Posts tagged with "Society of Architectural Historians":

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Society of Architectural Historians announces Awards of Architectural Excellence

The Society of Architectural Historians (SAH) has announced the winners of its 2016 Awards for Architectural Excellence. The award for Architectural Stewardship is going to philanthropist Richard H. Driehaus. Sarah Herda, director of the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts, will receive the award for Public Engagement with the Built Environment. Architect Peter Landon, FAIA, founder and principal of Landon Bone Baker Architects, has won the Design, Planning and Sustainability award. Founded in 2010, the SAH Awards for Architectural Excellence were begun to honor individuals in architectural practice and academic study. This year’s awards will be presented at a benefit gala at the Racquet Club of Chicago on November 4th. Proceeds from the gala will go towards the restoration of the SAH headquarters in the 125-year-old Charnley-Persky House, one of the few residences designed by Louis Sullivan and Frank Lloyd Wright. Richard H. Driehaus is the founder of Driehaus Capital Management LLC, the Richard H. Driehaus Foundation, and Richard H. Driehaus Charitable Lead Trust. Over the last 30 years, through philanthropic gifts, Driehaus has contributed the historic preservation of multiple buildings and landscapes from the Ransom Cable House to the restoration of Old St. Patrick’s Church, to name just a few. Sarah Herda is the director of the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts. The Graham Foundation is the largest institution in the United States dedicated to awarding project-based grants to individuals and institutions working on architectural projects and research. Since becoming it director, Herda has transformed the foundation's headquarters into a world renowned venue for the exhibition of art and architecture. In 2015 Herda, along with Joseph Grima, was the co-artistic director of the inaugural Chicago Architecture Biennial. Peter Landon is the founder and principal of Landon Bone Baker Architects (LBBA). In the past several years LBBA has been recognized for its socially-conscious design, city planning, development, and architecture. Landon’s work ranges from the adaptive reuse of the Dorchester Art + Housing Collaborative to the Parkside mixed-income high-rise development on Chicago’s Near North Side. The Society of Architectural Historians is an internationally recognized organization which promotes the study of architecture, design, landscapes, and landscape urbanism. The SAH uses print and online publications, as well as local, national, and international programs to advocate for the engagement with the history of the built environment.
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Society of Architectural Historians announces 2016 SAH Awards

The Society of Architectural Historians (SAH) has named its 2016 SAH/Mellon Awards Recipients. This year’s winners are Peter Christensen, Itohan I. Osayimese, and Robin Schuldenfrei. The award is specifically designed to provide financial support for scholars in the process of publishing their first monographs related to the history of the built environment. Often scholars are responsible for paying for the rights and permissions for images, as well as commissioning new maps, charts, and line drawings. Peter Christensen’s forthcoming book, Germany and the Ottoman Railways: Art, Empire, and Infrastructure (Yale University Press) covers his research on the politics surrounding the construction of train stations, settlements, and other infrastructure in the context of the Ottoman railway network. Christensen is assistant professor of art history at the University of Rochester Itohan I. Osayimese’s Colonialism and the Archive of Modern Architecture in Germany (University of Pittsburgh Press) explores the relationship between colonialism and German modernist architecture from the 1850s to the 1930s. Osayimese’s ties the forms of German modernism to the country’s colonial endeavors in Africa, Asia, and the Pacific. Osayimese is an assistant professor of the history of art and architecture at Brown University. Luxury and Modernism: Architecture and the Object in Germany 1900–1933 (Princeton University Press) by Robin Schuldenfrei examines the divide between modernism’s democratic and utopian ideals and existing design and production structures. Schuldenfrei is the Katja and Nicolai Tangen Lecturer in 20th-century Modernism at The Courtauld Institute of Art. Founded in 1940 at Harvard University, the Society of Architectural Historians works with scholars and professionals. The SAH provides historical services and guidance to its 3,000 members and 800 institutional members in 56 countries. Architecture, urbanism, and landscape history are all covered by the SAH. The SAH also maintains the Archipedia online encyclopedia of American architecture.
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SOCIETY OF ARCHITECTURAL HISTORIANS STRIVES FOR COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT AT INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE IN CHICAGO

  This April, the Society of Architectural Historians will hold its 68th Annual International Conference in Chicago. Leading scholars from around the world will convene to present new research on the history of the built environment. But the conference goes beyond an examination of the past by providing a forum for present-day discussions and firsthand experiences of the built environment. SAH aims to engage two important audiences—conference attendees and the local community—with public programs that include the SAH Chicago Seminar and guided architectural tours. The SAH Chicago Seminar, “Magnitudes of Change: Local Sites and Global Concerns in Chicago’s Built Environment,” features local architects, architectural historians, and policy makers addressing issues surrounding the transformations of Chicago’s waterways and its neighborhoods. The half-day program is anchored by a keynote address by Harvard University landscape architecture professor Charles Waldheim. More than 30 tours of the region’s architecture and landscapes will be led by an impressive group of Chicago-based architects, architectural historians, preservationists and nonprofit leaders. Chicago’s Pilsen, Uptown, Pullman and Chinatown neighborhoods will be featured, along with structures designed by Louis Sullivan, Frank Lloyd Wright, Walter Netsch, Studio Gang and JGMA, among others. Tickets are on sale now at sah.org/2015.
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New PBS Series To Showcase Ten Buildings That Changed America

