately saw the mirror slowly sliding off the wall, giving everyone enough time to retreat from harm’s way. If a lesson is to be learned, French-inspired brasseries should always have a Frenchman present in case of a crisis. https://twitter.com/lizeswein/status/568791913450446850 https://twitter.com/brentkawahara/status/568799747663724545
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Imma let you finish, but Kanye West had the best minimalist Manhattan bachelor pad of all time

The utilitarian Manhattan loft formerly owned by rap mogul Kanye West bespeaks deep pockets and a distaste for cluttering decor. The 1,585 square foot bachelor pad, which West sold in 2013 for $4.5 million, is an ultra-minimalist expanse of French limestone and pear wood—and not much else. Completed in 2007 by illustrious Italian designer Claudio Silvestrin, the one-bedroom loft boasts 12-foot-high ceilings and an open floor plan for “continuous flow of space” with no partitions separating the living area, kitchen, and master suite. Right angles and straight lines reign in the unflinchingly geometric design, the freestanding stone kitchen island aligning perfectly with the refectory-style dining table. The only other monolith of stone to break the monotony is the sculptural bathtub adjoining the master bedroom, which has its own walk-in dressing area. Keeping the stripped-down look from veering into hospital corridor-like severity are hidden light sources at the base of the walls and near the ceiling, while the soft white walls, textured flooring and large windows along two sides of the square loft provide almost-homey touches. As the architect couches it, the spartan design "conveys a feeling of solemnity that is elegant rather than intimidating." West moved into the space in 2008, while it was still under construction, selling the fourth-floor unit on West Houston Street for $4.5 million in 2013. These views of West’s loft include renderings of the celebrity abode along with photos taken by brokers after he had moved out.
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Archtober Building of the Day #20B> Donald Judd Home and Studio

Archtober Building of the Day #20 Donald Judd Home and Studio 101 Spring Street Architecture Research Office; Walter B. Melvin Architects The Soho of the 1970s has come and gone, grungy artists’ studios replaced by glitzy storefronts and luxury condos. However, two decades after artist Donald Judd passed away in 1994, his presence still permeates 101 Spring Street. It’s in the nooks he carved out for his children and his books, his kitchenware and furniture, and, most of all, his art. To Judd, 101 Spring Street was love at first sight. He purchased the cast-iron corner building in 1968 and was careful to respect the integrity of the space when setting up his life and his work. Dividing walls are kept at a minimum, and everything is arranged to leave the right angles of the windows uninterrupted. Light generously floods the interiors. Though not an architect, the godfather of Minimalism knew a thing or two about arranging spaces. Somehow, in the master bedroom, a site-specific Dan Flavin light installation coexists in harmony with works by Claes Oldenburg and John Chamberlain. Despite the sleek metal surfaces of his work, the range of surfaces and textures in his home reveals the breadth of his taste. The restoration, led by Architecture Research Office (ARO), was guided by Judd’s last will and testament: make necessary repairs, but leave the rest unchanged. Restorers looked through old photographs and arranged walk-throughs with Judd’s friends and visitors to determine the precise location of artworks and furniture, and everything in between. There was probably more clutter when Judd was around, but, according to our Judd Foundation guide, the artist had his own organizational systems in place. A custom-made cabinet with a very low shelf was specifically designed to store cutlery side-by-side in a single row. According to ARO Principal Adam Yarinsky, the restoration’s main challenge was how to introduce the modern infrastructure of museums without impacting the character of the building and its art installations. In the 1960s, Judd removed all sprinklers from the third and fourth floors, claiming that they interrupted the building’s sightlines. ARO consulted with Arup to devise a fire-proofing system that would not detract from the space’s qualities. Walter B. Melvin Architects, which led the facade renovation, installed new but old-timey double-paned glass to protect the art from harmful UV rays. Judd is gone, but his art and his legacy live on. The artist’s careful considerations, along with ARO’s precise renovation, allow the spaces to showcase the art and vice versa.
Camila Schaulsohn is Communications Director and Editor-in-Chief of e-Oculus. She was born and raised in Santiago, Chile.
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Cadillac to leave Detroit for New York City