These days it seems increasingly rare that we take a moment out of our busy schedules to pause and appreciate our surroundings: downtown skyscrapers, grand civic buildings, or the mundane background buildings along our streets. To many, those soaring steel towers are old news, but have you ever stopped to picture a Manhattan without skyscrapers, or a courthouse in Washington, DC that didn’t resemble a Greek or Roman temple, or how about an America without shopping malls? (Unimaginable. Right?) Dan Protress, writer and producer of the new PBS television series 10 Buildings that Changed America, certainly has. The series, hosted by Emmy-award winning producer Geoffrey Baer, proves that architecture is the cultural back-bone of any society.  The show was created to celebrate and explore ten of the most influential American buildings—and the architect’s that designed them—that dramatically altered the architectural landscape of this country. Featuring buildings like Frank Lloyd Wright’s Robie House in Chicago, which transformed the idea of the American home, the Southdale Center in Edina, MN, the nation's first enclosed shopping-center, and the Wainright Building in St. Louis, which, according to historian Tim Samuelson, “taught the skyscraper to soar,” the series delves into the history of these once radically perceived buildings and highlights the roles they have played in molding present-day American society. The Society of Architectural Historians, along with a group of architectural experts, has compiled a list of the ten most iconic and influential structures built by different architects ranging from various eras in American history: 1. Virginia State Capitol, Richmond, CA (1788) 2. Trinity Church, Boston, MA (1877) 3. Wainwright Building, St. Louis, MO (1891) 4. Robie House, Chicago, IL (1910) 5. Highland Park Ford Plant, Highland Park, MI (1910) 6. Southdale Center, Edina, MN (1956) 7. Seagram Building, New York, NY (1958) 8. Dulles International Airport, Chantilly, VA (1962) 9. Vanna Venturi House, Philadelphia, PA (1964) 10. Walt Disney Concert Hall, Los Angeles, CA (2003) The show is scheduled to air on Sunday, May 12, 2013 at 10:00 p.m. EST. Tune in and discover the pioneering architectural leaders, breakthrough concepts, groundbreaking buildings, and touching stories that make up the architectural history of the United States. Who knows, you might just be tempted to take a moment out of that busy schedule to admire your surroundings. All images courtesy Wikimedia Commons.
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Exploring Kappe in the Valley

The Southern California chapter of the Society of Architectural Historians (SAH) recently capped off a Ray Kappe-focused weekend with a home tour around Kappe’s many Sherman Oaks homes. As part of the series, The Architect's Newspaper got a chance to peek inside one of Kappe’s earliest works, the Dr. and Mrs. Robert Hayes House. Stepped far back from the street, the home is accessed only through a small path that one could easily miss among the rows of residential homes. The house was atypical of Kappe’s work, said historian Dana Hutt, but one can still see the beginnings of Kappe’s many architectural themes, including the aggressive opening of space, the blurring of inside and outside by continued elements and the complex layering of space. The four-bedroom, two-bath house has a simple triangular silhouette. Glass sliding doors and clerestory windows surround the house allowing ample light in. Wood beams from inside the home continue outdoors forming large eaves, through which filtered light easily cast over the outdoor patio. In its heyday of entertaining, the Hayes house would welcome up to forty guests, the owners adding space  by opening up one of the sliding partitions that flows right into a patio. “That patio was part of the house, not outside of it,” insisted Dr. Hayes, now retired from his work at UCLA. Inside, the space becomes more complex. A high ceiling over the living area is made more intimate with a lower frame over the kitchen and dining areas. Every part of the late 1950s home is used and very much lived in. Bookshelves are full of thick textbooks. Framed posters and paintings line the walls. On the living room mantle, a quaint box of handwritten recipes is still neatly filed, ready to be used at a moment’s notice. “As much as this house is Ray’s, this was also Alice’s,” said Dr. Hayes, referring to his deceased wife, who had closely collaborated with Kappe during the home’s construction in the late 50s. While driving along a stretch of West Los Angeles, it was Alice who spotted Kappe’s National Boulevard apartments. The design captured her imagination and when she arrived home, she told her husband, “Bob, I found him.” Him, being the architect of their new home. When asked how he felt about returning to the home after so many decades, Kappe in typical deadpan fashion replied, “It’s never good to revisit.” A grin lingered on his face, suggesting quite the opposite. While the row of trees fronting Sepulveda Boulevard has thinned—“This used to have better shading,” said the architect—the home has held up remarkably well through the years, even weathering the great Northridge earthquake.