While its product development teams and manufacturing facilities will remain in Michigan, Cadillac will move its headquarters to downtown New York City from Detroit, parent company General Motors announced Tuesday. A new office in Soho will house the “majority of functions with oversight and responsibility for both global and U.S.” starting next year, GM said in a statement. The iconic car brand is currently based in the Renaissance Center, whose towers define the skyline of Detroit. As such, the move is likely to rankle some who have seen the real estate rebound in downtown Detroit as a cause for celebration amid increasingly dire prospects for the Motor City, which last year became the largest U.S. municipality to file for bankruptcy in the nation's history. Cadillac's decreasing sales and struggle to stand out among GM's brands are key challenges for the company's new president, Johan de Nysschen, who joined the company last month from the Infiniti division of Nissan.
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SOFTlab creates a flowery vortex for a New York City couture shoe shop

Forget about the Sharknado, New York–based designers at SOFTlab have created a vortex of flowers that has taken over one Manhattan shoe store, bringing SOFTlab's signature parametric forms to the modern shoe brand, Melissa. The Soho store already grabbed design headlines when it opened its flagship location decked out in a custom-fabricated Corian interior by architecture firm Eight and Associated Fabrication. This latest design intervention is part of Melissa's "We Are Flowers" campaign that used organic shapes and colors to inform its shoe line. SOFTlab was the chief designer behind “We Are Flowers” and, as the title suggests, created a looming art installation of synthetic flowers right inside the Melissa flagship. Using bright colors and familiar natural forms, the installation creates an aesthetic meant to appeal to both shoppers and pedestrians just passing by. And with 20,000 distinct flowers, it's difficult to miss. The installation, as it happens, is an encompassing, immersive one that hangs over the top of the store in its entirety. This is achieved by suspending the flowery panel from a hand-bent metal frame. The underlying digitally-designed mylar structure that supports the flowers is comprised of fastened, laser-cut pieces that give the final product its curving shape. The flowers are also laser cut and individually hand-fastened to the delicate netting. The process is detailed in the installation video above. The final product is a gleaming interior garden at Melissa that winds its way through the entire store. The We Are Flowers installation is currently on view at Melissa's Manhattan flagship at 102 Greene Street.
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Rem Again: OMA Designs a Third Gallery for Lehmann Maupin

Rem Koolhaas and OMA may have grander commissions and more famous clients (Miuccia Prada?), but probably not a more devoted and long lasting partnership than with David Maupin of the Lehmann Maupin Gallery. The gallerist first commissioned Koolhaas to design a new exhibition space on Manhattan's Greene Street in 1995 and again when they moved to 26th Street in Chelsea ten years later (there is non-OMA-designed Lehmann Maupin on the Lower East Side). Now the Lehmann Maupin Gallery has asked OMA to design a third gallery, this time in Hong Kong. On Greene Street Koolhaas gave Lehmann Maupin a simple but stunning design that featured an enormous moving plywood wall that was at once not precious (like Soho at the time) and a classic white box gallery. The Dutch architect carried this same theme over to Lehmann Maupin's Chelsea gallery but with the addition of travertine floors. Now for Lehmann Maupin's latest gallery, in the central, pre-war Pedder Building in Hong Kong, Koolhaas has brought a bit of old Soho "loft" style to Hong Kong. The new gallery space features marine plywood, modern fixtures and minimalist lighting set against the rough existing walls of the Pedder building. The new design features a corner entrance "that obscures the boundary between the interior and exterior" while leaving the two gallery rooms divided by a large sliding plywood wall/partition as in Soho. It's a honest, straight-forward design that "reveals, rather than conceals, the patina that distinguishes the historic building from its more glossy neighbors." The art work in this Hong Kong Image is from the gallery's first show of the Korean artist Lee Bul.
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A Corian Carnival in SoHo

Fabrikator

Brooklyn-based Associated Fabrication realized all the merchandise displays, benching, shelving, and cash wraps for Melissa Shoes in Pearl Gray Corian.

Before Kinky Boots came to Broadway, Melissa Shoes opened shop in SoHo. The Brazilian shoe brand, known for its use of brightly colored, recycled PVC material and collaborations with designers like Jason Wu, Vivienne Westwood, and Gareth Pugh, opened its first U.S. boutique in the states last year. With the help of local architecture firm Eight Inc. and Brooklyn-based Associated Fabrication, a distinguished aesthetic was achieved that supports the original Sao Paulo shop's rotating art theme, but with a much cleaner slate of epoxy floors and Pearl Gray Corian bollard-like merchandise displays. Working from two-dimensional drawings provided by the architects, Jeffrey Taras of Associated Fabrication used Rhino to model the 34 display platforms. Taras grouped the displays, which resemble blunted stalagmites, into categories of varying heights and configurations—single columns in four different heights, double columns in two groupings, and one cluster of three columns.
  • Fabricators Associated Fabrication
  • Architects Eight Inc.
  • Location New York
  • Date of Completion 2012
  • Material Corian, plywood, MDF
  • Process Rhino, CNC mill
"A lot of this [project] was production engineering and breaking down the pieces into as few parts as possible to ease assembly," explained Taras. "We also had to figure out how to break the pieces down to form the Corian the way it had to be done." Each stand is hollow and constructed from five different parts of thermal-formed Corian. The base radius is made from two pieces, the shell extrusion is also two pieces, and a single portion at the top completes the unit. Since a seamless connection between the pieces was necessary to achieve the aesthetic, there was almost not tolerance for error in the fabrication process. After each stand was modeled in Rhino, the fabricators used a CNC milling machine to cut molds from plywood and medium density fiberboard. Taras created a single mold for the base ring components of all 34 stands and another uniform mold was created for the shell extrusions. Varying heights were achieved by trimming the extrusions. The caps, vary by diameter; the taller ones are smaller because of a more tapered extrusion, and the shorter ones are wider. Thus Taras created different molds for the top pieces of the varying heights. As each of the components was assembled, it was run through a trim jig to exactly meet the other seams. "The most challenging units were the double units, and the combination of three stands spliced together," Taras said. "We created a full piece assembly, created a custom jig for the CNC mill, and then cut out matching surfaces for each of the pieces that formed the units." The jig was also designed in Rhino, and cut on the CNC mill. The completed units were finely sanded and were placed as freestanding displays in the boutique. Associated Fabrication was also responsible for 18 small and six large shelves—affixed to the walls with a stainless steel pin and silicone—six mirror bases, 11 benches, and two cash wraps, all made from Corian. A new table is also currently being made for the space.
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Quick Clicks> Cooper, Dharavi, Evolution, Charts

Keeping Cooper. There's a fight brewing over the demolition of the 186-year-old 35 Cooper Square. A demolition permit had been issued and subsequent stop work orders and candlelight vigils. The small federal style structure was once home to descendants of Peter Stuyvesant and beatnik Diane DiPrima. Keep tabs on the little building at EV Grieve and the Bowery Alliance (And in other Cooper Square preservation news, what's going to happen to the Astor Place mosaics under the planned pedestrian plaza upgrades?) Slum for Sale. In the heart of Mumbai, India, the Dharavi settlement is under pressure to redevlop. Polis has a review of a new documentary on the struggles of a "city tearing at the seams" trying to balance capital growth and the needs of its inhabitants. Urban Evolution. Cities are constantly changing, but we rarely take the big step back and look at how an area has evolved over, say, the past 500 years. Aid Watch put together a visual history of one block in New York's Soho neighborhood, from wilderness, to brothel central, to home of high-end retail. (Via Economix.) Infographic. Gothamist uncovers an interesting chart comparing Chicago and New York by the statistics. Categories include miles of transit track, cost of living, and even who has better pizza.
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Marino-designed Soho Store Inspires Chanel Makeup

The fabulous Peter Marino has designed a fabulous new store for Chanel in Soho, which opened Friday for Fashion Night Out. It’s so fabulous that Chanel Global Creative Director Peter Phillips created a new makeup line paying homage to Marino’s sleek lines and the sleeker girls who hobble about the cobblestone streets surrounding the store. As for the renovation itself, it was inspired by the artsy spirit of the neighborhood and features an acrylic Chanel No. 5 bottle that stands over 10 feet high and will display video art as well as video of runway shows from Paris. The newly outfitted boutique has a gallery feel to it, complete with commissioned artworks by Peter Belyi, Alan Rath, and Robert Greene. More makeup and makeover after the jump.